The Impromptu Romance [1830]


Introduction

This is a translation of "Le Roman impromptu," found in the second edition of Manuel complet des jeux de société by Élisabeth Celnart, published in 1830. The game also appeared in the third edition in 1836, the new edition in 1846, and the revised edition in 1867. Whether the game appeared in the first edition in 1827 remains unknown.

The fact that Celnart draws a comparison between this game and "The Butterfly" raises the question of whether she intends to highlight how control is passed from one player to another or whether she is observing a similarity between a storytelling game and an extremely basic role-playing game or both. "The Butterfly" is a "let's pretend" game in which each player is designated to be a kind of flower or a kind of insect, and when their species is named, the designated player begins describing their perspective on life in the same flowerbed where the other players' personnages ("characters") also reside. Minimally, this resembles how "The Impromptu Tale" requires specific players to take over speaking when a particular term arises during play. However, Celnart may also have understood the first-person narration in "The Butterfly" to be a kind of storytelling.

Celnart's rules for "The Impromptu Romance" were blended with Tardieu-Denesle's 1817 example of play from "The Impromptu Tale" and translated into English as "Impromptu Romance, or, the Tale Continued" in Donald Walker's Games and Sports (1837).

Celnart's text was also translated into Spanish by D. Mariano de Rementería y Fica with a second edition appearing in 1839 as Manual Completo de Juegos de Sociedad, o Tertulia, y de Prendas. Google Books suggests there were further editions in 1852 and 1867.

Translation

The game which will occupy us now is like Butterfly and its excellent fellows. The interest it is likely to arouse does not make it more difficult to execute; on the contrary, because the career which it opens to the imagination of the players enables them to extend their ideas on the given subject at will, to mingle various digressions with it, to add various circumstances to it; they can easily discharge their task, which they have, moreover, the privilege of abbreviating as they see fit.

Here are the rules of the game: we will then give an example, by transcribing a short story; not (I repeat, and more than ever, since this short story is my work) to make a model of it, but a simple indication.

The person designated to start, recounts the adventures of a prince, of a knight, of an ambassador, or if she prefers to have scenes from everyday life, she takes her heroes from among the prefects of the provinces, the merchants of the capital, the prosecutors, etc.; she lends to each of them different tastes, opinions, passions, which circumstances bring into play, or which events overcome. We think rightly that the Impromptu Romance hardly goes without love; it is therefore necessary to include it, and a lot of it: but beware of coldness, exaggeration, commonplaces of adoration and despair, in short all the stuff of sentimentality and blandness. The person who starts the game takes a name analogous to the story they are going to tell. If it is about an ambassador, she is a secretary. If she speaks of a knight, she will be a squire; of any other hero, she is friend, journalist, author, etc., depending on the nature of the story. The players always take the names of the main characters of the novel, and of the objects that come up most frequently in the course of the narration. As soon as they hear pronounced the name under which one of them is designated, that player immediately takes the floor and continues the story in the same direction, but at their discretion. If they delay in replacing the narrator, they give a pledge: also the conductor of the game chooses, as much as possible, interesting and plausible events which, captivating attention, often cause them to fall into error.

An odd rule of this game is that in the middle of narrating of a moving scene, the narrator suddenly breaks off and points to one of the players; the latter must instantly provide him with a word absolutely opposite to that required by the direction of the sentence: the former is then obliged to sew this word as naturally as possible into his narrative. This contrast, this sudden difficulty increases the pleasure of the game, or at least its harvest in pledges. I will provide an example of this in the short story I mentioned above, which is:

Eliza, a story.

Names of characters and objects that often come up in the narrative:

First Lady: Eliza.
Second Lady: The invalid.
Third Lady: Youthfulness, etc.
First player: The friend.
Second player: Charles.
Third player: The doctor.
Fourth player: The priest, etc.

We can multiply the names according to the story; but, for the particulars of my narration, there are enough of them: we begin.

The friend. "A few more moments, and I shall have ceased to be: twenty years, some beauty, fortune, talents, I shall have lost everything ... without regret? ... Hey! what will I regret? What do these assets matter to me; what does life matter to me. Charles...

The second player.—Don't love me. Eliza ...

The first lady. Had uttered these first words calmly; but at the last, bitter tears covered her pale face. "Insane," she resumed, "why these tears! Ah! if he loved you, now would be the time to shed tears!"

