Games [1667]


Introduction

"Games," a.k.a. "Les Jeux, servant de préface à Mathilde," is a preface to the novel Mathilde by Madeleine de Scudéry. Page numbers are in square brackets; the original and modernized texts in French follow the translation. De Scudéry's portrayal of a group of friends randomizing tasks of brief, impromptu invention--poetry, ekphrasis, debate resolutions, etc.--exemplifies the conversational yet literary nature of many early jeux d'esprit. Her text is also notable for mentioning on page 25 the game of the Romance, a collaborative storytelling game represented in greater detail by Charlotte-Rose de Caumont de La Force in 1701.

Translation

[1]

GAMES

SERVING AS A PREFACE

TO MATHILDE

We set out from Paris in two carriages on the finest day of Autumn to go to one of those pleasant houses which are on the banks of the Seine on the side where it descends. We were five women, and there were four men with us, whose minds were certainly very suitable for making company very agreeable. We established as a [2] rule of our society during that day to think only of what could amuse us, to banish all thoughts of business: we furthermore wanted, that if there was someone among the men who were with us, who was in love, that he make a truce with his passion, in order to have only tranquil pleasures: we also resolved not to play, so as to avoid the sorrow of having lost, and we we wanted so badly to renounce ourselves, that we changed our names in jest: we did not, however, first take those novel-based names which are so easy to find; and a man of the company having told us that in Italy in the famous Academies, the individuals who composed them took names which marked something [3] of their mood, or which had some other relation to them, we sought either to praise or blame ourselves with our designations. One of my friends was called the Indifferent, because in fact she loves little: another the Melancholic, although her melancholy is charming: the third the Playful: the fourth was called the Incredulous, because we have never been able to persuade her that we have had either love or friendship for her. One of the men was called the Obstinate: Another the Complaisant, who indeed deserves that name. The third called himself the Uncertain, having never been able to agree on what would make him happy. And the last was called the Ambitious, because [4] those who know him well believe that he would always sacrifice all things to his fortune. At first this way of blaming and praising in naming the company amused us and served as a basis for waging one of those innocent wars which are always joyful, and which end in esteem and friendship when it is between reasonable people. But having noticed that we had some difficulty in finding such new names, we took some from Cyrus [i.e. the novel Artamène, or Cyrus the Great] and Clélie [i.e. the novel Clélie] which had some relation to these various temperaments. The beautiful Playful was called Plotine, the Obstinate Herminius, the Ambitious took the name of Themiste, that of Artimas was given to the Uncertain, [5] the beautiful Indifferent was called Cleocrite, the Melancholic Noromate, the Complaisant Meriandre: but for the beautiful Incredulous, no name was found that suited her, and they called her Philiste. The amiable Plotine says that what made it impossible to find the beautiful Incredulous in all the novels, is that it was not likely that a beautiful person did not believe easily enough in being loved. However, added this amiable woman, I see very well that the name they give me makes me understand very gently that I am too gay; but besides the fact that I am persuaded that one must always follow one's natural humor, it is because I find myself very happy to be by temperament what everyone [6] should be by reason. I understand as well as you, said the beautiful Noromate, that the name I bear today reproaches me that I am usually a little too serious; but as my melancholy does not go as far as grief and as I have only as much as is necessary to have not to laugh at everything, and to be capable of secrecy and friendship, I console myself with the languor with which they make war on me. As for me, said Meriandre, I was well aware that in naming me they pretended to praise me, although they intended to blame me for excessive complaisance; but to justify myself and to avenge myself, I wish with all my heart that all who blame me will find a contradiction every day of their lives, in order to make them know [7] that it is still better to be a little too complaisant than not to be at all. As far as I am concerned, said Herminius, I renounce complaisance both by temperament and by reason: one must yield to Laws and Sovereigns without reasoning; but in all other things, one must maintain one's opinion with courage, and yield only to the truth when one knows it. But, he added, the beautiful Cleocrite will not be of my opinion: we otherwise agree, she said, and I find that it is much better to stop ourselves from arguing, to allow others what they want, and to believe what one wants, than to undertake to dispute against everyone when even one is right. Mainly, says the Uncertain Artimas, [8] since there is so much uncertainty both in the things one says and in the things one thinks. As for me, said the charming Philiste, I am blamed the most unjustly in the world, for I have no incredulity except in love and in friendship. I believe as easily as one wants, all the news that one tells me; but I confess in good faith that I find it very hard to believe that people love me, and I don't think I'm wrong: for there are few people in the world who know how to love, and I even believe myself able to boldly assure you that no one ever knows very precisely to what point he was loved; there is always ambiguity. Those who love themselves very much easily believe that they are followed and loved as much as they love themselves. But [9] when you don't want to let yourself be deceived, you don't trust your own merit so much and you distrust others more. We do not at all believe that we find sincere and tender love and friendship in the hearts of all those who speak of it; on the contrary, we tend to believe that there is none, or that there is hardly any; and if it were true that I would sometimes do injustice to someone, I would rather be the one to do it in this encounter than suffer it, although in all other things it is better to suffer it than do it. But what most of the time makes it easy for us to believe that we are loved enough is that we hardly want to love, and there are assuredly only people who would be capable of a great friend- [10] ship, who can notice well the faults of vulgar affections. This is why, to make no mistake about it, I do not easily persuade myself that people love me, I am no less civil nor less sociable, I do not accuse anyone in particular, I regard lukewarm, unfaithful, or frivolous affections like faults of the world in general, and I do not fail to believe that there is esteem, and a certain habitual friendship and propriety which makes society agreeable. But for completely sincere, tender, and unique friendships, I don't believe in any, or I hardly believe in them; and that is why I praise the ambitious man for having abandoned himself to ambition where sincere friendship is not necessary. What, [11] the ambitious Themiste abruptly resumed, you believe that ambition is incompatible with friendship; that which makes Heroes, and without whom Virtue would languish? It is a passion so closely resembling glory that very often they are taken for each other; a reasonable Ambition does not put in the heart the desire to be rich, it puts there the desire of being great, of surpassing others in all things, of standing out, of pleasing one's Prince, and of seeking Fortune by all honest ways, either in arms or in letters. It is even necessary that an ambitious person, as I understand one, has friends and serves them: because when you serve no one, it also happens that no one serves you. It seems to me, I say laughing [12] to the whole company, that it is a rather pleasant thing to think that we have all left Paris to come and each give our eulogy. Everyone laughed at the remark I had made, and we stopped praising or apologizing. The place where we were was pleasant, we took a walk before dinner: the meal was excellent and clean: there was a positively charming concert of viols and harpsichords: afterwards Noromate sang two passionate airs almost as well as one can sing: Plotine and Philiste danced little dances with two of the men of the company: they spoke of a hundred pleasant things, in which each maintained their opinion, according to their names and moods. But finally, after the conversation had lasted [13] some time, some suggested going to a large room with a better view, another said that it would be better to go for a ride in a carriage, this opinion was contradicted, and a Lady maintained that when one went to a country house for only one day, it was better to go for a walk. That is good, said Plotine, smiling, when one intends to separate oneself from the company to have a private conversation with someone who pleases more than all the rest; but beyond that taking a carriage ride is worth just as much. I assure you, added Philiste, that most of the time these people you see separating themselves from others don't know what to say to each other when they are apart. As for me, says Meriandre, [14] when I am in company like this I always hold that all the pleasures are well chosen, and I accept easily whatever is offered to me. In my private life, Cleocrite told him, I do out of indifference what you do out of obliging complaisance for your friends. And as far as I'm concerned, said Artimas, I've done more to want nothing than to consider whether I want one thing rather than another; for no sooner have I persuaded myself that I have chosen, than I blame my choice, and no longer want what I wanted. But perhaps, said Plotine, you don't want to be here anymore. Everyone laughs at what this lovely woman said. Oh Madam! replied Artimas pleasantly, it is my mind which [15] is undecided, but my heart is not at all; and as there are people here whom I love very dearly, I am delighted to be here, and I know of no irresolution on that. I am convinced, said Herminius, that it is necessary to make up your mind about all sorts of things, and to make a choice, even among pleasures. Ah for pleasures, I cried, you are making the greatest mistake in the world if you believe that it is necessary to choose pleasures that cannot be changed: for from the moment we begin to speak until 'one ceases to live, pleasures change, and must change. We play at them in childhood, we love diversions, and we seek them with eagerness in beautiful youth: we suffer them [16] without looking for them in the age that follows that one, and then finally we undertake others in later life. I even believe, I added, that at the same time and on the same day one can be amused and bored by the same thing; long pleasures cease to be so pleasant, one must neither have plays too long nor music too long, the ball when one has danced too much ceases to amuse, long jokes are boring, and it is precisely in pleasures that it takes variety and intervals, and that the heart and mind need to relax. Speaking in general, we see that men may be able to content themselves with a single occupation: a soldier is content with his profession, a magistrate with his, [17] a man of letters likewise, a great Painter paints all his life without getting bored, a Sculptor always makes statues and only worries when he has no occasion to do so, and so with all the other occupations of life, large and small, according to different conditions: but no man has ever had one unique pleasure. This is why we usually speak in our language of pleasures, and not of pleasure, when we want to speak of the amusements and entertainments of which we are speaking here, and not of this interior movement of joy and satisfaction which that they can produce in us, each secretly supposing that one thing alone cannot produce it forever, and that change, variety, and novelty make up the principal [18] part of them. So if someone wants to choose only one pleasure for his whole life, I believe he will soon come to the end of having none of them. I am completely of the opposite opinion, says Plotine, and you do not take note that each of these pleasures of which we speak has an almost infinite variety and extent, which are discovered every day more and more by those who attach themselves entirely to them, and always make it new to them, though always the same. If so, resumed Herminius, then one must choose well those to which one wishes to attach oneself. I assure you, added the melancholy Noromate, that this word 'choice' is too serious for that, and in my opinion, pleasures must be followed according to one's inclination: for I suppose that the pleasures of which we speak, are properly [19] innocent pleasures; thus, not having to deliberate whether they are just or unjust, I conclude that we must take them according to whether chance offers them, and according to whether they relate to our mood: for in the end, there is nothing sure to decide on that. Despite my uncertainty, said Artimas, I know that the beautiful Noromate is right. Is it not, he added, that whoever might suggest that I go hunting in bad weather, as determined hunters do, I would rather go to the Theater. No one is saying, said Plotine then, that you are obliged to accept all the pleasures that are offered to you: for as for me, I do not like fishing any more than you like hunting, and I have never understood that it was a great pleasure to see a large number [20] of fish fighting in nets, muddying the water, letting themselves be caught without being able to resist. Knowing that you dance perfectly well, said Philiste, I imagine that you prefer the ball to all pleasures. The ball is assuredly a very pleasant thing, replied Plotine; but as ladies only dance with good grace in society for a certain number of years, I am already thinking what other pleasure I shall seek in two or three years. Music is one that can last a lifetime, says Meriandre. I agree, replied Plotine; but it seems to me that when a woman who has been quite beautiful no longer hears sung the songs that have been made for her, and the admirable Lambert and the charming Hilaire no longer sing before her anythig but [21] new airs, made for budding beauties, she no longer takes much pleasure in them, and I am convinced that those who no longer have a part in it, and who judge that they can no longer have any of it, no longer love Music so much. But at least for Theater, said Themiste, agree that it is a pleasure for all ages, all seasons, and all moods: for there are serious poems, others more playful. It is a picture of all the passions; the beauties of history and fable are often joined together; vice is punished, and virtue rewarded; and everyone can find something there according to his taste: Mainly, interrupted Plotina with a smile, when one has a heart filled with ambition, since [22] it is there that one sees all the great events of History; but for me, I sincerely admit that although I like to see all the beautiful works, especially when they are new, I would not like it to be my only pleasure, and it would cease to be if I never had another. As for me, says Cleocrite, I take them as chance gives them to me without worrying about it, I neither seek them nor flee them, I believe that Fortune can be sought and found; but it seems to me that pleasures fly away from those who seek them with so much eagerness, and that the trouble we make for ourselves over that makes them bought too dearly. You are right, beautiful Cleocrite, Artimas told her, it very often happens that great premeditated pleasures are [23] boring in the end, and it has happened to me several times in my life to amuse myself and to be bored by turns at one of those long festivals, where all the amusements are crowded, such that they are rather made to show off the magnificence of the great princes who give them, than for the pleasure of those who are part of them. As I am accused of never contradicting anyone, said Meriandre, I find myself very embarrassed today by seeing so many people whom I esteem have different feelings, and I almost want to stop talking, in order to not be unworthy of the name I have been given today. And to merit that of obstinate, says Herminius, which I have been given without too much foundation, I maintain that one must choose in all [24] things, and consider once in one's life, what all the pleasures have of good or bad. But tell me, I interrupted, if you put games in general among the pleasures. No, he replied, laughing, I put them among the passions, and the whole company finding that he was right, they did not examine that one. Just as well, says Artimas, one would run the risk of displeasing too many people if someone took it into their heads to place blame on gaming. Believe me, said Plotine, we do not amuse ourselves by blaming anyone for pleasures, there cannot be too many of them, let the hunters love the hunt, the music to the tender souls, the Theater to those who love beautiful things, the dance to those who dance well, the walk and the conversation to those who have gallant spirits, [25] superb parties to those who can give them, carousels, ring races, and other great pleasures to great Princes, and do not condemn even those who could amuse themselves by playing with hazelnuts. From what I see, said the beautiful Noromate, you don't blame those who amuse themselves by playing parlor games, like the game of Proverbs, sighs, the oracle, the Romance, the disconnected word, the fountains, paintings, and several others where you don't need so much wit. I take care not to condemn them, says Plotine, and I assure you that I have played them two or three times in my life, with great joy; but I look at these sorts of things as an amusement, rather than as [26] a pleasure: one would not send an invitation to play at parlor games, as one sends an invitation for the Ball and the Theater: two people alone will not dream of playing at Proverbs, as they play Imperial. But when a large enough number of people are together, when a certain spirit of joy reigns in the company, and when, being unable either to talk seriously, or to walk about, one simply tries to banter with some sort of wit, I do not disapprove of parlor games, provided they are taken for what they are. But, resumed Herminius, if we take them for what they are, we will take them for trifles which should not occupy reasonable people, and I would as much like to see a great [27] Architect spend his time making a castle of cards as children do, than to see clever people playing at 'good cat good rat.' Themiste, knowing that it would please Plotine to support games, opposed Herminius, and told him that what was play was not called occupation, and that the Proverbs which he mocked were formerly an invention which great men had found to fix the truth of all things, and to spread it agreeably in the world. That was good, says Herminius, in the childhood of Morality; but today it is so old that we hardly know it anymore, we can spend our whole life without proverbs and without playing a game that forces us to remember them. All [28] the Ladies and other men enjoying this dispute as witnesses, they were allowed to speak without interruption. I know very well, said Themiste, that one spends one's whole life very easily playing at Proverbs; but I maintain that one cannot do without joy and amusement, and that the games of wit which you blame so much, are as old as the world; that the great Kings and the great Princesses were amused by them; that the wisest men among the Greeks practiced them in their feasts; that the ancient Romans did not ignore them; that Count Balthasar in his perfect Courtisan [Baldassare Castiglione's The Book of the Courtier], who passes for the model of politeness, speaks of the game of each inventing a game, of the game of the Follies of each player, and of several [29] others. Three or four Italian authors have made whole volumes of it; there are even some among the French: the games of Siena were famous, the rebuses, the riddles, the mottoes, aren't these games properly speaking? Believe me, my dear Obstinate, continued the Ambitious, there are more games in the world than you think, everything is near to being a trifle: that's why we don't subtract since there would be too much to subtract. But, interrupted Plotine, I would still like to know when it was decided to invent these sorts of games of wit. Firstly, said Herminius, mockingly, I believe that the game of Corbillon was invented by the first Poets, who having great difficulty in putting [30] reason into rhyme, accustomed children to play that game. Although you say that to scorn games, resumed Themiste, I find it well thought out, and I want to believe it to be true. But to answer what the beautiful Plotine asks me, I will say that the games originated in Lydia, and that they are much older than the oldest Historian, who is called the Father of History. In fact, this famous Author reports that during a fairly severe famine, the Lydians could find no other invention to prevent the people from suffering and to save food, than to invent games which occupied them, and entertained them; and I believe that it is this origin which introduced a manner [31] of speaking which is still among the people, where they want to say that a man is passionately fond of gaming, He loses, they say, eating and drinking. So what seems like a trifle to you has been a great remedy for the greatest evil in life. But to talk about it more seriously, we learn from this same Historian, that Amasis King of Egypt who lived in the time of Cyrus, amused himself with games of wit: indeed, he sent one day to a man whose name resisted time and came to us, to ask him what he had to answer the King of Ethiopia, who asked him if he knew what he could do to drink all the sea. Assuring him that if he could find something reasonable to [32] answer him, he would give him several cities, and that if he could find nothing good to say, he would lose as many as he could win. The King of Egypt made this proposal by a letter which was carried during a feast given by the King of Corinth to the wisest men of Greece, he who received it as a game answered it in the same way; but he did it very ingeniously: for he said to the Envoy of this Prince, You will tell the King your master, that he has only to ask the King of Ethiopia to cause all the rivers to stop first, so that he drinks nothing more and after that he will do what he wishes. It is easy to judge that this request was a game of wit. Eumetis daughter of King of Corinth also acquired [33] a great reputation for knowing how to explain the most difficult Enigmas. Finally, Kings, Philosophers, the Greeks, the ancient Romans, and the new Italy, did not despise games of wit: it should not therefore be found strange that we sometimes amuse ourselves with them. If you faithfully reported, replied Herminius, all the gallantries of the time of Amasis King of Egypt, you would see that we would hardly accommodate ourselves to their customs. I agree, said Themiste, that we do not follow them in everything: I even don't mind that we do not entertain ourselves with the same games that entertained them; but I only ask that you confess that the games are as old as the world, that persons of great quality, of great [34] wit and of great virtue have been entertained by them, that in very gallant Courts we had fun with them, and that we can still be entertained by them. If I were believed, said the beautiful Plotine then, we would play them presently. I wouldn't deserve the name I bear, said the complaisant Meriandre, if I were able to contradict you. And as for me, said the obstinate Herminius, I so often deserve mine, that even though I do not yield, I am willing not to oppose myself to the beautiful Plotine. I have already explained myself enough, said Cleocrite, to make sure that no one doubts that I want everything they want. As my name, said then the incredulous Philiste, obliges me to nothing, I consent to trying out whether I will amuse myself: for I have never played. I have played [35] like anyone else, said Noromate, and I was always bored. I want thus to undertake, said Themiste, to see to it that you are not bored. Please, said Artimas, leave me the freedom to doubt, if I will have been amused or bored: for my foresight does not go so far as to know what will be. I don't mind, said Themiste: but the company must allow me to invent a game: because novelty is a charm in all pleasures. All the company having consented to this proposal, he pondered for a moment, and then he prescribed the rules of it: First, he said, I will put onto slips of paper various characters of people, or various other things according to my fancy. I should roll up these notes, I should mix them up, [36] and after having mixed them well in a vase, all those of the company should be obliged to speak on the subject that their note indicated for them, and as for me who will be the master of the game, I will not draw a slip of paper; but after having listened to all that each will have said, I will be obliged to speak in my turn, to praise those who have spoken well, and to blame those who have not done well. And since chance always acts without choice, I understand that it can produce rather pleasant effects, in this game, where one will sometimes be obliged to speak about what one does not know, or against one's own feelings. Although I fear a little, said Plotine, not coming out with my honor from a game, where I foresee that [37] a lot of wit is needed, I consent to this one being played. Everyone having given voice to their assent, the notes were made, on which the following was written.