Eliza joined to an imagination most lively, a heart most ... (Here, the narrator looks at the person who pleases him and points with his finger, while seeming to hesitate: this person, carried away by the story, answers sensitive, instead of the opposite word that she needed to supply, so she gives a pledge.)

The narrator resumes: A heart most sensitive, this painful energy, this constant courage that the poor woman employs in secret to tame the passions to which a man allows himself to be subjected. Friendship between her family and the parents of Charles ...

The second player.—Had made him known to the young girl: a frank character, a lofty spirit, a generous heart, had made him ... (The narrator pretends to hesitate, pointing at one of the people in the group, who responds: hate.)

The second player.—Yes, then to hate, because those qualities had made him cherish her too much in the beginning. But the coquette provokes feelings which she does not wish to share: an indifferent girl inspires them with her calm and her gaiety, indices of her coldness, and which leaves her all her charms; and she who truly loves, reserved, fearful, worried, is often despised; she sees him, struggles, despairs, loses her attractions in pain. Doubting then her means of pleasing, she moves away from the one she constantly wants to see, resumes her painful efforts, obtains from reason only the reflection of her madness, cries, is consumed, and still discovers charms in such a humiliating and fatal state. Such was for two years the fate of the sad lover. Finally, distance, forced exercises, the perpetual care to remove a too dear image from her thoughts, to stifle the slightest sigh, to recall her dignity, and to excite in her the affections of nature, restored to her a kind of calm; but her health seriously deteriorated. Alas! the fever of the soul not allowing art to stop that of the body, the crises multiplied, and the young invalid ...

The second lady advanced towards her last day: she hailed it as her deliverance, and found on her deathbed the joy which had ceaselessly fled her in the midst of the world and its pleasures. This joy did not last long: what ended it so soon? Was it her sisters' tears, her mother's awful despair, the horror of her destruction? It was much more, it was love! "O God!" she said to herself, "to suffer so much for Charles ..."

The second player, to die for him, and to not be able to say to him: "See how much I loved you!" This idea soon becomes desire, it soon becomes resolution: "Sir," said the dying girl to her doctor ...

The third player, who found himself alone with her for a moment, guarding her: "Sir, please tell me if my condition is hopeless." Her voice was moving, but her eye closed, and the doctor hesitated to answer: "Ah!" she resumed, "if you knew how much your consideration hurts me, you would spare me ... important arrangements depend on your answer ... —Mademoiselle ... your piety can satisfy tself (Elisa ...

The first lady: blushed) without all that, resumed the doctor, that no fears ... —Fears! ha! I only know one, it is not that of death ... Speak, speak; sir, am I going to die? You are silent ... I understand you. How many days do I have to live? —Mademoiselle ... —Please! —Well! you want it ... two days! —They will suffice, I thank you; especially since my condition leaves no hope! assure me well ... If I came back to life, great God! I would be dishonored, she added mentally. The terrifying progress of the illness gave her only too much confirmation of the words of the doctor.

The third player. We must hurry: Elisa ...

The first lady writes a letter. Oh! how much agitation this letter causes her! At every instant she is obliged to stop, to smell salts; but soon her complexion takes on color, her eyes come alive, her firm hand runs over the paper: it looks as if she has just regained all the strength of youthfulness ...

The third lady. From health ... (She folds her letter, sends it, and falls back without strength on her pillows, asking for the sacraments.) The priest ...

The fourth player. Finished applying the holy oils to the already cold feet of the dying girl when a distraught young man rushed into the apartment, in spite of the nurse who tried to hold him back: it was the friend ...

The first player. Too dear. Astonishment suspends the tears of the desolate family who question him with their looks: "Sir," he cries to the priest ...

The fourth player. Cease this painful ministry, fulfill a sweeter one... Yes, Elisa ...

The first lady. He continued, seizing the trembling hand that the invalid ...

The second lady. Tendered to him, yes, I will be your spouse! ... let's not waste our time. —Oh yes! she went on, with effort putting her hand to her heart, widowerhood is very near. —Cruel! ... alas! what did I say? it is I who must be accused; I misunderstood so much love, I misunderstood this noble heart which gave itself all to me; but at least, as soon as this inestimable gift is revealed to me, I accept it with transport, with intoxication! —While finishing these words, Charles ...

The fourth player, to obtain the nuptial blessing: he puts the question to the mother who gives her consent through the sobs that oppress her, and the sweetest ceremony takes the place of the cruellest. They are united: a detectable improvement manifests in the face of Elisa ...

The first lady. Her eyes are no longer dull and fixed, her lips lose that contraction, prelude to the agony which was already noticeable there; she can sit up. Charles transported, exclaims: "You are saved! love owed us this miracle! —Dear husband, she resumes, smiling sadly, have you never heard of the best harbinger of death? —Don't cry out, don't take your hand away; listen to me. —If I had wanted to forget the delicacy and dignity of my sex, I would not have waited until this moment to declare my love to you ... I waited until it had devoured my life; without that, would I have dared to write to you? I'm dying for loving you too much! Ah! pay at least a look of pity for the sacrifice of my life! —You all cry, ah! rather bless my fate; he is here, I see him sensible to my ills ... I can call him my husband ... it is too much happiness, and my soul ... I feel ... Charles ...

The second player. Charles, farewell! and the eternity like this instant ... that this kiss ends! ...

We feel that the workings of other romances cannot be modeled on this short story, and that the narrator can multiply the opportunities at will to have a word said contrary to his thought: we can also involve a greater number of players in the story.

Original Text

Le Roman impromptu

Le jeu qui va nous occuper maintenant est le jeu du Papillon, et autres semblables perfectionnés. L'interêt qu'il est susceptible d'exciter ne le rend pas d'une plus difficile exécution ; au contraire, car la carrière qu'il ouvre à l'imagination des joueurs leur permet d'étendre à volonté leurs idées sur le sujet donné, d'y mêler diverses digressions, d'y ajouter diverses circonstances ; ils peuvent aisément s'acquitter de leur tâche, qu'ils ont, au surplus, le privilège d'abreger comme il leur convient.

Voici la règle du jeu : nous en donnerons ensuite un exemple, en transcrivant une petite nouvelle ; non (je le répète, et plus que jamais, puisque cette nouvelle est mon œuvre) pour en faire un modèle, mais une simple indication.

La personne désignée pour commencer, raconte les aventures d'un prince, d'un chevalier, d'un ambassadeur, ou si elle aime mieux prendre les scènes de la vie commune, elle prend ses héros parmi les préfets de province, les négocians de la capitale, les procureurs, etc. ; elle leur prête à chacun des goûts, des opinions, des passions diverses, que mettent en jeu les circonstances, ou que maîtrisent les événemens. On pense bien que le Roman impromptu ne va guère sans amour ; il en faut donc mettre, et beaucoup : mais gare la froideur, l'exagération, les lieux communx d'adoration et de désespoir, enfin tout l'attirail de la sensiblerie et de la fadeur. La personne qui commence le jeu prend un nom analogue à l'histoire qu'elle va raconter. S'agit-il d'un ambassadeur, elle est un secrétaire. Parle-t-elle d'un chevalier, elle sera écuyer ; de tout autre héros, elle est ami, journaliste, auteur, etc., suivant la nature du récit. Tous les jours les joueurs prennent les noms des principaux personnages du roman, et des objets qui reviennent le plus fréquemment dans le cours de la narration. Dès que l'on entend prononcer le nom sous lequel on est désigné, on prend aussitôt la parole, et l'on continue le récit dans le même sense, mais à son gré. Si l'on tarde à remplacer le narrateur, on donne un gage : aussi le conducteur du jeu choisit-il, autant que possible, des faits intéressans et vraisemblables qui, captivant l'attention, les font souvent tomber en faute.

Une règle bizarre de ce jeu, c'est qu'au milieu du récit d'une scène pathétique, le narrateur s'interrompt tout à coup et désigne l'un des joueurs ; celui-ci-doit lui fournir à l'instant un mot absolutment opposé à celui qu'exige le sens de la phrase : le premier alors est obligé de coudre ce mot le plus naturellement possible à son récit. Ce contraste, cette difficulté soudaine augmentent l'agrément du jeu, ou du moins sa récolte en gages. J'en fournirai l'exemple dans la petite nouvelle dont j'ai parlé plus haut, et que voici :

Éliza, nouvelle.