A good and a wicked love letter.
Why a handsome fool is more foolish than another.
A man of false bravery.
A troublesome scholar.
An ignoramus who makes a skilful man.
A story.
A tale.
The description of a beautiful country house.
A man who talks too much.
A beautiful yet ridiculous mind.
The difference between the flatterer and the complaisant.
[38]
A hypocrite,
Some verses of an Elegy.
A pompous nonsense, which can deceive mediocre minds.
A rebus.
A song.
A man who is annoyed by everything.
A man who does not know how to live.
To speak against love.
To defend love.
An enigma.
A wish.
All the various characters of coquettes.
A Madrigal.
A zealot.
A man of bravery and brutality.
A motto.
A complainer who laments everything.
A playful indifferent who doesn't worry about anything.
That you always need a confidant in love.
[39]
That there should be no confidant in love.

After all these notes were written, the beautiful Noromate asked why there were more than there were people in the company. It is in order, replied the master of the game, to make the chance greater, that there be more variety in the subjects on which the lot may fall, and that consequently one cannot prepare oneself on anything. The company being satisfied with this reason, and having found all the notes ingeniously filled, they mixed them up and distributed them according to where they were seated; but they were not allowed to see their notes until they were ready to speak. The beautiful Plotine being in the first place opened hers, [40] and found there the following, Why a handsome fool is more foolish than another.

I assure you, said Playful [Plotine], laughing, that I am much happier than I expected: for I was very much afraid of being obliged to build a house, and that I might confuse the corridors and the cornices, the bases and the capitals. I was also strangely apprehensive of having to speak against Love: for I find it rather necessary for the decency of the world. I therefore give thanks to Fortune, for compelling me to speak on a subject which is in according with my feelings, and on which there is little to say. It remains certain, however, that beauty is a great advantage in all sorts of things, except to a foolish man. Among women, beauty excuses [41] many flaws; but among men it redoubles bad qualities. A beautiful woman without any merit, adorns the ball and the course; she need only not speak to be amiable--it is at least a beautiful picture: but a handsome fool is a hundred times more intolerable than if he were not handsome. The reason that I can imagine is that a man who is not well made does not attract attention, you don't expect anything, he is saved in the press of the crowd, without anyone realizing his foolishness; we don't think about it, and even if we think about it, as his face didn't promise anything good, we don't blame him for having deceived people. But when you see a handsome fool with a beautiful blond wig, the complexion of a beautiful [42] Lady, beautiful blue eyes that say nothing, a silly laugh that only serves to show beautiful teeth, a great stature which has no license, a stupid and bland physiognomy, signifying not what this is, basking in a stupid glory without foundation: it must be admitted that a handsome fool of this species is more stupid than if he was not as pretty, and that he bores much more; because we resent having been deceived for a moment; because nothing is so bad together as beauty and stupidity. It is really a large and magnificent gate which promises a Palace, and beyond which one finds only a wretched cabin without any furniture. I even believe that one can also say that a man is not obliged to be handsome; but [43] that he is obliged to have wit, and to know how to live; so that when we find quite the contrary, and find one who has the beauty of a woman, and does not have the wit of a man, we are very much put off. And to go further beyond the terms of my note, I will add that a handsome fool when he is old is even more foolish with his old charms than when he is young, because there is no longer any hope that he is correcting his foolishness. There is even more than one kind of beautiful fool; but those whom I put in the first rank are handsome fools, audacious and languid all together, who listen to each other, even when they say nothing, who never think, neither about what they are told nor about what they say, who admire each other without [44] knowing each other, and who do not fail to carry their beauty and their stupidity everywhere to inconvenience reasonable people.

The beautiful Plotine having ceased to speak, everyone thought they knew someone of the character she had represented, and each wanted to whisper a name in her ear, but the master of the game imposed silence, and said that it was necessary never to make a game of other people's faults, that fools of this kind were easy to know, and that there was no need to name them. Then Philiste opened her note, and found that it was up to her to show the difference between the flatterer and the complaisant. This beautiful person pondered for a moment, and then spoke in these terms:

Chance has no doubt [45] been met happily enough in forcing me to speak of the difference between honest complaisance and flattery. I have such a great aversion for all flatterers in general, that this aversion will perhaps take the place of my wit, and make me better discover the baseness of flattery; at least I know that I don't have in me what makes most everywhere suffer flatterers. For in the end it remains a constant that one forgives nothing so easily as flattery said from good grace, and this doubtless comes from the fact that you are your own foremost flatterer, and that you nearly always say to yourself more good about yourself than others say and should say; so that flattery is always closer to what we [46] think of ourselves than to the truth, and has always a secret intelligence in our heart, which we must defy. Those who like to be flattered esteem themselves too much, and flatterers ordinarily become such, because they feel that they do not have enough merit or enough virtue to please or acquire credit without the help of flattery, and one can say that they have a poor opinion both of themselves and of others. But before distinguishing reasonable complaisance from that which is not so, it may not be inappropriate to paint a light picture of a flatterer. His first quality is to renounce the truth unscrupulously, and never to use it; of being incapable of any friendship, of loving only his pleasure [47] and his interest, of speaking only in relation to himself, of never committing himself except to Fortune: he has no particular temperament, he becomes what his interest requires him to be, serious with those who are serious, cheerful with the playful; but never unhappy with those who become so, for he abandons them as soon as he can recognize that Fortune is leaving them. So I am of the opinion of a friend of mine who said speaking of flatterers,

The misery of the other awakens their malice
Instead of arousing their pity:
To deserve their hatred and their familiarity,
It's enough that we don't have auspicious Fortune.
This blind Goddess is mistress in their hearts:
[48]
Of all those she raises they are worshippers,
On all those whom she strikes they declare war.
Injustice and fraud have charms for them.
They are the horror of Heaven, the monsters of the earth,
And the last misfortune of all the unfortunate.

But to come back to where I was, the flatterer is never uniform in his feelings, he is capable of contradicting himself endlessly, of entertaining all sorts of impressions, none of which are particular to him; he wants everything we want, and never wants anything except for his purpose. He makes virtues out of all vices when he pleases; he is as unbearable to those who are below him [49] as he is submissive to those he needs: for as he spends his whole life flattering those who are above his condition, he wants to be flattered by those below. Dissimulation is his ordinary companion, he has no country, no parents, no friends, and often no religion. True flatterers are not satisfied with praising those who do not deserve to be praised: but to please the very people whose vices they change into virtues, they change as much as they can the virtues of others into vices; and slander and calumny are very often employed by a true flatterer, to please those to whom he pays court. He never warns his friends of the mistakes they make during their good fortune; [50] but if they fall, he is the first to insult their misfortune, in order to make himself agreeable to their successors. Finally, I boldly maintain that a flatterer is the most cowardly of all men: but among all flatterers, those who approach the Great are the meanest and the most to be feared; and one can say of flattery in this encounter, that by attaching itself to the Great, it sometimes acts like that creeping weed which covers the walls, which it destroys afterwards: for it is certain that flattery, by deceiving the Great with regard to themselves, very often makes them unjust, and then unhappy. Flattery is not only dangerous in Courts, it is [51] so in friendship, in love, and in all sorts of conditions: for there are flattering Lovers, as well as Friends and Courtiers. There is, however, this difference, that flattering lovers often believe part of the flattery they say, and that self-interested flatterers always speak against their feelings. And then to tell the truth, flattery in love is not so dangerous: because when women have reason, they defend themselves from everything lovers tell them, and this is the most important point of the Morality of Ladies, to doubt everything that is said to them in gallantry. But in the end, whether at Court, or in love or in friendship, it is the mark of a great and noble soul to dislike flattery, and to be incapable [52] of flattering. We must certainly regard flattery as a slave who is always base, creeping and dependent on Fortune. There are flatterers of all conditions, and for all sorts of interests. Those who are but parasites do the least harm, because even those who are amused by them despise them: but the most dangerous of all are those who imitate sincere friends: for there are flatterers who themselves speak against flattery, introduce themselves into society as if they were true friends, and very often deceive very skillful people; thus we can say that serious flattery is the most dangerous of all. I have reflected a thousand times in my life on why one is more often deceived [53] in friends than in anything else. I know clever people who have never been deceived in any affair of interest, so clear-sighted and skillful are they, and so careful are they to prevent themselves from being surprised. Indeed, when one takes on servants one inquires very carefully about the places where they have been employed, from the Stewards to the liveried servants: and even these people, so skillful and so wise, and who take so many precautions not to be deceived in some petty interests, boldly take friends on the first flattery that is said to them, and engage their heart before knowing if those to whom they give it are worthy. However, I am convinced that one should take a thousand times more [54] care to know well those whom one wishes to make friends, than those whom one takes for one's servants: for one can but, at the most, confide one's money to those who serve, and one entrusts one's secrets to one's friends. This is why, before giving them that rank, it is necessary to carefully examine whether they deserve it, and to carefully consider whether the complaisance they have is that born of friendship, and led by reason: because it must not be imagined that I want to banish honest complaisance from the world. True friends should not be grumbling, abrupt, or disagreeable; they must praise and praise better than the flatterers, and moreover, to acquire the right to take down their friends on some occasions, they must [55] praise them on others when they are worthy: for the most sincere mark of friendship one can give is to generously warn one's friends of the faults they make or are about to make. You even have to courageously put yourself at risk of displeasing them in some way, rather than exposing them to doing some action for which they would be blamed. When we have also done something that we ourselves recognize is not good, we must take note if our friends tell us so, or at least remain in agreement with us: because if not, we must conclude, either that they are little enlightened, or that they are weak, or that they are flattering. I know very well that the beginnings of flattery are very difficult [56] to recognize: the civility and politeness of the world hide it at first, habit then leads to enduring it, and as soon as one is accustomed to it one is no longer able to recognize it. Honest complaisance, which is the pretext in which flattery seeks to cloak itself, makes friendship sweeter, serves ambition and love, and is, so to speak, the bond of society. Without it the stubborn, the ambitious, the angry, and finally all people of violent and contrary temperaments could not live together. It unites, it softens, it binds society, but that is with a free air, which has nothing low nor servile about it, which smacks neither of haste, nor interest, nor dissimulation: but a low complaisance, or to put it better, flattery disguises itself [57] in all things, it flatters in beauty, in age, in wit; it praises the friends of those it wants to flatter, and blames their enemies, whoever they may be, and finally takes a long circuit to besiege a heart it wants to seize. True friends understate the services they render, and flatterers exaggerate them. Sincere friends could not have more joy than to see that the people they love are loved by everyone: but the flatterers fear, on the contrary, that others will be pleased by them no longer, and it is precisely in their hearts one can find jealousy without affection. However, it is necessary to be careful, by preventing oneself from falling into one fault, from falling into another, and from being uncivil and [58] fractious. The complaisance of honest people is very easy to discern when we take care about it, it never has any particular interest, it generally concerns the propriety of the world; this is precisely what is called knowing how to live; there can be no precise rules for this, judgment and virtue must prescribe the laws. You must not be complaisant either to deceive your Prince if you are at Court, or to deceive your friends. Concealment, lying, or any servile interest must never be involved. It is necessary finally not to make a profession of flattery, which is certainly a more dangerous poison than you think: because in the world there are hardly any flatterers who couldn't [59] be replaced; and if Princes who have a very enlightened mind carefully observe everything that comes to their awareness, they will often see flattery in their courts, in a thousand different figures. It is found in balls, in ballets, in parties, in masquerades; sometimes even at the holiest places, whence it should dare not approach, and it is usually more adorned and more fitted than sincere complaisance, which trusts to its own charms. Finally, flattery has a language all its own, it never praises except by exclamations, and only with the intention of deceiving. I know very well that there are flatterers by temperament, who think of nothing in particular, and who by a general intention of pleasing everyone, have [60] a certain insipid complaisance which displeases: these people are not bad, but ordinarily they have little sense, and feeling that they could not support their opinion if they could have one, they yield to everyone, and take the side of being complaisant by profession. Such people make me pity them, and I am content to avoid them without hating them: but for the flatterers who want to snatch the esteem and the friendship of honest people, and of Kings, and of the Favorites of great Princes, by artifices which should be punished, I hate them in such a way, and I know them so well, that I think I can boast that they will never deceive me. I am convinced that the surest way to guard against [61] flattery is to know oneself well: because, in my opinion, it is easier than to know others. One of the great evils that flattery produces is that it often puts mistrust in the minds of those who despise it, and that is why we sometimes do injustice to the reasonable complaisance of honest people: and to tell you the truth, I would not bear the name of Incredulous that the company gave me today without flattery, and I confess ingenuously that I preferred to doubt everything, than to expose myself to being deceived into believing too lightly all the flattery that people have said to me.

Philiste, having ceased to speak, was praised by the whole company; but Themiste told them that it was [62] against the rules of the Game, and that it was up to him alone to praise or blame, when everyone had spoken. They laughed for a moment at Themiste's seriousness: after which Cleocrite, according to her position, opened her note, and found that it was her place to say a Madrigal; she was extremely happy, and hastened to recite the following, which no one of this amiable troop had yet seen.

MADRIGAL

Without any cause for concern,
I prefer loneliness
To the ball, to the carousel, to the sweetest pleasures,
Everyone says I love you
Beautiful Iris, judge for yourself,
I was born to love, and I see only you.
[63]

This Madrigal, says Plotine, is one of those I like best; it is simple and natural, there is not too much wit: for we see that where there is so much, love does not appear there. All the company agreed to what Plotine said, and the uncertain Artimas opened his note, and found that it was for him to consider whether a confidant in love was always needed. He looked at his note several times, he daydreamed, he began with one word, and said another a moment later, after which he spoke in this manner.

It is to be treated very advantageously by Fortune, to have to support an opinion which has reason and custom on its side. In fact, ever since love has made people happy and miserable, we have never been able to do without confidants, [64] and I do not believe that there is anything more universally established, nor more necessary in a great passion; I don't even think it's possible not to have one. When one begins to love one is still not bound to any secrets, so that it is unbelievable that a man who becomes a lover does not tell his best friend, and when the first step of confidence is made, it is necessary to go until the end: because nothing is more dangerous than to tell a secret by half: however, whenever that would not be so, the means of containing in one's heart all the pains or all the joys that love inspires? if one is ill-treated, one consoles oneself with one's friend; if one is happy, one redoubles one's joy by telling it to another [65] oneself; and then when some little quarrel arises between two people who love each other, it is very convenient to have a secret and faithful arbiter who can end it. It is also the only means of not depending either on followers or attendants; it is a great pleasure to be able to speak of the graces you possess without being accused of vanity. Looking at matters of another sort, it is not that one could not say that in a great passion confidants are sometimes estranged. Some become rivals of their friends; the others are indiscreet, they themselves have mistresses to whom they repeat everything they know; and I once saw an adventure of gallantry go from confidant to confidant, until it was known to [66] everyone; the first confidant tells it to his mistress who has a confidant who tells it to her Lover, this Lover tells it to another confidant, and so on. Finally, I am convinced that it is some sort of indiscretion and infidelity to entrust the favors one receives from a beautiful woman to anyone, at least without her permission. The secret which is the most powerful charm of love is no longer to be found as soon as one has a confidant; sometimes the confidant even gives more grief than consolation; for he is not always tenderly interested in things; hardly does he know what he is being told, one becomes his slave instead of being his friend; we are afraid that he will speak, and little by little we often cease to have any friendship for him. It is not that it is sometimes [67] a great advantage to have a friend who can observe the mistress when the Lover is absent, and talk to her about him when the occasion arises; for after all when the Lady does not herself think of the absent Lover, the confidant does little to remind her of it; it is up to the heart to perform this office, and in a true passion there is no need of a third person. This is good in loves which are not innocent, they are agents and mediators, and not confidants. At this place Artimas paused for a moment, seeming pensive and half-hearted; after which he went on like this. It is not that there cannot be a very honest confidence, which is in fact but a simple trust with the most secret [68] sentiments of a heart, they are not of those kind of people who give letters, who are used for meetings, and who are real agents of love affairs; but after all, if a confidant is of no use except to listen to what is said to him, he is a very useless piece of furniture in gallantry; he must, nonetheless, be good for something, since we see that even those who had no confidants while their love lasted make use of them to tell their past stories, and the most honest people use them thus. It seems to me, however, that it is even more honest to relate what is than to say what has been; for in the height of passion one may be forced to speak by pain or by jealousy, and even by an excess of joy; but those who recount past stories [69] can no longer do so except out of vanity. I think, however, that it is quite difficult to be silent forever, and that you only have to think about choosing the right confidants. But no, I say to myself, they mustn't be chosen, it is necessary that they somehow find themselves involved in the adventure in spite of us, and that chance has its part in it. Yet I still come back to saying that the secret is a great charm in love, and that it is no small pleasure to think that no one in the world knows what happens between those we love and ourselves; that the sentiments which spring from one heart are enclosed in another without anything foreign intermingling with them. It is not that the trust one has in someone does not renew [70] past pleasures by repeating them; there is even this consideration to be made, that in all other things in the world one tells someone what one thinks. This exchange of secrets is the most universal commerce: how then could do we do without it in love where we need more advice and consolation than in anything else? I understand, however, that one can say that love always carries its advice with it, and that a confidant often advises very badly, for he speaks according to his mood, and does not enter into that of his friend. We must however consider that our interest blinds us in everything, and even more so in a passion that blinds all those it possesses, and that thus reason is perhaps [71] not too much opposed to the custom of having confidants in love. I wouldn't want, however, if I made a reform in the Empire of Love, to force all Lovers to have them, and I would like to leave that to the wishes of the lovely ladies.

I would not have believed, said Plotine, laughing, that someone could have gone beyond their duty; however Artimas has gone well beyond his. Don't amuse yourself, said Themiste, in thinking about it, beautiful Plotine, and see what Herminius's note is; he then opened it, and found that it was up to him to maintain, that no confidant in love is needed.

Ah, Themiste, exclaimed Herminius pleasantly, I am the happiest of all the company, since without it costing me [72] a word I shall fully satisfy the rules of the game; for after all, as often in trials of the greatest importance, it is permissible to use the reasons of its sides against themselves, I believe that with all the more reason I can use all that Artimas has said to prove that you need a confidant in Love. For as the greatness of his mind is what makes his will uncertain, he said all that I could have said best, and whoever would separate all the reasons he brought on this subject, would find that he satisfied the two notes that fate gave us. I therefore say all that he said, being unable to think of anything else to say, and though perhaps I could have imagined a part of it myself, I do not leave [73] to consent that Artimas has all the praise that we should have shared. Everyone laughed at what Herminius had said; and it passed by majority vote, that Artimas having exhausted that subject, Herminius was well founded in his claim. They were even persuaded that he had deliberately wanted to make room for the notes which came after his own, and they gave him this praise, unusual for people of great wit, that no one having more facility than he in speaking, no one, however, had an easier time keeping quiet and letting others speak. As for me, said Artimas, who understood raillery well, I confess that I am so uncertain, that I doubt whether what Herminius has said is advantageous to me or not, and must pass for [74] praise or for blame. We'll decide that at the end of the game, said Themiste laughing: However, he added, it's up to Meriandre to see what fate has given him. He then unfolded his note, and found these words there, some verses of an Elegy.

If the game, said Meriandre, had committed me to an entire Elegy, I would have been very puzzled; but for a little piece of Elegy I will perhaps come to the end of it: Then he went to lean for a moment on a window beside the garden, and came to recite the verses which follow.

Importunate reason you freed me;
But despite your advice my fate is not changed,
I thought I was happy, and I am miserable,
[75]
Without love everywhere, sadness overwhelms me,
I seek pleasure, and pleasure escapes me,
Everything that pleased me displeases me and harms me;
I no longer love Iris, but I hate myself;
And to console me for this extreme misfortune,
I want to re-engage, I want to be inflamed;
I'm looking for a young heart that has never loved,
Who lets itself be touched by my tears, by my flame,
Please be forever the master of my soul.
Importunate reason, go and make laws,
To govern States, and to counsel Kings,
Leave me, leave me these sorrows full of charms, [76]
These pleasures that one feels only by shedding tears,
And do not meddle with reigning in a heart,
That no longer wants to have anything but love as a conqueror.

Despite the rules of the game, said Noromate after Meriandre had recited these Verses, I cannot help saying that there is some novelty in making Verses which have a rather tender character, even if he who made them has love no longer. What you say is well observed, said Themiste; but you prevent me from saying it when I shall be obliged to judge. However, he added, looking at me, see what chance gives you. So then I looked at my note, and I saw that it was up to me to invent a beautiful [77] country house: as I am very fond of architecture, gardens and fountains, I was not sorry; Here's very nearly what I said.

I see well that according to the rules of the game I am condemned to describe a beautiful country house according to my fancy; but as it seems to me that the imagination is more pleasantly filled with what is than with what could be, I will speak to the whole company as if I had actually seen somewhere all that I will describe. I even think I saw a book on the table of one of my friends, which is called the Dream of Polyphile, whose Author, if my memory does not deceive me, does not stop speaking as if he had actually seen all that he [78] describes, although he only intended to give an idea of some beautiful Architecture: at least I observed that in the two or three pages that I read of it, for I am not witty enough to read books of this sort from cover to cover. I will therefore say that about two leagues from the foremost City in the world, after having passed a very pleasant wood, one finds a rather rustic bridge which crosses a very beautiful and very famous river, beyond which one climbs by a path that does not promise what one should find; one even arrives at the gate of the Palace without discovering anything, for it still very modestly hides all the beauties it encloses; the front of the building that one sees on entering does not initially have that surprising appearance which [79] makes one be surprised at what one sees, it is only regular according to its disposition; the courtyard which is on the terrace is of a reasonable size; there is a niche opposite the vestibule which can be used to keep birds; it has a rustic countenance in the middle, and carvings low on both sides; but on entering one sees to the left of the courtyard a balustrade, beyond which one suddenly discovers an expanse of view so marvelous that, except the sea, all the beautiful objects of the world are exhibited to the eyes of those who lean on it to dream pleasantly. However, as this view is even more beautiful from another place which I will tell you about, I do not want to stop there, and I want to lead you into the Palace through a vestibule [80] adorned at the outside with some low carvings: This place has something singular, because we can say that this vestibule is double, it penetrates the whole body of the building, half of it serves as a passage to reach the staircase on the left which is very beautiful and well-lit, and the other half is properly a stepped vestibule used to descend to the garden by steps on both sides, at several pauses. But what is most special is that after having seen in the courtyard this beautiful and large view beyond the balustrade, one sees from the first step one takes when entering the vestibule a view bounded by tall trees which produce an admirable effect. For this stepped vestibule is open on all sides of the garden; [81] the bottom has an iron balustrade, and the openings at the top have a figure on either side. From this place there, looking down, one finds a large flowerbed lined with large trees which seem to go up to Heaven, which one does not see from this place; and we also discover a round feature with a fountain in the middle; then we go up the beautiful staircase of which I have spoken, and we enter a large and magnificent salon which makes us forget everything we have seen and in this place and elsewhere, so surprising is it, and pleasantly fills the eyes; and one can say that all that art and nature can make beautiful, can be seen in this superb salon. It is large and spacious, its elevation is proportionate to its size, and the shape is very beautiful: at the end, on the [82] side of the large and beautiful view, there are three large arched windows open from top to bottom, and four on the right hand which have different views; mirrors have even been placed opposite, which double the view of the countryside, and which make this admirable salon appear to be entirely open on three sides. All the dome is painted and gilded, and has a great air of magnificence. The paintings are very beautiful and of a very noble color. The Painter has represented the alliance of two Royal Houses. The two Nations are represented by two figures of women that Cupid crowns, and towards the top of the picture appear the portraits of a great Prince and a beautiful Princess, supported by the Horae. We also see [83] the goddess Fama, and several little Cupids who chase away disorder and discord; but one would almost take them for children of Fama, for they all have little trumpets in their hands, and in banners the weapons of the two Nations, of which the alliance is made. We again see at the top of the fireplace the portrait of a young Prince who holds a laurel wreath, and of a young Princess, who will one day be the greatest ornament in the world: and we also see surrounded by this magnificent salon in gilt frames, of different sizes, but arranged in order between the casements the portraits of several great Princes and Princesses of the principal Courts of Europe; so that everywhere one [84] discovers only beautiful objects. But after having looked at all these portraits, the description of which would be too long, and where the gold of the friezes and cornices mingle and shine pleasantly between the paintings, we go to the end of the salon, whose large windows are open, and we enter a balustraded corridor that runs all around the building, from where we discover the most beautiful view that can fall under our eyes. It is in this place that art must yield to nature, and that one is so surprised and so charmed that words fail to express what one sees. This view is neither too broad nor too limited; it has objects at all sorts of distances, the eyes are occupied and entertained without losing themselves, the diversity [85] means that this view is always new even for those who enjoy it most often, and we always notice in it something we hadn't seen before. We see under our feet a large terraced parterre divided in two, a pleasant canal lined with grass and covered with Swans, with a low lane which predominates all around, and orange trees which form it. This terraced parterre is lined with pleasant outdoor vases filled with flowering myrtles: the canal has two water fountains which make it even more pleasant; to the left, over a clump of trees which seem to dare not rise in this place for fear of concealing the view, appears the rustic bridge of which I have already spoken, and further on a village which adorns the [86] landscape, principally because it has behind it a large and pleasant wood, which through this opposition makes a more amiable object, and above this wood in the distance appears a mountain crowned with buildings. We also see quite far to the left a Castle whose rather ancient architecture does not fail to embellish this place; and one even sees in a clump of trees which is beyond the canal a small dome pulling to the right which seems to be hidden there, and which nevertheless adds something pleasant to this place; and above the trees one sees meadows and willows which let the river appear through their small leaves, one would say that it meanders in this place to be more beautiful, as if it were [87] afraid of being taken for a canal, and after making a detour to the right, it hides and flees between the mountains. We discover even from this place over a thousand surprising objects, which gradually fade away as we move away, of the foremost city in the world, which by its own size does not fail to be observed despite the distance, and we easily discern on a fine day the beautiful and long galleries of the Palace of a great King. Finally we see mountains beyond this superb city, which seem to unite with the sky, and give a limit without limits to this admirable landscape. But to consider the view one sees on the right beyond the trees, certain rustic and wild hillocks which make the other objects [88] seem more beautiful; the river which makes a detour on the same side greatly embellishes the whole place, and a thousand confused and different things which mingle among those which can be discerned render this sight grand, noble, and charming. The four windows that are along the living room have a different view that has something more appropriate for melancholy, but that does not fail to please. From there you can see a parterre, a fountain in the middle, and beyond it a thick, leafy wood that seems to promise a forest behind it. The same river of which I spoke still shows itself by a small return, which one sees only from there, in a further entertaining variation. But finally we force ourselves to leave this superb [89] salon to enter a magnificent room, where we see on the fireplace the portrait of a King whose epithet of Great distinguished him from all the other Kings, who preceded him; and one sees in the same room six portraits of his Royal family, the foremost in the world, which are perfectly true to life. For the dome there are represented the four Seasons, and the four Elements together; that is to say that on each side there is an Element and a Season. We pass again into another room which leads to the baths, which are very beautiful and very agreeable. We see represented on the ceilings the goddess Flora, and on the chimney the portrait of a beautiful Princess who surpasses the Goddess of which I speak; and around in [90] ovals the portraits of the preeminent people of the earth. This cabinet also has mirrors to double the view; and in a recess which at first seems an alcove, is the place of the baths where one sees small niches with figures which hold vases from which water seems to come out: Finally this apartment is very beautiful and very magnificent, there is also a place downstairs for the Theater. But it is time to take you for a walk, and to descend into the garden by that vestibule staircase of which I have already spoken. When we're there, and we turn around to see the building, the face is more beautiful than anywhere else, and this middle staircase and the balustraded corridor that prevails all around make an object [91] which pleases: but finally beyond the parterre we lose the beautiful view, and we finds a small solitary canal very different from the first. There is a fountain of water in the middle, and a very thick wood beyond which easily leads to daydreaming: this water seems dark like the melancholy it inspires: you then descend by a rather rustic staircase, having at the left this little canal I mentioned, and on the right a little low lane quite narrow, cool and pleasant, with a stream running all the way down the middle, and a wild and solitary little grotto at the end extremely appropriate to whiling away the great heat of the longest days of Summer. Next to it runs a high and equally dark lane; and advancing a little further, [92] we see a smaller one which has a pleasant fountain at the end, and which is very fit for daydreaming, without wishing to be interrupted. Then we come to a rural crossroads, where we find three small walks that go down, between tall trees, to three fountains with rustic basins; and beyond these same paths continue rising, which makes a bounded view of the whole, which would not fail to please a Lover who has some joy or some pain to hide. Then we go by a very pleasant path to see a grotto, in front of which is a big burbling of water, the murmur of which begins to mark the abundance that there is in this place. We see on the right a [93] walk with a fountain, and on the left this same walk which continues; and, beyond a fountain, a perspective which allows a glimpse of a little Nymph who seems to have her heart occupied only with a little dog whom she loves, and who is represented in the same place. We then enter this grotto where we find everything that can amuse the eyes, and everything that art, which has made itself the tyrant of the freest waters, has invented that is prettiest. But as I have to speak next of greater beauties, I will not stop there; for there is as much difference between pleasant grottoes and magnificent waterfalls, as one sees between these pretty trifles and small silver services which entertain children [94] of elites, and these large and magnificent basins, with their vases and their litters that everyone went to admire at the Royal Factory of Furniture to the Crown under the direction of Charles Le Brun. Coming out of the grotto, you have to pass quite close to the top of an admirable waterfall, which you can't help looking at: But as this gathering of beautiful things should not be seen from there, I will tell you that in going from one beautiful place to another, one finds different paths everywhere; sometimes we discover balustrades, sometimes palisades; and that finally descending between tall trees which seem to touch the clouds, one arrives at a large square of water which is one of the most beautiful things one can see. It is of a size that has magnificence, it is dressed up with a balustrade [95] on the side of the wood that goes up; and on the side of this balustrade, precisely in the middle and under the most beautiful trees in the world, appears a large rock from water which, by various large regular and tumultuous bubbles, makes an admirable object; two fountains, the jets of which form an arcade, accompany this movable crystal rock, if it is permissible to speak thus, and several sculpted animal faces below the balustrade jet water forming big bubbles in this large square which I have just described. But all this is nothing compared to a great big fountain of water which is in the middle, for it shoots out with such great impetuosity that the rapidity of rockets can at best only equal it in speed, without surpassing it in height: [96] Indeed it soars with a noise which marks its strength, and passing above the highest trees seems to have to stop only in Heaven, and the eyes would doubtless be deceived, if we observed it only growing and scattering into the air, it falls again like a stormy rain which disturbs all the tranquility of the square of water, and whose murmuring noise pleasantly chases away the silence of such a beautiful place. We take no note during this that opposite this square of water there is a very pleasant rustic view, nor that there are wild places all around which redouble its beauty, and we could hardly notice that to the right and to the left we see a large and beautiful walkway which has architectural niches [97] at one end. But finally we are forced to leave this beautiful place to go along this path which leads to the waterfall. When one has arrived there, one is charmed by the beauty of this magnificent and surprising object, and one can say that if the rivers have their natural bed, Art has taken pleasure in making a very superb one for these regular torrents that rush one after another on this beautiful mountain of architecture, if I may be permitted to speak thus: for unlike rivers which have their beds in valleys, waterfalls must have theirs in high places. We therefore see at the top of that of which I speak a gilded balustrade, in the middle of which appear the most illustrious arms of the world carried [98] by two rivers and supported by a Dolphin with a gilded head; and to the right and to the left of the rivers we see two figures on each side which adorn this place, and which are still accompanied by a few others: the rivers have vases near them from which emerges a prodigious quantity of water: The Dolphin also spouts an extreme abundance of it, and to the right and to the left of these large sheets of water are two long rows of candlesticks of frothy waters, fountains mixed with grassy lawns, and a pleasant stream; and lower down two other rows of smaller fountains and bubbling waters, again mixed with greenery. But between all these candlesticks, these bubbles and these spouts of different size appear again golden sculpted animal muzzles [99] which gush water; and towards the top, besides these elevated ranks of so many bubbles of water, one sees two other Dolphins supporting figures which also jet water abundantly, and among all this a great number of gilded balls representing bombs, and serving as body to a very beautiful and very ingenious motto [Alter post fulmina terror—The other terror after the lightning] which was made by a man of great merit for a very great Prince. But all that can be said cannot represent these great sheets of water, these jets, these bubbles, these gullies, these streams, these torrents which rush at will one from the other, and which contribute all according to their power to embed this beautiful mountain of architecture in liquid crystal. In one [100] place the waters gush, in another they flow and spread: in one place they rush, in another they only slip; and this element, which has almost no natural color, takes several from space to space for the pleasure of the eyes. For the big froths of water whiten like snow, the channels take on the color of grass, the water that pours over the candlesticks and the muzzles, makes golden waves like those of the Pactolus, and all these waters together, everywhere the same and everywhere different, spread with so much force, and so much abundance, that had they the sea for reserve they could not appear with more prodigality. But finally they discharge into a large [101] basin which has several fountains of water and several gilded sculptural muzzles which also discharge into some shells in two rows; and it is precisely on the right and on the left that we see this beautiful motto of which I have already spoken. To accompany this magnificent waterfall, beyond this basin which I have just described which has on both sides the figures of the four winds, and a few others, are two Dragons which also jet water, and a beautiful grassy path in the middle, and on each side it has fountains of water in the shape of a crystal balustrade which fall back into small pools linked by a pleasant brook which murmurs and which flows between grassy areas: and further on still is a round fountain, with a beautiful jet in the middle, beyond which [102] is a path leading to a balustrade which overlooks the edge of the river. The landscape, to the right and to the left, is very beautiful; but we can't see that the waterfall keeps going, so all we can do then is not cease to look at its magnificent bed, or better said its superb throne which gives it reign over all the beautiful places in the surroundings. But finally to complete the description that I am obliged to make, when one is tired of admiring such a beautiful thing, one turns to the right, and one sees a rustic little hill pleasantly limiting the view to give it a rest from the grand objects that have occupied it. We also see large trees whose shade is extremely pleasing: We then see a [103] grilled door, a walk that goes to a balustrade, and from this place the large fountain which is in the middle of the square of water is wonderful. You can again see a beautiful orchard as you pass: you turn right into a path from which you discover several others, and large compartments of grass on the left, interspersed with small canals and small squares of water, with arched water jets which make a marvelous object: for all this is lined with greenery, and the paths which form the compartments are sanded; but this simplicity, which has a rural air, nevertheless has something grand and noble about it which is infinitely pleasing. We finally arrive at a place where there is a round fountain with thirteen jets of water of equal height arranged in order; [104] it is in the middle of eight paths from which we also equally see this pleasant object, and all the views of these eight paths are different. From one we see a hill of grape vines, and no habitation; and on the other a part of the building and a high lane that crowns these mountains: on the left a small wood in the shape of a labyrinth; and advancing one sees another garden where we end. It is closed on one side by a cradle of honeysuckle and jasmine: the other three faces are palisades of honeysuckle, with porticoes below also adorned with honeysuckle on the top. This garden is again made of large carpets of grass, with a roundel in the middle, having on the right along the mountain a higher path, [105] and still above a terraced canal more than a hundred yards long lined with grass. There would be yet a hundred other beautiful things to describe, if I were not afraid that my description would be found too long; this is why I will content myself with asking him who is to be my judge to pass over in his imagination the beauty of the salon, of the beautiful view, of the different gardens, of the woods, of the fountains, of the canals, of the lanes, of the square of water, of this marvelous fountain which nearly attacks the Sun, and of this admirable waterfall where Art does such gentle violence to Nature, where the fountains become torrents, where the torrents change into peaceful roundels, and where we finally see what we cannot [106] even see in superb Italy, nor in any other place in the world, since it is true that since men discovered the art of tyrannizing the waters and subjugating them to follow their will, they have never been used either with so much magnificence or with so much beauty.