Noms des personnages et des objets qui reviennent souvent dans le récit :

Première dame : Eliza.
Deuxième dame : Malade.
Troisième dame : Jeunesse, etc.
Premier joueur : L'ami.
Deuxième joueur : Charles.
Troisième joueur : Le médecin.
Quatrième joueur : Le prêtre, etc.

On peut multiplier les noms d'après l'histoire ; mais, pour l'intelligences de ma narration, il y en a assez : nous commençons.

L'ami. « Encore quelques momens, et j'aurai cessé d'être : vingt ans, quelque beauté, de la fortune, des talens, j'aurai tout perdu ... sans regret ? ... Eh ! que regretterai-je ? Que m'importent ces biens ; que m'importe la vie. Charles ...

Le deuxième joueur. — Ne m'aime point. Eliza ...

La première dame. Avait prononcé ces premières paroles avec calme ; mais aux dernières, des pleurs amers couvrirent son pâle visage. « Insensée, reprit-elle, pourquoi ces pleurs ! Ah ! s'il t'aimait, ce serait maintenait qu'il faudrait répandre des larmes ! »

Eliza joignait à l'imagination la plus vive, au cœur le plus ... (Ici, le narrateur regarde la personne qu'il lui plaît d'indiquer du doigt, en paraissant hésiter : cette personne, entraînée par le récit, répond sensible, au lieu du mot opposé qu'elle devait fournir, elle donne un gage.)

Le narrateur reprend : Au cœur le plus sensible, cette douloureuse énergie, ce courage constant que la faible femme emploie en secret pour dompter des passions auxquelles l'homme se laisse assujettir. Des relations d'amitié entre sa famille et les parens de Charles ...

Le deuxième joueur. — L'avaient fait connaître à la jeune fille : un caractère franc, un esprit élevé, un cœur généreux, lui avaient fait ... (Le narrateur feint d'hésiter, indique du doigt une des personnese de la société, qui répond : haïr.)

Le deuxième joueur. — Oui, haïr ensuite, parce que ces qualités le lui avaient d'abord fait trop chérir. Mais la coquette provoque des sentimens qu'elle ne veut point partager : l'indifférente les inspire par son calme et sa gaîté, indices de sa froideur, et qui lui laisse tous ses charmes ; et celle qui aime véritablement, réservée, craintive, inquiète, est souvent dédaignée ; elle le voit, combat, se désespère, perd ses attraits dans la douleur. Doutant alors de ses moyens de plaire, elle s'éloigne de celui qu'elle voudrait sans cesse voir, reprend ses pénibles efforts, n'obtient de la raison que la vue de sa folie, pleure, se consume, et trouve encore des charmes dans un état si humiliant et si fatal. Tel fut pendant deux années le sort de la triste amant. Enfin l'éloignement, des études forcées, le soin perpétuel d'écarter une trop chère image de sa pensée, d'étouffer le moindre soupir, de rappeler sa dignité, et d'exciter en elle les affections de la nature, lui rendirent une sorte de calme ; mais sa santé s'altéra gravement. Hélas ! le fièvre de l'âme ne permettant point à l'art d'arrêter celle du corps, les crises se multiplièrent, et la jeune malade ...

La deuxième dame s'avança vers son dernier jour : elle le salua comme sa délivrance, et trouva sur son lit de mort la joie qui l'avait fuie sans cesse au milieu du monde et des plaisirs. Cette joie dura peu : qui l'a finie sitôt ? était-ce les larmes de ses sœurs, l'affreux désespoir de sa mère, l'horreur de sa destruction ? C'était bien plus, c'était l'amour ! « O Dieu ! se disait-elle, tant souffrir pour Charles ... »

Le deuxième joueur, mourir pour lui, et ne pouvoir lui dire : « Voyez combien je vous aimais ! » Cette idée est bientôt désir, elle est bientôt résolution : « Monsieur, dit la jeune mourante à son médecin ... »

Le troisième joueur, qui se trouvait un moment seul avec elle et la garde : « Monsieur, dites-moi, en grâce, si mon état est désespéré. » Sa voix était émue, mais son œil ferme, et le docteur hésitait à répondre : « Ah ! reprit-elle, si vous saviez combien ces ménagemens me font de mal, vous me les épargneriez ... d'importantes dispositions dépendent de votre réponse ... —Mademoiselle ... votre piété peut se satisfaire (Elisa ...