All the company then starting to want to praise the description of this beautiful house, I interrupted them. You may think, I added, that I am at the end of my speech; but I must nevertheless tell you a notion that I have: It is that I cannot stand when a fine house does not have an owner worthy of it, and I remember have been in very beautiful places that were unbearable [107] to me; because those to whom they belonged were not honest enough people to deserve them and to fulfill them. It is not the same with the Enchanted Palace of which I have just spoken to you, I claim that it belongs to a great and amiable Prince, and to a beautiful and charming Princess, in whom one finds everything that attracts respect, admiration, zeal, and tenderness. These four feelings are born in hearts as soon as we see them. These two people are made for the delights of the eyes and for the bliss of the spirit. Their royal birth is the least of their great qualities: we nevertheless count it greatly, because by their obliging and gentle manner, full of humanity [108] towards those who approach them, we see that they do not reckon it themselves to dispense with being kind among their inferiors, and that they are quite willing to have their merit preferred to their status. The Prince who had this wonderful waterfall made is, as I have already said, of a birth that sees nothing above it: He is handsome, well made, and with a good grace: he has the hair of the most beautiful black in the world; lively, brilliant eyes, full of spirit, courage, kindness, and tenderness; a mouth very beautiful, a pleasant and charming smile, a well-shaped nose, a face with a shape that gives pleasure, and a certain air of grandeur mixed with charms and humanity which delights, and which gives him a happy and witty countenance [109] capable of pleasing infinitely. He has a very well shaped figure, handsome legs, a very free air; and finally I conceive that a great painter, by imitating the face of this Prince, could represent a God handsome enough to even make Goddesses jealous. He has, moreover, that art of dressing gallantly, which is known to so few people, and yet which adds much to beauty and good looks: And I remember one day among others that he had a jacket of gold brocade, with a brown background, embroidered with pearls, the buttons of which were large diamonds, and which everyone praised and admired for its magnificence. But what makes him worthy of all imaginable praise is that he has a mind and [110] heart commensurate with his birth and the charms of his person. He is always grand and always civil, and in a hundred ways that cannot be expressed, he binds the hearts of those who approach him: He speaks very justly and very pleasantly, and that charming familiarity which goes so well with the respect due to the person of a great Prince, is found eminently in him. He loves everything he should love: He wants to have friends, and love them unchangingly. He is secretive when he must be: with pleasure, he protects his people, does them justice even against his own interests; likes to do good to everyone, and finally testifies by a hundred different things, that he is capable of everything [111] that can make a great and excellent Prince, either in peace or in war. For the beautiful Princess who shares his fortune with him, I dare not think of depicting her, knowing that a painting has been made of her which resembles her much better than the one I would put here could resemble her. I will therefore content myself only with saying a Madrigal which is intended to go under one of his portraits. Here it is:

This air so delicate, this enchanted gaze,
This complexion that outshines both lilies and roses,
This surprising gathering of so many beautiful things,
Represents to your eyes the perfect beauty:
[112]
But this brilliant spirit so filled with justness,
To our charmed spirits a Goddess in fact;
As soon as we see her, we must admire her,
As soon as she speaks, we must adore her.

I will only add to this that this divine Princess is a thousand times above all that can be said of her, and that whatever praises one has heard given to her before having seen her, one is still surprised at her brilliance and merit. It is easy to judge that a Prince and a Princess such as I have just represented them, have a numerous, gallant, and agreeable Court: they both love persons of merit, and obligingly distinguish them; [113] they have everything that attracts hearts and everything that keeps them. Without bewilderment, we see the crowd around them: Everyone seems happy when we approach them: joy spreads among all those who pay their court to them; and when they have a party in the beautiful Palace that I have described to you, nothing is more knowing, more gallant, more proper, or more magnificent. The games, the pleasures, the loves are in all the walkways and at the edge of all the fountains: The Prince is accompanied by all that is great: the Princess has daughters whose beauty can subjugate all; and from so many accomplished people, a charming and agreeable Court is formed, where everything pleases, and where nothing [114] disturbs. One would believe in that place that those who in all centuries and among all nations have so decried the Courts of Princes, as being filled with deceivers, ingrates, social climbers, backbiters, and slanderers: one would believe, I say, that they did not know what they were saying: for in this one it seems that esteem, admiration, and joy cause one to think only of pleasing, and of being suffered pleasantly; and the pleasure of loving Master and Mistress could even suspend hatred, envy, and all other evil passions. Finally, if it is permitted to speak in this manner, one follows them without being able to prevent it, and one feels attracted by a gentle violence such as we say was [115] that of this charming harmony, which made itself followed by the woods and the rocks. It's up to you, I said then to the beautiful Melancholic, to do what your note and the law of the game imposes on you: for I dare not speak any longer, although I still have a thousand things to say of the illustrious persons who make not only the greatest ornament of the Palace which I have described, but one of the greatest ornaments in the world. I would never have believed, Themiste told me, that you could have made a description like that. As for me, added Plotine, speaking to me, I expected that in order to acquit yourself promptly you would build us a little house, and yet [116] instead of that you make us a Palace, a Hero, and a Heroine. Ah! I cried, interrupting her, I must be a bad painter: for I can clearly see that you are going to force me to do as we did when Painting during childhood, where we put the name of what we represented, because we had represented it badly. I knew very well, I continued, that I would unjustly leave out a great deal from everything I described, and that the Originals were more beautiful than the copies: but I would never, however, have felt compelled to tell you that I described Saint Cloud, that my Hero is Monsieur, and my Heroine is Madame. No sooner had I said this than the whole company begged my pardon [117] for the stupidity; and whatever the custom of flattering those who described something, everyone still agreed that I was right, and that my description was far beneath the truth. For me, said Herminius, I don't understand how we could have listened to all this like a Romance [or Novel]; it was no doubt pleasure that suspended my reason: for this beautiful motto of the bomb, which one of my friends, whose name and merit are so well known, gave to Monsieur, has been in my memory since he gave it and it was found so judicious, so beautiful, and so suitable for the illustrious brother of a great King. How, says Philiste, to have only heard of the waterfall and to not recognize it? and how again to have glimpsed the Prince and the Princess just once without recognizing them? [118] We had certainly all lost our minds. As for me, said Artimas, I thought of it more than once, but doubting my thought I did not say it. Afterwards Noromate was asked to see what her note was, and it was decided that it was up to her to tell a story: but far from appearing embarrassed, she testified that she was very pleased. There seems so much joy in your eyes, said Plotine to her, that you must certainly have a ready-made story in your head: for as for me, I would be in despair if chance had imposed on me the necessity of telling one. I am even happier [119] than you think, replied Noromate with a charming smile: for this story is not only in my head, it is in a text which a friend of mine gave me this morning: and as it is not published, and the person who made it intends to give it to the illustrious Masters of the Palace that one has described to us, I believe I am satisfying the rules of the game by offering to read it to the company. Everyone agreed with what she was saying: but as we were there, and we were preparing to hear what the beautiful Noromate had to read, we heard drums: we sent to know what it was, and it was known that it was Monsieur, and Madame who were going to Saint Cloud [120] where they were giving one of those pleasant parties of which I had just spoken. Someone told us that all the walkways would be lit with crystal chandeliers, that there would be fireworks, and that by a mixture of rockets and fountains of water these two Elements would dispute together who could best entertain such a charming Court: so that, postponing the rest of the game to the next day, we resolved to go and see this beautiful party, and to return to sleep in that place, where the mistress of the house had the means to receive all the company very conveniently in very clean apartments. A moment later we learned that the Prince and Princess had ordered that all persons of [121] quality be allowed into the gardens. So we had a brunch, and we went to admire more closely all that I had described: and I had, if I dare say it, the confusion and the joy to see that all that I had praised was much above my praises. But as the greatest charm of all pleasures is the freedom to change them when the fancy takes hold, we did not finish our game the next day. We spent the day, however, reading the story which the beautiful Melancholic had brought, which seemed to us very entertaining; but no one wanted the Master of the game to declare a winner, as it had been decided at the beginning. So without anyone having won, we returned to [122] Paris, talking to each other with more pleasure of the charming qualities of Monsieur and Madame than of the adventures of Mathilde.

THE END

Original Text

[1]

LES IEUX

SERVANT DE PREFACE

A MATHILDE

Novs partiſmes de Paris à deux carroſſes le plus beau jour de l'Automne, pour l'aller paſſer à une de ces agreables maiſons qui ſont au bord de la Seine du coſté qu'elle deſcend. Nous eſtions cinq femmes, & il y avoit quatre hommes avec nous, dont l'eſprit eſtoit aſſurément tres-propre à rendre vne compagnie fort agreable. Nous eſtabliſmes pour [2] regle de noſtre ſocieté pendant ce jour-là de ne ſonger qu'à ce qui pourroit nous divertir, de bannir toutes les penſées d'affaires : nous voulûmes encore, que s'il y avoit quelqu'vn des hommes qui eſtoient avec nous, qui eût de l'amour, qu'il fiſt tréve avec ſa paſſion, afin de n'avoir que des plaiſirs tranquilles : on reſolut auſſi de ne joüer point pour éviter le chagrin d'avoir perdu, & nous voulûmes ſi bien renoncer à nous-meſmes, que nous changeâmes de nom en badinant : nous ne prîmes pourtant pas d'abord de ces noms de Roman dont il eſt ſi aiſé de trouver ; & vn homme de la compagnie nous ayant dit qu'en Italie dans les celebres Academies, les particuliers qui les compoſoient prenoient des noms qui marquoient quelque [3] choſe de leur humeur, ou qui avoient quelque autre rapport à eux, nous cherchâmes ou à nous loüer ou à nous blâmer en nous deſignant. Vne de mes amies fut nommée l'Indifferent, parce qu'en effet elle aime peu de choſe : vne autre la Melancolique, quoy que ſa melancolie ſoit charmante : la troiſiéme l'Enjoüée : la quatriéme fut appellée l'Incredule, parce qu'on n'a jamais pû luy perſuader qu'on ait eu ni amour ni amitié pour elle. On appella vn des hommes l'Opiniaſtre : Vn autre le Complaiſant, qui merite en effet ce nom-là. Le troiſiéme ſe nomma luy-meſme l'Incertain, n'ayant jamais pû convenir de ce qui le pourroit rendre heureux. Et le dernier fut appellé l'Ambitieux, parce [4] que ceux qui le connoiſſent bien croyent qu'il ſacrifieroit toûjours toutes choſes à ſa fortune. D'abord cette maniere de blâmer & de loüer en nommant la compagnie nous divertit & ſervit de fondement pour nous faire vne de ces guerres innocentes qui ſe ſont toûjours avec joye, & qui finiſſent d'eſtime & d'amitié quand c'eſt entre des perſonnes raiſonnables. Mais ayant remarqué que nous avions quelque peine à trouver des noms ſi nouveaux, nous en priſmes dans Cyrus & dans Clelie qui avoient quelque rapport à ces divers temperamens. La belle Enjoüée ſe nomma Plotine, l'Opiniaſtre Herminius, l'Ambitieux prit le nom de Themiſte, on donna celuy d'Artimas à l'Incertain, [5] la belle Indifferente ſe nomma Cleocrite, la Melancolique Noromate, le Complaiſant Meriandre : mais pour la belle Incredule, on ne trouva point de nom qui luy convinſt, & on l'appella Philiſte. L'aimable Plotine dit que ce qui faiſoit qu'on ne trouvoit point de belle Incredule dans tous les Romans, c'eſt qu'il n'eſtoit pas vray-ſemblable qu'vne belle perſonne ne cruſt pas aſſez facilement d'eſtre aimée. Cependant, ajouſta cette aimable femme, je voy bien que le nom qu'on me donne me fait entendre tout doucement que je ſuis trop gaye ; mais outre que je ſuis perſuadée qu'il faut toûjours ſuivre ſon humeur naturelle, c'eſt que je me trouve tres-heureuſe d'eſtre par temperament ce que tout le mon- [6] de devroit eſtre par raiſon. Ie comprens auſſi bien que vous, dit la belle Noromate, que le nom que je porte aujourd'huy, me reproche que je ſuis d'ordinaire vn peu trop ſerieuſe ; mais comme ma melancolie ne va pas juſqu'au chagrin & que je n'en ay qu'autant qu'il en faut avoir pour ne rire pas de tout, & pour eſtre capable de ſecret & d'amitié, je me conſole de la langueur dont on me fait la guerre. Pour moy, dit Meriandre, je m'aperçoy bien qu'en me nommant on a feint de me loüer, quoy qu'on ait eu deſſein de me blâmer d'vne complaiſance exceſſive ; mais pour me juſtifier & pour me venger, je ſouhaite de tout mon cœur que tous ceux qui me blâment trouvent vn contrediſant tous les jours de leur vie, afin de leur faire con- [7] noiſtre qu'il vaut encore mieux eſtre vn peu trop complaiſant que de ne l'eſtre point du tout. Pour ce qui me regarde, dit Herminius, je renonce à la complaiſance & par temperament & par raiſon : il faut ceder aux Loix & aux Souverains ſans raiſonner ; mais en toutes les autres choſes, il faut ſoûtenir ſon opinion avec courage, & ne ceder qu'à la verité quand on la connoiſt. Mais, ajoûta-t-il, la belle Cleocrite ne ſera pas de mon avis : l'en demeure d'accord, dit-elle, & je trouve qu'il eſt bien plus commode de s'empeſcher de diſputer, de laiſſer croire aux autres ce qu'ils veulent & de croire ce qu'on veut, que d'entreprendre de conteſter contre tout le monde quand meſme on a raiſon. Principalement, dit l'Incertain Artimas, [8] puiſqu'il y a tant d'incertitude & dans les choſes qu'on dit, & dans les choſes qu'on penſe. Pour moy, dit la charmante Philiſte, on me blâme le plus injuſtement du monde, car je n'ay de l'incredulité qu'en amour & en amitié. Ie croy auſſi facilement qu'on veut, toutes les nouvelles qu'on me dit ; mais j'avouë de bonne foy que je croy tres-difficilement qu'on m'aime, & je ne penſe pas avoir tort : car il y a peu de gens au monde qui ſçachent aimer, & je croy meſme pouvoir aſſurer hardiment que perſonne n'a jamais ſceû bien preciſément juſqu'à quel point il a eſté aimé ; il y a toûjours du plus ou du moins. Celles qui s'aiment fort, croyent facilement qu'on les imite & qu'on les aime autant qu'elles s'aiment elles-meſmes. Mais [9] quand on ne veut pas ſe laiſſer tromper, on ne ſe fie pas tant à ſon propre merite & l'on ſe deffie davantage des autres. On ne croit point du tout qu'on trouve de l'amour & de l'amitié ſincere & tendre dans le cœur de tous ceux qui en parlent ; au contraire on panche à croire qu'il n'en eſt point, ou qu'il n'en eſt gueres ; & quand il ſeroit vray que je ferois quelquefois injuſtice à quelqu'vn, j'aimerois mieux en cette rencontre la faire que de la ſouffrir, quoy qu'en toutes les autre choſes il vaille mieux la ſouffrir que la faire. Mais ce qui fait la pluſpart du temps qu'on croit facilement d'eſtre aſſez aimé, c'eſt qu'on ne veut gueres aimer, & il n'y a aſſurément que les perſonnes qui ſeroient capables d'vne grande ami- [10] tié, qui puiſſent bien remarquer les defauts des affections vulgaires. C'eſt pourquoy pour ne m'y tromper pas, je ne me perſuade point aiſément qu'on m'aime, je n'en ſuis pas moins civile ni moins ſociable, je n'accuſe perſonne en particulier, je regarde les affections tiedes, infidelles, ou frivoles, comme des defauts du monde en general, & je ne laiſſe pas de croire qu'il y a de l'eſtime, & d'vne certaine amitié d'habitude & de bien-ſeance qui rend la ſocieté agreable. Mais pour des amitiez tout-à-fait ſinceres, tendres, & vniques, je n'en croy point, ou je n'en croy gueres ; & c'eſt pour cela qu je loüe l'ambitieux de s'eſtre abandonné à l'ambition où la ſincere amitié n'eſt pas neceſſaire. Quoy, reprit [11] bruſquement l'ambitieux Themiſte, vous croyez que l'ambition ſoit incompatible avec l'amitié ; elle qui fait les Heros, & ſans laquelle la Vertu ſeroit languiſſante ? C'eſt vne paſſion qui reſſemble ſi fort à la gloire, que tres-ſouvent on les prend l'vne pour l'autre ; L'ambition raiſonnable ne met pas dans le cœur le deſir d'eſtre riche, elle y met celuy d'eſtre grand, de ſurpaſſer les autres en toutes choſes, de ſe ſignaler, de plaire à ſon Prince, & de chercher la Fortune par toutes les voyes honneſtes, ſoit dans les armes, ſoit dans les lettres. Il faut meſme qu'vn ambitieux comme je l'entends, ait des amis & qu'il les ſerve : car quand on ne ſert perſonne, il arrive auſſi que perſonne ne vous ſert. Il me ſemble, dis-je en riant [12] à toute la compagnie, que c'est vne aſſez plaiſante choſe de penſer que nous ſommes tous ſortis de Paris pour venir faire chacun noſtre eloge. Tout le monde rit de la remarque que j'avois faite, & l'on ceſſa de ſe loüer ou de s'excuſer. Le lieu où nous eſtions eſtoit agreable, on ſe promena avant que de diſner : le repas fut excellente & propre : il y eut vn concert de violes & de claveſſins tout à fait charmant : en ſuite Noromate chanta deux airs paſſionnez preſque auſſi bien qu'on peut chanter : Plotine & Philiſte danſerent les petites danſes avec deux des hommes de la compagnie : on parla de cent choſes agreables, où chacun ſouſtint ſon opinion, ſelon ſon nom & ſon humeur. Mais enfin aprés que la converſation eut duré [13] quelque temps, les vns propoſerent de paſſer dans vne grande ſalle dont la veuë eſtoit plus belle, vn autre dit qu'il valoit mieux aller ſe promener en carroſſe, cét avis fut contredit, & vne Dame ſoûtint que quand on alloit à vne maiſon de campagne pour vn jour ſeulement, il valoit mieux ſe promener à pied. Cela eſt bon, dit Plotine en ſoûriant, quand on a deſſein de ſe ſeparer de la compagnie pour faire vne converſation particuliere avec quelqu'vn qui plaiſt plus que tout le reſte ; mais hors de là il vaut autant ſe promener en carroſſe. Ie vous aſſure, ajoûta Philiſte, que la pluſpart du temps ces gens qu'on voit qui ſe ſeparent des autres ne ſçavent que ſe dire quand ils ſont éloignez. Pour moy, dit Merian- [14] dre, quand je ſuis en vne compagnie comme celle-cy je tiens toûjours que tous les plaiſirs ſont bien choiſis, & je me range facilement à celuy qu'on me propoſe. En mon particulier, luy dit Cleocrite, je fais par indifference ce que vous faites par vne complaiſance obligeante pour vos amis. Et pour ce qui me regarde, dit Artimas, j'ay pluſtoſt fait de ne vouloir rien que d'examiner ſi je veux vne choſe pluſtoſt qu'vne autre ; car à peine me ſuis-je perſuadé que j'ay choiſi, que je blâme mon choix, & ne veux plus ce que j'ay voulu. Mais peut-eſtre donc, reprit Plotine, ne voulez-vous plus désja eſtre icy. Tout le monde rit de ce que diſoit cette aimable femme. Ah Madame ! reprit agreablement Artimas, c'eſt mon eſprit qui [15] eſt irreſolu, mais pour mon cœur il ne l'eſt point du tout ; & comme il y a icy des perſonnes que j'aime fort tendrement, je ſuis ravi d'y eſtre, & je ne connois point d'irreſolution ſur cela. Ie ſuis perſuadé, dit Herminius, qu'il faut neceſſairement ſe determiner ſur toutes ſortes de choſes, & ſe faire vn choix, meſme des plaiſirs. Ah pour les plaiſirs, m'écriay-je, vous eſtes en la plus grande erreur du monde ſi vous croyez qu'il faille choiſir des plaiſirs qu'on ne puiſſe changer : car depuis qu'on commence à parler juſqu'à ce qu'on ceſſe de vivre, les plaiſirs changent, & doivent changer. On le jouë dans l'enfance, on aime les divertiſſemens, & on les cherche avec empreſſement dans la belle jeuneſſe : on les ſouffre [16] ſans les chercher dans l'âge qui ſuit celuy-là, & puis enfin on s'en fait d'autres dans la ſuite de la vie. Ie croy meſme, ajouſtay-je, qu'en vn meſme temps & en vn meſme jour on peut ſe divertir & s'ennuyer d'vne meſme choſe ; les longs plaiſirs ceſſent de l'eſtre, il ne faut ni de trop longues Comedies, ni de trop longues muſiques, le bal quand on a trop danſé ceſſe de divertir, les longues railleries ſont ennuyeuſes, & c'eſt proprement dans les plaiſirs qu'il faut de la varieté & des intervalles, & que le cœur & l'esprit ont beſoin de ſe délaſſer. A parler en general, on void que les hommes peuvent eſtre capables de ſe contenter d'vne ſeule occupation : vn homme de guerre ſe contente de ſa profeſſion, vn magiſtrat de la ſienne, [17] vn homme de lettres de meſme, vn grand Peintre peint toute ſa vie ſans s'ennuyer, vn Sculpteur fait toûjours des ſtatuës & ne ſe chagrine que quand il n'a pas occaſion d'en faire, & ainſi de toutes les autres occupations de la vie, grandes & petites, ſelon les differentes conditions : mais nul homme n'a jamais eu vn plaiſir vnique. C'eſt pour cela qu'on parle ordinairement en noſtre langue des plaiſirs, & non pas du plaiſir, quand on veut parler des amuſemens & des divertiſſemens dont nous parlons ici, & non pas de ce mouvement interieur de joye & de ſatisfaction qu'ils peuvent produire en nous, chacun ſuppoſant ſecrettement qu'vne ſeule choſe ne ſçauroit le produire toûjours, & que le changement, la varieté & la nouveauté en font la principale [18] partie. Si quelqu'vn veut donc choiſir vn plaiſir pour toute ſa vie, je croy qu'il viendra bien-toſt à bout de n'en avoir aucun. Ie ſuis tout à fait de contraire avis, dit Plotine, & vous ne prenez pas garde que chacun de ces plaiſirs dont nous parlons à vne varieté & vne étenduë preſque infinie, qui ſe découvrent tous les jours davantage à ceux qui s'y attachent entierement, & le leur rendent toûjours nouveau, quoy que toûjours le meſme. Si cela eſt, reprit Herminius, il faut donc bien choiſir ceux auſquels on ſe veut attacher. Ie vous aſſure, ajouſta la melancholique Noromate, que ce mot de choix eſt trop ſerieux pour cela, & ſelon moi, il les faut ſuivre ſelon ſon inclination : car je ſuppoſe que les plaiſirs dont nous parlons, ſont proprement les [19] plaiſirs innocens ; ainſi n'ayant point à deliberer s'ils ſont juſtes ou injuſtes, je conclus qu'il faut les prendre ſelon que le hazard les offre, & ſelon qu'ils ſe rapportent à noſtre humeur : car enfin, il n'y a rien de certain à decider là-deſſus. Malgré mon incertitude, dit Artimas, je connois que la belle Noromate a raiſon. Ce n'eſt pas, ajouſta-t-il, que qui me propoſeroit d'aller à la chaſſe par vn vilain temps comme font les chaſſeurs determinez, je n'aimaſſe mieux aller à la Comedie. On ne vous dit pas, dit alors Plotine, que vous ſoyez obligé d'accepter tous les plaiſirs qu'on vous propose : car pour moy, je n'aime non plus la peſche que vous aimez la chaſſe, & je n'ay jamais compris qu'il y euſt vn grand plaiſir à voir vn grand nom- [20] bre de poiſſons ſe battre dans des filets, troubler l'eau, ſe laiſſer prendre ſans pouvoir faire reſiſtance. Sçachant que vous danſez parfaitement bien, dit Philiſte, je m'imagine que vous preferez le bal à tous les plaiſirs. Le bal eſt aſſurément vne tres-agreable choſe, repliqua Plotine ; mais comme les Dames ne danſent de bonne grace dans le monde qu'vn certain nombre d'années, je ſonge déja quel autre plaiſir je chercheray dans deux ou trois ans. La muſique en eſt vn qui peut durer toute la vie, dit Meriandre. I'en conviens, repliqua Plotine ; mais il me ſemble que quand vne femme qui a eſté aſſez belle n'entend plus chanter les chanſons qu'on a faites pour elles, & que l'admirable Lambert & la charmante Hilaire ne diſent plus devant elle que [21] des airs nouveaux, faits pour des beautez naiſſantes, elle n'y prend plus gueres de plaiſir, & je ſuis perſuadée que celles qui n'y ont plus de part, & qui jugent qu'elles n'y en peuvent plus avoir, n'aiment plus tant la Muſique. Mais du moins pour la Comedie, dit Themiſte, demeurez d'accord que c'eſt vn plaiſir de tous les âges, de toutes les ſaiſons, & de toutes les humeurs : car il y a des poëmes ſerieux, d'autres plus enjoüez. C'eſt vn tableau de toutes les paſſions ; les beautez de l'Histoire & de la Fable y ſont bien ſouvent jointes enſemble ; le vice eſt puni, & la vertu recompensée ; & chacun y peut trouver quelque choſe ſelon ſon gouſt : Principalement, inter rompit Plotine en ſoûriant, quand on a le cœur rempli d'ambition, puiſque [22] c'eſt là qu'on voit tous les grands évenemens de l'Histoire ; mais pour moy, j'avouë ſincerement que quoy que j'aime fort à voir tous les beaux ouvrages, ſur tout quand ils ſont nouveaux, je ne voudrois pas que ce fuſt mon vnique plaiſir, & il ceſſeroit de l'eſtre ſi je n'en avois jamais d'autre. Pour moy, dit Cleocrite, je les prens comme le hazard me les donne ſans m'en mettre en peine, je ne les cherche ni ne les fuis, je croy qu'on peut chercher la Fortune & la trouver ; mais il me ſemble que les plaiſirs fuyent ceux qui les cherchent avec tant d'empreſſement, & que la peine qu'on ſe donne pour cela, les fait acheter trop cher. Vous avez raiſon belle Cleocrite, luy dit Artimas, il arrive bien ſouvent que les grands plaiſirs premeditez en- [23] nuyent à la fin, & il m'eſt arrivé pluſieurs fois en ma vie de me divertir & de m'ennuyer tour à tour en vne de ces longues feſtes, où tous les divertiſſemens ſont en foule, auſſi ſont-elles pluſtoſt faites pour faire paroiſtre la magnificence des grands Princes qui les donnent, que pour le plaiſir de ceux qui en ſont. Comme on m'accuſe de ne contredire jamais perſonne, dit Meriandre, je me trouve aujourd'huy fort embaraſſé en voyant tant de perſonnes que j'eſtime, avoir des ſentimens differens, & j'ay preſque envie de ne plus parler, afin de n'eſtre pas indigne du nom qu'on m'a donné aujourd'huy. Et pour meriter celui d'opiniaſtre, dit Herminius, qu'on m'a donné ſans trop de fondement, je ſoutiens qu'il faut choiſir en toutes [24] choses, & conſiderer vne fois en ſa vie, ce que tous les plaiſirs ont de bon ou de mauvais. Mais, dites-moy, interrompis-je, ſi vous mettez le jeu en general, entre les plaiſirs. Non, repliqua-t-il en riant, je le mets entre les paſſions, & toute la compagnie trouvant qu'il avoit raiſon, on n'examina point celuy-là. Auſſi bien, dit Artimas, s'expoſeroit-on à déplaire à trop de gens, ſi quelqu'vn s'aviſoit de blâmer le jeu. Croyez-moy, dit Plotine, ne nous amuſons point à blâmer nul des plaiſirs, il n'y en ſçauroit trop avoir, laiſſez aimer la chaſſe aux chaſſeurs, la muſique aux ames tendres, la Comedie à ceux qui aiment les belles choſes, la danſe à ceux qui danſent bien, la promenade & la converſation à ceux qui ont l'eſprit [25] galant, les ſuperbes feſtes à ceux qui les peuvent donner, les carrouſels, les courſes de bague, & les autres grand plaiſirs aux grands Princes, & ne condamnez pas meſme ceux qui pourroient ſe divertir à jouër aux noiſettes. A ce que je voy, dit la belle Noromate, vous ne blâmez donc pas ceux qui s'amuſent à jouër à de petits jeux, comme le jeu des Proverbes, des ſoûpirs, de l'oracle, du Roman, du propos interrompu, des fontaines, des tableaux & pluſieurs autres où il ne faut pas tant d'eſprit. Ie n'ay garde de les condamner, dit Plotine, & je vous aſſure que j'y au joüé deux ou trois fois en ma vie, avec beaucoup de joye ; mais je regarde plûtot ces ſortes de choſes-là, comme vn amuſement, que com- [26] me vn plaiſir : on n'envoyeroit pas prier de jouër à de petits jeux, comme on envoye prier de Bal & de la Comedie : deux perſonnes ſeules ne s'aviſeront pas de jouër aux Proverbes, comme on jouë à l'Imperiale. Mais lorſqu'vn aſſez grand nombre de perſonnes ſe trouvent enſemble, qu'vn certain eſprit de joye regne dans la compagnie, & que ne pouvant ni parler ſerieuſement, ni ſe promener, on cherche ſimplement à badiner avec quelque ſorte d'eſprit, je ne deſ-approuve point les petits jeux, pourveu qu'on les prenne pour ce qu'ils ſont. Mais, reprit Herminius, ſi on les prend pour ce qu'ils ſont, on les prendra pour des bagatelles qui ne doivent pas occuper des perſonnes raiſonnables, & j'aimerois autant voir vn grand [27] Architecte employer ſon temps à faire vn chaſteau de carte comme font les enfans, que de voir des gens d'eſprit jouër à bon chat bon rat. Themiſte connoiſſant qu'il feroit plaiſir à Plotine de ſouſtenir les jeux, s'oppoſa à Herminius, & luy dit que ce qui eſtoit jeu ne s'appelloit pas occupation, & que les Proverbes dont il railloit eſtoient autrefois vne invention que les grands hommes avoient trouvée pour fixer la verité de toutes choſes, & la répandre agreablement dans le monde. Cela eſtoit bon, dit Herminius, dans l'enfance de la Morale ; mais aujourd'huy qu'elle eſt ſi vielles qu'on ne la connoiſt quaſi plus, on peut paſſer toute ſa vie ſans proverbes & ſans joüer à vn jeu qui force de s'en ſouvenir. Toutes [28] les Dames & les autres hommes témoignant prendre plaiſir à cette diſpute, on les laiſſa parler ſans les interrompre. Ie ſçay bien, dit Themiſte, qu'on ſe paſſe toute ſa vie tres-facilement de joüer aux Proverbes ; mais je ſousſtiens qu'on ne peut ſe paſſer de joye & d'amuſement, & que les jeux d'eſprit que vous blâmez tant, ſont auſſi vieux que le monde ; que les grands Rois & les grandes Princeſſes s'en ſont divertis ; que les plus ſages hommes d'entre les Grecs les ont pratiquez dans leurs feſtins ; que les anciens Romains ne les ont pas ignorez ; que le Comte Balthaſar dans ſon parfait Courtiſan qui paſſe pour le modelle de la politeſſe, parle du jeu d'inventer chacun vn jeu, de celuy des Folies de chacun, & de plu- [29] ſieurs autres. Trois ou quatres Auteurs Italiens en ont fait des volumes entiers ; il s'en trouve meſme parmi les François : les jeux de Siene ont eſté celebres, les rebus, les enigmes, les deviſes, ne ſont-ce pas proprement des jeux ? Croyez-moy, mon cher Opiniâtre, pourſuivit l'Ambitieux, il y a plus de jeux au monde qu'on ne croit, tout y eſt preſque bagatelle : c'eſt pourquoy n'en retranchons point puiſqu'il y auroit trop à retrancher. Mais, interrompit Plotine, encore voudrois-je bien ſçavoir dans quel temps on s'eſt aviſé d'inventer de ces ſortes de jeux d'eſprit. Premierement, dit Herminius en raillant, je croy que le jeu du Corbillon fut inventé pars les premier Poëtes, qui ayant beaucoup de peine à mettre [30] de la raiſon en rime, accouſtumérent les enfans à jouër à ce jeu-là. Quoy que vous diſiez cela pour mépriſer les jeux, reprit Themiſte, je le trouve bien penſé, & j'ay envie de croire que cela eſt vray. Mais pour répondre à ce que me demande la belle Plotine, je diray que les jeux ſont originaires de Lydie, & qu'ils ſont beaucoup plus vieux que le plus vieil Hiſtorien, qu'on appelle le Pere de L'Histoire. En effet, ce fameux Auteur rapporte que pendant vne famine aſſez grande, les Lydiens ne purent trouver d'autre invention pour empeſcher les peuples de s'affliger, & pour épargner les vivres, que d'inventer des jeux qui les occupoient, & les divertiſſoient ; & je croy que c'eſt cette origine qui a introuduit vne façon [31] de parler, qui eſt encore parmi le peuple, lorſqu'il veut dire qu'vn homme aime paſſionnément le jeu, Il en perd, dit-il, le boire & le manger. Ainſi ce qui vous paroiſt vne bagatelle, a eſté vn grand remede pour le plus grand mal de la vie. Mais pour en parler plus ſerieuſement, on apprend par ce meſme Hiſtorien, qu'Amaſis Roy d'Egypte qui vivoit du temps de Cyrus, ſe divertiſſoit à des jeux d'eſprit : en effet, il envoya vn jour vers vn homme dont le nom a reſiſté au temps & eſt venu juſqu'à nous, pour luy demander ce qu'il faloit qu'il répondiſt au Roy d'Ethiopie, qui luy demandoit s'il ſçavoit bien ce qu'il pourroit faire pour boire toute la mer. L'aſſurant que s'il pouvoit trouver quelque choſe de raiſonnable à [32] luy répondre, il luy cederoit pluſieurs villes, & que s'il ne trouvoit rien de bon à dire, il en perdroit autant qu'il en pourroit gagner. Le Roy d'Egypte fit cette propoſition par vne lettre qui fut portée pendant vn feſtin que faiſoit le Roy de Corinthe aux plus ſages hommes de Grece, celuy qui la receut comme vn jeu, y répondit de meſme ; mais il le fit tres-ingenieuſement : car il dit à l'Envoyé de ce Prince, Vous direz au Roy voſtre maiſtre, qu'il n'a qu'à mander au Roy d'Ethiopie qu'il faſſe auparavant arreſter tous les fleuves & toutes les rivieres, afin qu'il ne boive rien davantage & qu'aprés cela il fera ce qu'il deſire. Il eſt aiſé de juger que cette demande eſtoit vn jeu d'eſprit. Eumetis fille de Roy de Corinthe acquit auſſi [33] beaucoup de reputation pour ſçavoir expliquer les Enigmes les plus difficiles. Enfin, les Rois, les Philoſophes, les Grecs, les anciens Romains, & la nouvelle Italie, n'ont pas mépriſé les jeux d'eſprit : il ne faut donc pas trouver étrange qu'on s'y amuſe quelquefois. Si vous rapportiez fidellement, répondit Herminius, toutes les galanteries du temps d'Amaſis Roy d'Egypte, vous verriez bien que nous ne nous accommoderions gueres de leurs couſtumes. Ie conſens, dit Themiſte, qu'on ne les ſuive pas en tout : je veux meſme bien qu'on ne ſe divertiſſe pas des meſmes jeux qui les ont divertis ; mais je demande ſeulement que vous confeſſiez que les jeux ſont auſſi vieux que le monde, que des perſonnes de grande qualité, de grand [34] eſprit & d'vne grande vertu s'en ſont divertis, qu'en des Cours tres-galantes on s'y eſt amuſé, & qu'on s'en peut encore divertir. Si j'en eſtois creuë, dit alors la belle Plotine, nous y jouerions tout à l'heure. Ie ne meriterois pas le nom que je porte, dit le complaiſant Meriandre, ſi je pouvois vous contredire. Et pour moy, dit l'opiniaſtre Herminius, je merite ſi ſouvent le mien, qu'encore que je ne cede pas, je veux bien ne m'oppoſer point à la belle Plotine. Ie me ſuis deja aſſez expliquée, dit Cleocrite, pour faire que perſonne ne doute que je veux tout ce qu'on voudra. Comme mon nom, dit alors l'incredule Philiſte, ne m'oblige à rien, je conſens d'eſſayer ſi je m'y divertiray : car je n'y ay jamais joüé. I'y ay joüée [35] comme vn autre, dit Noromate, & je m'y ſuis toujours ennuyée. Ie veux donc entreprendre, dit Themiſte, de faire en ſorte que vous ne vous y ennuyiez pas. De grace, dit Artimas, laiſſez-moy la liberté de douter, ſi je m'y ſeray diverti ou ennuyé : car ma prevoyance ne va point juſqu'à ſçavoir ce qui en ſera. Ie le veux bien, dit Themiſte : mais il faut que la compagnie me permettre d'inventer vn jeu : car la nouveauté eſt vn charme pour tous les plaiſirs. Toute la compagnie ayant conſenti à cette propoſition, il reſva vn moment, & puis il en preſcrivit les loix : Premierement, dit-il, je mettray dans des billets divers caracteres de gens, ou diverſes autres choſes à ma fantaiſie. Ie rouleray les billets, je les meſle- [36] ray, & aprés les avoir bien meſlez dans vn vaſe, tous ceux de la compagnie ſeront obligez de parler ſur le ſujet que leur billet leur marquera, & pour moy qui ſeray le maiſtre du jeu, je ne prendray point de billet ; mais aprés avoir écouté tout ce que chacun aura dit, je ſeray obligé de parler à mon tour, de faire l'eloge de ceux qui auront bien parlé, & de blâmer ceux qui n'auront pas bien fait. Et comme le hazard agit toûjour ſans choix, je comprens qu'il peut produire d'aſſez agreables effets, en ce jeu-là, où l'on ſera quelquefois obligé de parler de ce qu'on ne ſçait pas, ou contre ſes propres ſentimens. Quoy que je craigne vn peu, dit Plotine, de ne ſortir pas à mon honneur d'vn jeu, où je prevois qu'il [37] faut beaucoup d'eſprit, je conſens qu'on jouë à celuy-là. Tout le monde ayant donné ſa voix, on fit les billets, où l'on écrivit ce qui ſuit.