La première dame : rougit) sans pour cela, reprit le docteur, qu'aucune crainte ... — Des craintes ! ah ! je n'en connais qu'une, ce n'est pas celle de la mort ... Parlez, parlez ; monsieur, vais-je mourir ? Vous vous taisez ... je vous comprends. Combien ai-je de jours à vivre ? — Mademoiselle ... — Par pitié ! — Eh bien ! vous le voulez ... deux jours ! — Ils suffiront, je vous rends grâce ; surtout que mon état ne laisse aucun espoir ! assurez-le moi bien ... Si je revenais à la vie, grand Dieu ! je serais déshonorée, ajouta-t-elle mentalement. » Les progrès effrayans du mal ne lui donnèrent que trop la confirmation des paroles du médecin.

Le troisième joueur. Il faut se hâter : Elisa.

La première dame écrit une lettre. Oh ! combien cette lettre lui cause d'agitation ! A chaque instant elle est obligée de s'arrêter, de respirer des sels ; mais bientôt son teint se colore, ses yeux s'animent, sa main raffermie court sur le papier : on dirait qu'elle vient de repredendre toutes les forces de la jeunesse ...

La troisième dame. De la santé ... (Elle plie sa lettre, l'envoie, et retombe sans force sur ses oreillers, en demandant les sacremens.) Le prêtre ...

Le quatrième joueur. Achevait d'apposer les saintes huiles sur les pieds déjà froids de la mourante, lorsqu'un jeune homme éperdu s'élance dans l'appartement, malgré la garde-malade qui s'efforce de le retenir : c'était l'ami ...

Le premier joueur. Trop cher. L'étonnement suspend les pleurs de la famille désolée qui l'interroge par ses regards : « Monsieur, crie-t-il au prêtre ...

La quatrième joueur. Cessez ce douloureux ministère, remplissez-en un plus doux ... Oui, Elisa ...

La première dame. Continua-t-il en saisissant la main tremblante que la malade ...

La dexième dame. Lui tendait, oui, je vais être ton époux ! ... ne perdons pas de temps. — Oh oui ! reprit-elle en portant avec effort sa main sur son cœur, le veuvage est bien près. — Cruelle ! ... hélas ! que dis-je ? c'est moi qu'il faut accuser ; j'ai méconnu tant d'amour, j'ai méconnu ce noble cœur qui se donnait tout à moi ; mais du moins, dès que ce don inestimable m'est révélé, je l'accepte avec transport, avec ivresse ! — En finissant ces mots, Charles ... »

Le quatrième joueur, pour obtenir la bénédiction nuptiale : celui-ci interpelle la mère qui donne son consentement à travers les sanglots qui l'oppressent, et la plus douce cérémonie succède à la plus cruelle. Ils sont unis : un mieux sensible se manifeste sur le visage d'Elisa ...

La première dame. Ses yeux ne sont plus ternes et fixes, ses lèvres perdent cette contraction, prélude de l'agonie qui s'y remarquait déjà ; elle peut demeurer sur son séant. Charles transporté, sécrie : « Tu es sauvée ! l'amour nous devait ce miracle ! — Cher époux, reprend-elle en souriant tristement, n'as-tu jamais entendu parler du mieux avant-coureur de la mort ? — Ne te récries pas, ne retires pas la main ; écoute-moi. — Si j'avais voulu mettre en oubli la délicatesse et la dignité de mon sexe, je n'aurais pas attendu jusqu'à ce moment pour te déclarer mon amour ... j'ai attendu qu'il eut dévoré ma vie ; sans cela, eussé-je osé t'écrire ? Je meurs pour t'avoir trop aimé ! Ah ! paie au moins d'un regard de pitié le sacrifice de ma vie ! — Vous pleurez tous, ah ! bénissez plutôt mon sort ; il est là, je le vois sensible à mes maux ... je puis le nommer mon époux ... c'est trop de bonheur, et mon âme ... Je sens ... Charles ...

La deuxième joueur. Charles, adieu ! et l'éternité comme cet instant ... que ce baiser achève ! ... »

On sent que la marche des autre romans ne peut être calquée sur cette nouvelle, et que le narrateur peut à volonté multiplier les occasions de faire dire un mot contraire à sa pensée : on peut aussi faire participier un plus grand nombre de joueurs au récit.


Return to Early Collaborative Games of Fantasy and Imagination.