Vne bonne & une méchante lettre d'amour.
Pourquoy un beau ſot eſt plus ſot qu'vn autre.
Vn faux brave.
Vn ſçavant incommode.
Vn ignorant qui fait l'habile homme.
Vne histoire.
Vn conte.
La deſcription d'vne belle maiſon de campagne.
Vn homme qui parle trop.
Vn bel eſprit ridicule.
La difference du flateur & du complaiſant.
[38]
Vn hypocrite,
Des vers d'Elegie.
Vn galimatias pompeux, qui puiſſe tromper les eſprits mediocres.
Vn rebus.
Vne chanson.
Vn homme qui s'ennuye par tout.
Vn homme qui ne ſçais pas vivre.
Parler contre l'amour.
Deffendre l'amour.
Vne enigme.
Vn souhait.
Tous les divers caracteres des coquettes.
Vn Madrigal.
Vn empreſſé.
Vn brave brutal.
Vne deviſe.
Vn plaintif qui ſe lamente de tout.
Vn indifferent enjoüé qui ne s'inquiette de rien.
Qu'il faut toûjours vn confident en amour.
[39]
Qu'il faut point de confident en amour.

Aprés que tous ces billets furent écrits, la belle Noromate demanda pourquoy il y en avoit plus qu'il n'y avoit de gens dans la compagnie. C'eſt afin, répondit le maiſtre du jeu, de faire que le hazard ſoit plus grand, qu'il y ait plus de varieté dans les ſujets ſur leſquels le ſort peut tomber, & que par conſequent on ne puiſſe ſe preparer ſur rien. La compagnie eſtant ſatisfaite de cette raiſon, & ayant trouvé tous les billets ingenieuſement remplis, on les meſla & on les diſtribua ſelon qu'on ſe trouva aſſis ; mais il ne fut pas permis de voir ſon billet, qu'on ne fuſt tout preſt de parler. La belle Plotine eſtant à la premiere place ouvrit le ſien, [40] & y trouva ce qui ſuit, Pourquoy vn beau ſot eſt plus ſot qu'vn autre.

Ie vous aſſure, dit l'Enjoüée en riant, que je ſuis bien plus heureuſe que je ne penſois : car je craignois fort d'eſtre obligée de bâtir vne maiſon, & qu'il ne m'arrivaſt de confondre les corridors & les corniches, les baſes & les chapiteaux. I'apprehendois encore étrangement d'avoir à parler contre l'Amour : car je le trouve aſſez neceſſaire à la politeſſe du monde. Ie rends donc graces à la Fortune, de ce qu'elle m'oblige à parler ſur vn ſujet qui eſt ſelon mon ſentiment, & où il y a peu de choſes à dire. Il demeure pourtant certain que la beauté eſt vn grand avantage en toutes ſortes de choſes, excepté à vn ſot homme. Parmi les femmes, la beauté fait excuſer [41] beaucoup de defauts ; mais parmi les hommes elle redouble les mauvaiſes qualitez. Vne belle perſonne ſans nul merite d'ailleurs, pare le bal & le cours ; elle n'a qu'à ne parler point pour eſtre aimable, c'eſt du moins vn beau tableau : mais pour vn beau ſot il est cent fois plus inſupportable que s'il n'eſtoit pas beau. La raiſon que j'en conçois, c'eſt qu'vn homme qui n'eſt pas bien fait, n'attire point les regards, on ne s'attend à rien, il ſe ſauve dans la preſſe, ſans qu'on s'apperçoive de ſa ſotiſe ; on n'y ſonge pas, & quand on y ſongeroit, comme ſa mine n'a rien promis de bon, on ne luy reproche pas d'avoir trompé les gens. Mais lorſqu'on voit vn beau ſot avec vne belle perruque blonde, le teint d'vne belle [42] Dame, de beaux yeux bleus qui ne diſent rien, vn rire niais qui ne ſert qu'à monſtrer de belles dents, vne grande taille qui n'a point de liberté, vne phyſionomie ſtupide & fade, qui ne ſignifie quoy que ce ſoit, avec vne ſotte gloire ſans fondement : il faut bien avoüer qu'vn beau ſot de cette eſpece eſt plus ſot que s'il n'eſtoit pas beau, & qu'il ennuye bien davantage ; parce qu'on a dépit d'avoir eſté trompé pour vn moment ; parce que rien n'eſt ſi mal enſemble que la ſottiſe & la beauté. C'eſt proprement vn grand & magnifique portail qui promet vn Palais, & au delà duquel on ne trouve qu'vne miſerable cabane ſans nuls meubles. Ie croy meſme qu'on peut dire encore qu'vn homme n'eſt pas obligé d'eſtre beau ; mais [43] qu'il eſt obligé d'avoir de l'eſprit, & de ſçavoir vivre ; de ſorte que lorſqu'on trouve tout le contraire, & qu'on en trouve vn qui a la beauté d'vne femme, & n'a pas l'eſprit d'vn homme, on en eſt fort rebuté. Et pour aller encore au delà des termes de mon billet, j'ajoûteray qu'vn beau ſot quand il eſt vieux, eſt encore plus ſot avec ſes vieux attraits, que quand il eſt jeune, parce qu'il n'y a plus nulle eſperance qu'il ſe corrige de ſa ſottiſe. Il y a meſme plus d'vne eſpece de beaux ſots ; mais ceux que je mets au premier rang ſont de beaux ſots, audacieux & languiſſans tout enſemble, qui s'écoutent, quand meſme ils ne diſent rien, qui ne penſent jamais, ni à ce qu'on leur dit ni à ce qu'ils diſent, qui s'admirent ſans ſe con- [44] noiſtre, & qui ne laiſſent pas de porter leur ſottiſe & leur beauté par tout pour incommoder les gens raiſonnables.

La belle Plotine ayant ceſſé de parler, tout le monde crut connoiſtre quelqu'vn du caractere qu'elle avoit repreſenté, & chacun ſe vouloit dire vn nom à l'oreille, mais le maiſtre du jeu impoſa ſilence, & dit qu'il ne faloit jamais ſe faire vn jeu des defauts d'autruy, que les ſots de cette eſpece eſtoient aiſez à connoiſtre, & qu'il n'eſtoit point beſoin de les nommer. Enſuite Philiſte ouvrit ſon billet, & trouva que c'eſtoit à elle à faire voir la difference du flateur & du complaiſant. Cette belle perſonne reſva vn moment, & parla en ſuite en ces termes:

Le hazard a ſans doute aſſez [45] heureuſement rencontré en m'obligeant à parler de la difference qu'il y a entre l'honneſte complaiſance & la flaterie. I'ay vne ſi grande averſion pour tous les flateurs en general, que cette averſion me tiendra peut-eſtre lieu d'eſprit, & me fera mieux découvrir les baſſeſſes de la flaterie ; du moins ſçay-je que je n'ay pas en moy, ce qui fait le plus vniverſellement ſouffrir les flateurs. Car enfin il demeure pour conſtant que l'on ne pardonne rien ſi aiſément qu'vne flaterie dite de bonne grace, & cela vient ſans doute de ce qu'on eſt ſon premier flateur à ſoy-meſme, & qu'on ſe dit preſque toûjours plus de bien de ſoy que les autres n'en diſent & n'en doivent dire ; de ſorte que la flaterie eſt toûjours plus prés de ce que nous [46] penſons de nous que de la verité, & a ſans ceſſe vne intelligence ſecrette dans noſtre cœur, dont il ſe faut deffier. Ceux qui aiment à eſtre flatez s'eſtiment trop, & les flateurs pour l'ordinaire le deviennent, parce qu'ils ſentent bien qu'ils n'ont pas aſſez de merite ni aſſez de vertu pour plaire ou acquerir du credit ſans le ſecours de la flaterie, & l'on peut dire qu'ils ont mauvaiſe opinion & d'eux & d'autruy. Mais avant que de diſtinguer la complaiſance raiſonnable de celle qui ne l'eſt pas, il ne ſera peut-eſtre pas mal-à-propos de faire vne legere peinture d'vn flateur. Sa premiere qualité eſt de renoncer à la verité ſans nul ſcrupule, & de ne l'employer jamais ; d'eſtre incapable de nulle amitié, de n'aimer que ſon plai- [47] ſir & ſon intereſt, de ne parler que par rapport à luy, de ne s'attacher jamais qu'à la Fortune : il n'a point de temperament particulier, il devient ce que ſon intereſt demande qu'il ſoit, ſerieux avec ceux qui le ſont, gay avec les enjoüez ; mais jamais malheureux avec ceux qui le deviennent, car il les abandonne dés qu'il peut connoiſtre que la Fortune les quitte. Auſſi ſuis-je de l'avis d'vn de mes amis qui a dit parlant des flateurs,

La miſere d'autruy réveille leur malice
Au lieu d'exciter leur pitié:
Pour meriter leur haine & leur intimité,
C'eſt aſſez qu'on n'ait pas la Fortune propice.
Cette aveugle Deeſſe eſt maiſtreſſe en leurs coœurs:
[48]
De tous ceux qu'elle éleve ils ſont adorateurs,
A tous ceux qu'elle frape ils declarent la guerre.
L'injustice & la fraude ont des charmes pour eux.
Ils ſont l'horreur du Ciel, les monſtres de la terre,
Et le dernier malheur de tous les malheureux.

Mais pour en revenir où j'en eſtois, le flateur n'eſt jamais vniforme dans ſes ſentimens, il eſt capable de ſe contredire toûjours, de recevoir toute ſorte d'impreſſions, n'y en ayant point qui luy ſoient particulieres ; il veut tout ce qu'on veut, & ne veut jamais rien que pour ſon deſſein. Il fait des vertus de tous les vices quand il luy plaiſt ; il eſt auſſi inſupportable à ceux qui ſont au deſſous de luy [49] qu'il eſt ſoûmis à ceux dont il a beſoin : car comme il paſſe toute ſa vie à flater ceux qui ſont au deſſus de ſa condition, il veut eſtre flaté de ceux qui ſont au deſſous. La diſſimulation eſt ſa compagne ordinaire, il n'a point de patrie, point de parens, point d'amis, & ſouvent point de Religion. Les vrais flateurs ne ſe contentent pas de louër ceux qui ne meritent pas d'eſtre loüez : mais pour plaire à ceux-là meſme dont ils changent les vices en vertus, ils changent autant qu'ils peuvent les vertus des autres en vices ; & la médiſance & la calomnie ſont tres-ſouvent employées par vn veritable flateur, pour plaire à ceux à qui il fait ſa cour. Il n'advertit jamais ſes amis des fautes qu'ils font pendant leur bonne fortune ; [50] mais s'ils tombent, il eſt le premier à inſulter à leur malheur, afin de ſe rendre agreable à ceux qui leur ſuccedent. Enfin je ſoûtiens hardiment qu'vn flateur eſt le plus laſche de tous les hommes : mais entre tous les flateurs, ceux qui approchent des Grands ſont les plus meſchans & les plus à craindre ; & on peut dire de la flatterie en cette rencontre, qu'en s'attachant aux Grands, elle fait quelquefois comme cette herbe rampante qui couvre les murailles, qu'elle deſtruit dans la ſuite : car il eſt certain que la flaterie en trompant les Grands, & à l'égard d'eux-meſmes, les rend bien ſouvent injuſtes, & enſuite malheureux. La flaterie n'eſt pas ſeulement dangereuſe dans les Cours, elle [51] l'eſt en amitié, en amour, & en toutes ſortes d'eſtats : car il y a des Amans flateurs, auſſi bien que des Amis & des Courtiſans. Il y a pourtant cette difference, que ſouvent les Amans flateurs croyent vne partie des flateries qu'ils disent, & que les flateurs d'intereſt parlent toûjours contre leur ſentiment. Et puis à dire la verité, la flaterie en amour n'eſt pas ſi dangereuſe : car quand les femmes ont de la raiſon, elles ſe deffendent de tout ce que les Amans leur diſent, & c'eſt le poinct le plus important de la Morale des Dames, que de douter de tout ce qu'on leur dit en galanterie. Mais enfin ſoit à la Cour, ſoit en amour ou en amitié, c'eſt la marque d'vne ame grande & noble de n'aimer point la flaterie, & d'eſtre incapa- [52] ble de flater. Il faut aſſurément regarder la flaterie comme vne eſclave qui eſt toûjours baſſe, rampante & dépendante de la Fortune. Il y a des flateurs de toutes conditions, & pour toutes ſortes d'intereſts. Ceux qui ne le ſont qu'en paraſites font le moins de mal, parce que ceux meſme qui s'en divertiſſent les meſpriſent : mais les plus dangereux de tous, ſont ceux qui contrefont les amis ſinceres : car il y a des flateurs qui parlent eux-meſmes contre la flaterie, s'introduiſent dans le monde comme s'ils eſtoient de veritables amis, & trompent fort ſouvent des gens fort habiles ; ainſi l'on peut dire que la flaterie ſerieuſe eſt la plus dangereuſe de toutes. I'ay mille fois en ma vie fait reflexion pourquoy l'on eſt plus ſouvent trompé [53] en amis qu'en nulle autre choſe. Ie connois des gens d'eſprit qui n'ont jamais eſtre trompez en nulle affaire d'intereſt, tant ils ſont clairvoyans & habiles, & tant ils prennent de ſoin à s'empeſcher d'eſtre ſurpris. En effet, quand on prend des domeſtiques on s'informe tres-ſoigneuſement des lieux où ils ont eſté employez, depuis les Intendans juſqu'aux Laquais : & ces meſmes gens ſi habiles & ſi ſages, & qui apportent tant de precaution à n'eſtre point trompez dans de petits intereſts, prennent hardiment des amis ſur les premieres flateries qu'on leur dit, & engagent leur cœur avant que de connoiſtre ſi ceux à qui ils le donnent en ſont dignes. Cependant je ſuis perſuadée qu'on devroit apporter mille fois plus de [54] ſoin à bien connoiſtre ceux dont on veut faire ſes amis, que ceux qu'on prend pour ſes domeſtiques : car on ne peut, tout au plus, confier que ſon argent à ceux qui ſervent, & l'on confie ſes ſecrets à ſes amis. C'eſt pourquoy il faut avant que de leur donner ce rang-là bien examiner s'ils le meritent, & bien conſiderer ſi la complaiſance qu'ils ont, eſt de celle qui naiſt de l'amitié, & qui eſt conduite par la raiſon : car il ne faut pas qu'on s'imagine que je veuïlle bannir l'honneſte complaiſance du monde. Les veritables amis ne doivent pas eſtre ni grondeurs, ni bruſques, ni deſagreables ; ils doivent louër & mieux louër que les flateurs, & d'aurant plus que pour s'acquerir le droit de reprendre leurs amis en quelques occa- [55] ſions, il faut qu'ils les louënt en d'autres quand ils en ſont dignes : car la plus ſincere marque d'amitié qu'on puiſſe donner, eſt d'advertir genereuſement ſes amis des fautes qu'ils font ou qu'ils ſont preſts de faire. Il faut meſme courageuſement ſe mettre au hazard de leur déplaire en quelque ſorte, plûtot que de les expoſer à faire quelque action dont ils ſeroient blâmez. Quand on a fait auſſi quelque choſe qu'on connoiſt ſoy-meſme qui n'eſt pas bien, il faut prendre garde ſi nos amis nous le diſent, ou du moins en demeurent d'accord avec nous : car ſi cela n'eſt pas, il faut conclure, ou qu'ils ſont peu éclairez, ou qu'ils ſont foibles, ou qu'ils ſont flateurs. Ie ſçay bien que les commencemens de la flaterie ſont tres-diffi- [56] ciles à connoiſtre : la civilité & la politeſſe du monde la cachent d'abord, l'habitude la fait enſuite ſouffrir, & dés qu'on s'y eſt accouſtumé on n'eſt plus capable de la connoiſtre. L'honneſte complaiſance, qui eſt le pretexte dont la flaterie ſe veut couvrir, rend en effet l'amitié plus douce, ſert à l'ambition, à l'amour, & eſt, pour ainſi dire, le lien de la ſocieté. Sans elle les opiniaſtres, les ambitieux, les coleres, & enfin tous les gens de temperamens violens & contraires ne pourroient vivre enſemble. Elle vnit, elle adoucit, elle lie la ſocieté, mais c'eſt avec vn air libre, qui n'a rien de bas ne de ſervile, qui ne ſent ni l'empreſſement, ni l'intereſt, ni la diſſimulation : mais la baſſe complaiſance, ou pour mieux dire, la flaterie ſe déguiſe [57] en tout, elle flatte en la beauté, en l'âge, en l'eſprit ; elle louë les amis de ceux qu'elle veut flater, & blaſme leurs ennemis, quels qu'ils ſoient, & prend enfin vn grand circuit pour aſſieger vn coœur dont elle ſe veut emparer. Les veritables amis amoindriſſent les offices qu'ils rendent, & les flateurs les exagerent. Les amis ſinceres ne ſçauroient avoir plus de joye, que de voir que les gens qu'ils aiment ſont aimez de tout le monde : mais les flateurs craignent au contraire, que d'autres ne plaiſent plus qu'eux, & c'eſt proprement dans leur coœur qu'on peut trouver de la jalouſie ſans affection. Il ſe faut pourtant bien garder, en s'empeſchant de tomber dans vn defaut, de tomber dans vn autre, & d'eſtre incivil & [58] contrediſant. La complaiſance des honneſtes gens eſt tres-aiſée à diſcerner quand on y prend garde, elle n'a jamais d'intereſt particulier, elle regarde en general la bien-ſeance du monde ; c'eſt preciſément ce qu'on appelle ſçavoir vivre ; il ne peut y avoir de regles preciſes pour cela, le jugement & la vertu en doivent preſcrire les loix. Il ne faut point eſtre complaiſant ni pour tromper ſon Prince ſi l'on eſt à la Cour, ni pour abuſer ſes amis. Il faut que la diſſimulation, le menſonge, ni nul intereſt ſervile, ne s'y meſlent jamais. Il ne faut pas enfin ſe faire vn meſtier de la flaterie, qui eſt aſſurément vn poiſon plus dangereux qu'on ne penſe : car dans le monde il n'y a preſque point de flateurs qui n'en puiſſent [59] avoir d'autres ; & ſi les Princes qui ont vn eſprit fort éclairé, obſervent ſoigneuſement tout ce qui vient à leur connoiſſance, ils verront ſouvent la flaterie dans leurs Cours, en mille figures differentes. Elle ſe trouve dans les bals, dans les balets, dans les feſtes, dans les maſcarades ; quelquefois meſme aux lieux les plus ſaints, d'où elle devroit n'oſer approcher, & elle eſt pour l'ordinaire plus parée & plus ajuſtée que la complaiſance ſincere, qui ſe fie à ſes propres charmes. La flaterie enfin a vn langage qui luy eſt propre, elle ne louë jamais que par des exclamations, & qu'avec deſſein de tromper. Ie ſçay bien qu'il y a des flateurs de temperament, qui ne penſent à rien en particulier, & qui par vn deſſein general de plaire à tout le monde, ont [60] vne certaine complaiſance fade qui déplaiſt : ces gens-là ne ſont pas meſchans, mais pour l'ordinaire ils ont peu d'eſprit, & ſentant bien qu'ils ne pourroient pas ſouſtenir leur opinion s'ils en pouvoient avoir vne, ils cedent à tout le monde, & prennent le parti d'eſtre complaiſans de profeſſion. Pour ces gens-là ils me font pitié, & je me contente de les éviter ſans les haïr : mais pour les flateurs qui veulent arracher l'eſtime & l'amitié des honneſtes gens, & des Rois, & des Favoris des grand Princes, par des artifices qu'on devroit punir, je les hai d'vne telle ſorte, & je les connois ſi bien, que je penſe me pouvoir vanter qu'ils ne me tromperont jamais. Ie ſuis perſuadée que le moyen le plus ſeur pour ſe garder [61] de la flaterie, c'eſt de ſe bien connoiſtre ſoy-meſme : car ſelon moy, il eſt plus aiſé que de connoiſtre les autres. Vn des grand maux que produit la flaterie, c'eſt qu'elle met ſouvent de la deffiance dans l'eſprit de ceux qui la mépriſent, & que cela eſt cauſe que quelquefois on fait injuſtice à la complaiſance raiſonnable des honneſtes gens : & pour vous dire la verité, je ne porterois pas le nom d'Incredule que la compagnie m'a donné aujourd'huy ſans la flaterie, & j'avouë ingenûment que j'ay mieux aimé douter de tout, que de m'expoſer à eſtre trompée en croyant trop legerement toutes les flateries qu'on m'a dites.

Philiſte ayant ceſſé de parley fut loüée de toute la compagnie ; mais Themiſte leur dit que cela eſtoit [62] contre les regles du Ieu, & qu'il n'appartenoit qu'à luy de louër ou de blaſmer, quand tout le monde auroit parlé. On rit vn moment de la gravité de Themiſte : aprés quoy Cleocrite ſuivant ſon rang, ouvrit ſon billet, & trouva que c'eſtoit à elle à dire vn Madrigal ; elle en eut vne extrême joye, & ſe haſta de reciter celuy qui ſuit, que personne de cette aimable troupe n'avoit encore veu.

MADRIGAL

Sans nul ſujet d'inquietude,
Ie prefere la ſolitude
Au bal, au carrouſel, aux plaiſirs les plus doux,
On dit par tout que je vous aime,
Belle Iris, jugez-en vous meſme,
Ie ſuis nay pour aimer, & je ne voy que vous.
[63]

Ce Madrigal, dit Plotine, eſt de ceux que j'aime le mieux ; il eſt ſimple & naturel, il n'y a point trop d'eſprit : car on en voit où il y en a tant, que l'amour n'y paroiſt pas. Toute la compagnie convint de ce que diſoit Plotine, & l'incertain Artimas ouvrit ſon billet, & trouva que c'eſtoit à luy à examiner s'il faut toûjours vn confident en amour. Il regarda ſon billet pluſieurs fois, il reſva, il commença par vn mot, & en dit vn autre vn moment aprés, enſuite dequoy il parla de cette ſorte.

C'eſt eſtre traité tres-avantageuſement par la Fortune, d'avoir à ſouſtenir vne opinion qui a pour ſoy la raiſon & l'vſage. En effet, depuis que l'amour fait des heureux & des miſerables, on n'a jamais pû ſe paſſer de confidens & [64] de confidentes, & je ne croi pas qu'il y ait rien de plus vniverſellement eſtabli, ni de plus neceſſaire dans vne grande paſſion ; je ne croy meſme pas poſſible de n'en avoir point. Quand on commence d'aimer on n'eſt encore obligé à nul ſecret, de ſorte qu'il n'eſt pas croyable qu'vn homme qui devient Amant n'en diſe rien à ſon meilleur ami, & quand le premier pas de la confidence eſt fait, il faut aller juſques au bout : car rien n'eſt plus dangereux que de dire vn ſecret à demi : mais enfin, quand cela ne ſeroit pas ainſi, le moyen de renfermer dans ſon cœur toutes les douleurs ou toutes les joyes que l'amour inſpire ? ſi on eſt maltraité, on s'en conſole avec ſon amy ; ſi on eſt heureux, on redouble ſa joye en la diſant à vn [65] autre ſoy-meſme ; & puis quand il naiſt quelque petite querelle entre deux perſonnes qui s'aiment, il eſt tres-commode d'avoir vn arbitre ſecret & fidelle qui puiſſe la terminer. C'eſt encore l'vnique moyen de ne dépendre point ni de ſuivans ni de ſuivantes ; c'eſt vn grand plaiſir de pouvois parler des graces receuës ſans eſtre accuſé de vanité. Ce n'eſt pas qu'à regarder les choſes d'vne autre ſorte, on ne puſt dire que dans vne grande paſſion les confidens ſont quelquefois d'eſtranges gens. Les vns deviennent rivaux de leurs amis ; les autres ſont indiſcrets, ils ont eux-meſmes des maiſtreſſes à qui ils rediſent tout ce qu'ils ſçavent ; & j'ay veu vne fois vne avanture de galanterie aller de confident en confident, juſques à ce qu'elle fuſt ſceuë de [66] tout le monde ; le premier confident le dit à ſa maiſtreſſe qui avoit vne confidente qui le dit à ſon Amant, cét Amant le dit à vn autre confident, & ainſi du reſte. Enfin je ſuis perſuadé que c'eſt quelque ſorte d'indiſcretion & d'infidelité de confier les graces qu'on reçoit d'vne belle à qui que ce ſoit, du moins ſans ſa permiſſion. Le ſecret qui eſt le plus puiſſant charme de l'amour ne ſe trouve plus dés qu'on a vn confident ; il donne meſme quelquefois plus de chagrin que de conſolation ; car il ne s'intereſſe pas toûjours tendrement aux choſes ; à peine ſçait-il ce qu'on luy dit, on devient ſon eſclave au lieu d'eſtre ſon amy ; on craint qu'il ne parle, & peu à peu on ceſſe ſouvent d'avoir de l'amitié pour luy. Ce n'eſt pas que ce ne ſoit quelque- [67] fois vn grand avantage d'avoir vn amy qui puiſſe obſerver la maiſtreſſe quand l'Amant eſt abſent, & luy parler de luy ſelon les occaſions ; mais aprés tout quand la Dame ne penſe pas d'elle-meſme à l'Amant abſent, le confident ne ſert de guere à l'en faire ſouvenir ; c'eſt au cœur à faire cét office, & dans vne veritable paſſion il ne faut point de tierce perſonne. Cela eſt bon dans des amours qui ne ſont pas innocentes, ce ſont des agens & des mediateurs, & non pas des confidens. En cét endroit Artimas s'arreſta vn moment, parut penſif & avoir l'eſprit partagé ; aprés quoy il pourſuivit de cette ſorte. Ce n'eſt pas qu'il ne puiſſe y avoir vne confidence tres-honneſte, qui n'eſt en effet qu'vne ſimple confiance des plus ſecrets [68] ſentimens d'vn cœur, ce ne ſont pas de ces gens-là qui donnent les lettres, qui ſervent aux rendez-vous, & qui ſont de vrais agens d'amourettes ; mais enfin ſi vn confident ne ſert à rien qu'à écouter ce qu'on luy dit, c'eſt vn meuble fort inutile en galanterie ; il faut pourtant bien que cela ſoit bon à quelque choſe, puiſqu'on voit meſme que ceux qui n'ont point eu de confidens pendant que leur amour a duré s'en font pour conter leurs hiſtoires paſſées, & les plus honneſtes gens en vſent ainſi. Il me ſemble pourtant qu'il eſt encore plus honneſte de conter ce qui eſt, que de dire ce qui a eſté ; car dans le fort de la paſſion on peut eſtre forcé à parler par la douleur ou par la jalouſie, & meſme par vn excés de joye ; mais ceux qui content les hiſtoires [69] paſſées ne peuvent plus le faire que par vanité. Ie penſe toutefois qu'il eſt aſſez difficile de ſe taire eternellement, & qu'il faut ſeulement ſonger à bien choiſir les confidens & les confidentes. Mais non, je me deſdis, il ne les faut pas choiſir, il faut qu'ils ſe trouvent en quelque ſorte engagez dans l'avanture malgré nous, & que le hazard y ait ſa part. I'en reviens pourtant encore à dire, que le ſecret eſt vn grand charme en amour, & que ce n'est pas vn petit plaiſir, de penſer que nulle perſonne au monde ne ſçait ce qui ſe paſſe entre ce que nous aymons & nous ; que les ſentimens qui partent d'vn cœur ſe renferment dans vn autre ſans que rien d'eſtranger s'y meſle. Ce n'eſt pas que la confiance qu'on a en quelqu'vn ne renouvelle les [70] plaiſirs paſſez en les rediſant ; il y a meſme cette conſideration à faire, que dans toutes les autres choſes du monde on dit à quelqu'vn ce que l'on penſe. Cét eſchange de ſecrets eſt le commerce le plus vniverſel : comment donc pourroit-on s'en paſſer en amour où l'on a le plus de beſoin de conſeil & de conſolation qu'en nulle autre choſe ? Ie comprens pourtant qu'on peut dire que l'amour porte toûjours ſon conſeil avec luy, & qu'vn confident conſeille ſouvent tres-mal, car il parle ſelon ſon humeur, & n'entre pas dans celle de ſon amy. Il faut toutefois conſiderer que noſtre intereſt nous aveugle en tout, & à plus forte raiſon en vne paſſion qui aveugle tous ceux qu'elle poſſede, & qu'ainſi la raiſon n'eſt peut-eſtre [71] pas trop oppoſée à l'vſage d'avoir des confidens en amour. Ie ne voudrois pourtant pas, ſi je faiſois vne reforme en l'Empire amoureux, contraindre tous les Amans d'en avoir, & je voudrois laiſſer cela à la volonté des belles.

Ie n'euſſe pas crû, dit Plotine en riant, qu'on euſt pû aller au delà de ſon devoir ; cependant Artimas a bien eſté au delà du ſien. Ne vous amuſez point, dit Themiſte, à raiſonner là deſſus, belle Plotine, & voyez quel eſt le billet d'Herminius ; il l'ouvrit alors, & trouva que c'eſtoit à luy à ſouſtenir, qu'il ne faut point de confident en amour.

Ah, Themiſte, s'écria agreablement Herminius, je ſuis le plus heureux de toute la compagnie, puiſque ſans qu'il m'en couſte [72] vne parole je ſatisferay pleinement aux regles du jeu ; car enfin comme ſouvent dans les procés de la plus grande importance il eſt permis d'employer les raiſons de ſa partie contre elle-meſme, je croy qu'à plus forte raiſon je puis employer tout ce qu'Artimas a dit pour prouver qu'il faut vn confident en Amour. Car comme la grandeur de ſon eſprit eſt ce qui fait l'incertitude de ſa volonté, il a dit tout ce que j'euſſe pû dire de mieux, & qui ſepareroit toutes les raiſons qu'il a apportées ſur ce ſujet, trouveroit qu'il a ſatisfait aux deux billets que le ſort nous a donnex. Ie dis donc tout ce qu'il a dit, ne pouvant trouver autre choſe à dire, & quoy que peut-eſtre j'euſſe pû en imaginer moy-meſme vne partie, je ne laiſſe [73] pas de conſentir qu'Artimas ait toutes les loüanges qu'il euſt fallu nous partager. Tout le monde rit de ce qu'Herminius auoit dit ; & il paſſa à la pluralité des voix, qu'Artimas ayant épuiſé ce ſujet là, Herminius eſtoit bien fondé en ſa pretention. On fut meſme perſuadé qu'à deſſein il avoit voulu faire place aux billets qui venoient aprés le sien, & on luy donna cette loüange peu commune aux gens de beaucoup d'eſprit, que perſonne n'ayant plus de facilité que luy à parler, perſonne n'avoit pourtant plus de facilité à ſe taire & à laiſſer parler les autres. Pour moy, dit Artimas, qui entendoit bien raillerie, j'avouë que je ſuis tellement incertain, que je doute ſi ce qu'a dit Herminius m'eſt avantageux ou non, & doit paſſer pour [74] loüange ou pour blaſme. Nous deciderons cela à la fin du jeu, dit Themiſte en riant : Cependant, adjouſta-t-il, c'eſt à Meriandre à voir ce que le ſort luy a donné. Il déplia alors ſon billet, & y trouva ces mots, des vers d'Elegie.

Si le jeu, dit Meriandre, m'euſt engagé à vne Elegie toute entiere, j'euſſe eſté bien embaraſſé ; mais pour vn petit morceau d'Elegie j'en viendray peut-eſtre à bout : En ſuite il fut s'appuyer vn moment ſur vne feneſtre du coſté du jardin, & vint reciter les Vers qui ſuivent.

Importune raiſon vous m'avez dégagé;
Mais malgré vos conſeils mon ſort n'eſt point changé,
Ie penſois eſtre heureux, & je ſuis miſerable,
[75]
Sans amour en tous lieux la triſteſſe m'accable,
Ie cherche le plaiſir, & le plaiſir me fuit,
Tout ce qui me plaiſoit me déplaiſt & me nuit;
Ie n'ayme plus Iris, mais je me hais moy meſme;
Et pour me conſoler de ce malheur extrême,
Ie veux me rengager, je veux eſtre enflâmé;
Ie cherche vn jeune cœur qui n'ait jamais aymé,
Qui ſe laiſſant toucher à mes pleurs, à ma flâme,
Veuïlle eſtre pour toûjours le maiſtre de mon ame.
Importune raiſon, allez faire des loix,
Gouverner des Eſtats, & conſeiller des Rois,
Laiſſez-moy, laiſſez-moy ces chagrins pleins de charmes,
[76]
Ces plaiſirs qu'on ne ſent qu'en répandant des larmes,
Et ne vous meſlez plus de regner dans vn cœur,
Qui ne veut plus avoir que l'amour pour vainqueur.

Malgré les regles du jeu, dit Noromate aprés que Meriandre eut recité ces Vers, je ne puis m'empeſcher de dire qu'il y a de la nouveauté à faire des Vers qui ont vn caractere aſſez tendre, quoy que celuy qui les a faits n'euſt plus d'amour. Ce que vous dites eſt bien remarqué, dit Themiſte ; mais vous m'empeſchez de le dire quand je ſeray obligé de juger. Cependant, adjouſta-t-il en me regardant, voyez ce que le hazard vous donne. Ie regarday donc alors mon billet, & je vis que c'eſtoit à moy à faire vne belle [77] maiſon de campagne : comme j'ayme fort l'architecture, les jardins & les fontaines, je n'en fus pas faſchée ; Voicy à peu prés ce que je dis.

Ie voy bien que ſelon les regles du jeu je ſuis condamnée à faire la deſcription d'vne belle maiſon de campagne ſelon ma fantaiſie ; mais comme il me ſemble que l'imagination eſt plus agreablement remplie de ce qui eſt, que de ce qui peut eſtre, je parleray à toute la compagnie comme ſi j'avois veû effectivement en quelque part tout ce que je décriray. Ie croy meſme avoir veû vn livre ſur la table d'vn de mes amis, qui s'appelle le Songe de Polyphile, dont l'Auteur, ſi ma memoire ne me trompe, ne laiſſe pas de parler comme s'il avoit veû effectivement tout ce qu'il [78] décrit, quoy qu'il n'ait eû deſſein que de donner vne idée de la belle Architecture : du moins remarquay-je cela en deux ou trois pages que j'en leu ; car je ne ſuis pas aſſez bel eſprit pour lire de ces ſortes de livres d'vn bout à l'autre. Ie diray donc qu'environ à deux lieuës de la premiere Ville du monde, aprés avoir paſſé vn bois tres-agreable, on trouve vn pont aſſez ruſtique qui traverſe vne tres belle & tres-fameuſe riviere, au delà de laquelle on monte par vn chemin qui ne promet pas ce que l'on doit trouver ; on arrive meſme à la porte du Palais ſans en rien découvrir, car elle cache encore fort modeſtement toutes les beautez qu'elle enferme ; la face du baſtiment qu'on voit en entrant, n'a pas d'abord cét air ſurprenant qui [79] fait qu'on eſt eſtonné de ce qu'on voit, elle eſt ſeulement reguliere ſelon ſa diſpoſition ; la cour qui eſt en terraſſe eſt d'vne grandeur raiſonnable ; il y a vne niche à l'oppoſite du veſtibule qui peut ſervir à mettre des oiſeaux ; elle a vne figure ruſtique au milieu, & des baſſes tailles des deux coſtez ; mais on voit à la gauche de la cour en entrant vne baluſtrade, au de là de laquelle on découvre tout d'vn coup vne eſtenduë de veuë ſi merveilleuſe, qu'excepté la mer, tous les beaux objets du monde ſont expoſez aux yeux de ceux qui s'y appuyent pour reſver agreablement. Cependant comme cette veuë eſt encore plus belle d'vn autre endroit dont je vous parleray, je ne veux pas m'y arreſter, & je veux vous conduire dans le Palais par vn ve- [80] ſtibule orné au dehors de quelques baſſes tailles : Cét endroit a quelque choſe de ſingulier, car on peut dire que ce veſtibule eſt double, il penetre tout le corps du baſtiment, la moitié ſert de paſſage pour aller gagner l'eſcalier à la gauche qui eſt tres-beau & tres-clair, & l'autre moitié eſt proprement vn veſtibule en eſcalier employé pour deſcendre au jardin par des marches des deux coſtez, à plusieurs repos. Mais ce qu'il y a de plus particulier, c'est qu'aprés avoir veû dans la cour cette belle & grande veuë au delà de la baluſtrade, on voit dés le premier pas qu'on fait en entrant au veſtibule vne veuë bornée par de grands arbres qui font vn effet admirable. Car ce veſtibule en eſcalier eſt ouvert de part tout de coſté du jardin ; [81] le bas a vne baluſtrade de fer, & les ouvertures du haut ont vne figure de chaque coſté. De ce lieu là, en baiſſant les yeux, on trouve vn grand parterre bordé de grands arbres qui ſemblent aller jusqu'au Ciel, qu'on ne voit pas de cét endroit ; & l'on découvre auſſi vn rondeau avec vn jet au milieu ; en ſuite on monte le bel eſcalier dont j'ay parlé, & l'on entre dans vn grand & magnifique ſallon qui fait oublier tout ce qu'on a veû & en ce lieu-là & ailleurs, tant il eſt ſurprenant, & occupe agreablement les yeux ; & l'on peut dire que tout ce que l'art & la nature peuvent faire voir de plus beau, ſe voit en ce ſuperbe ſallon. Il eſt grand & ſpacieux, ſon élevation eſt proportionnée à ſa grandeur, & la forme eſt tres-belle : il y a au bout, du [82] coſté de la grande & belle veuë, trois grandes croiſées en arcade ouvertes de haut en bas, & quatre à la main droite qui ont des veuës differentes ; on a meſme placé vis-à-vis des croiſées de miroirs qui redoublent la veuë de la campagne, & qui font que cét admirable ſallon ſemble eſtre entierement ouvert de trois faces. Tout le dome eſt peint & doré, & a vn grand air de magnificence. Les peintures en ſont tres-belles & d'vn coloris fort noble. Le Peintre a repreſenté l'alliance de deux Maiſons Royales. Les deux Nations ſont representées par deux figures de femmes que l'Amour couronne, & vers le haut du tableau paroiſſent les portraits d'vn grand Prince & d'vne belle Princeſſe, ſouſtenus par les Heures. On y voit auſſi la [83] Renommée, & pluſieurs petits Amours qui chaſſent le deſordre & la diſcorde ; mais on les prendroit preſque pour des enfans de la Renommée, car ils ont tous de petites trompettes à la main, & dans des banderoles les armes des deux Nations, dont l'alliance ſe fait. On voit encore au haut de la cheminée le portrait d'vn jeune Prince qui tient vne couronne de laurier, & d'vne jeune Princeſſe, qui ſeront vn jour le plus grand ornement du monde : & l'on voir auſſi tout à l'entour de ce magnifique ſallon dans des quadres dorez, de grandeurs differentes, mais rangez en ordre, entre les croiſées les portraits de pluſieurs grands Princes & grandes Princeſſes des principales Couronnes de l'Europe ; de ſorte que de partout on ne [84] découvre que de beaux objets. Mais aprés avoir regardé tous ces portraits, dont la deſcription ſeroit trop longue, & où l'or des friſes & des corniches ſe meſle & éclate agreablement entre les peintures, on va au bout du ſallon, dont les grandes croiſées ſont ouvertes, & l'on entre ſur vn corridor à baluſtrade qui regne tout à l'entour du baſtiment, d'où l'on découvre la plus belle veuë qui puiſſe tomber ſous les yeux. C'eſt en cét endroit qu'il faut que l'art cede à la nature, & qu'on eſt ſi ſurpris & ſi charmé, que les paroles manquent pour exprimer ce que l'on voit. Cette veuë n'eſt ni trop vaſte ni trop bornée ; elle a des objets en toute ſorte de diſtance, les yeux ſont occupez & divertis ſans ſe laiſſer, la diverſité [85] fait que cette veuë a toûjours de la nouveauté pour ceux meſme qui en jouyſſent le plus ſouvent, & l'on y remarque toûjours quelque choſe qu'on n'y avoit pas encore apperceuë. On voit ſous ſes pieds vn grand parterre en terraſſe partagé en deux, vn agreable canal bordé de gaſon & couvert de Cygnes, avec vne allée baſſe qui regne tout à l'entour, & des orangers qui la forment. Ce parterre en terraſſe eſt bordé d'agreables vaſes remplis de mirthes fleuris : le canal a deux jets d'eau qui le rendent encore plus agreable ; à la gauche pardeſſus vne touffe d'arbres qui ſemblent n'oſer s'élever en cét endroit de peur de dérober la veuë, paroiſt le pont ruſtique dont j'ay déja parlé, & plus loin vn village qui orne le [86] païſage, principalement parce qu'il a derriere luy vn grand & agreable bois qui par cette oppoſition fait vn objet plus aimable, & pardeſſus ce bois en éloignement paroiſt vne montagne couronnée de baſtimens. On voit auſſi aſſez loin à la gauche vn Chaſteau dont l'architecture aſſez antique ne laiſſe pas d'embellir cét endroit ; & on voit meſme dans vne touffe d'arbres qui eſt au delà du canal vn petit dome tirant ſur la droite qui ſemble s'y cacher, & qui adjouſte pourtant quelque choſe d'agreable à ce lieu là ; & pardeſſus les arbres on voit des prairies & des ſaules qui laiſſent paroiſtre la riviere à travers leurs feuïlles menuës, on diroit qu'elle ſerpente en cét endroit pour en eſtre plus belle, comme ſi elle avoit [87] peur d'eſtre priſe pour vn canal, & aprés avoir fait vn deſtour à la droite, elle ſe cache & s'enfuit entre les montagnes. On découvre meſme de ce lieu-là pardeſſus mille objets ſurprenans qui s'effacent peu à peu en s'éloignant, la premiere ville du monde, qui par ſa propre grandeur ne laiſſe pas de ſe faire remarquer malgré l'éloignement, & l'on diſcerne aiſément en vn beau jour les belles & longues galleries du Palais d'vn grand Roy. On voit enfin des montagnes au delà de cette ſuperbe Ville, qui ſemblent s'vnir avec le Ciel, & donner vne borne ſans bornes à cet admirable païſage. Mais pour divertir la veuë on apperçoit à la droite au delà des arbres, certains tertres rustiques & ſauvages qui font que les autres ob- [88] jets en ſemblent plus beaux ; la riviere qui fait vn détour du meſme coſté embellit extrémement tout cét endroit, & mille choſse confuſes & differentes qui ſe meſlent parmy celles qu'on peut diſcerner rendent cette veuë grande, noble & charmante. Les quatre croiſées qui ſont le long du ſallon ont vne veuë differente qui a quelque choſe de plus propre à la melancholie, mais qui ne laiſſe pas de plaire. On voit de là vn parterre, vn jet d'eau au milieu, & au delà vn bois épais & touffu qui ſemble promettre vne foreſt derriere luy. La meſme riviere dont j'ay parlé ſe montre encore par vn petit retour, qu'on ne voit que de là, afin que la varieté divertiſſe davantage. Mais enfin on ſe force à ſortir de ce ſuperbe [89] ſallon pour entrer dans vne chambre magnifique, où l'on voit ſur la cheminée le portrait d'vn Roy de qui le ſurnom de Grand l'a diſtingué de tous les autres Rois, qui l'ont precedé ; & l'on voit dans la meſme chambre ſix portraits de ſa famille Royale la premiere du monde, qui ſont parfaitement reſſemblans. Pour le dome on y a repreſenté les quatre Saiſons, & les quatre Elemens enſemble ; c'eſt à dire qu'à chaque coſté il y a vn Element & vne Saiſon. On paſſe encore dans vne autre chambre qui mene au cabinet des bains, qui eſt tres beau & tres-agreable. On voit au platfons Flore repreſentée, & ſur la cheminée le portrait d'vne belle Princeſſe qui efface la Deeſſe dont je parle ; & à l'entour dans des ova- [90] les les portraits des premieres perſonnes de la terre. Ce cabinet a auſſi des miroirs pour redoubler la veuë ; & dans vn enfoncement qui ſemble d'abord vne alcove, eſt la place des bains où l'on voit de petites niches avec des figures qui tiennent des vaſes d'où l'eau ſemble ſortir : Enfin cét appartement eſt tres-beau & tres-magnifique, il y a auſſi en bas vn lieu deſtiné pour la Comedie. Mais il eſt temps de vous mener à la promenade, & de vous faire deſcendre dans le jardin par cét eſcalier en veſtibule dont j'ay déja parlé. Quand on y eſt, & qu'on ſe retourne pour voir le baſtiment, la face en eſt plus belle que de nul autre lieu, & cét eſcalier du milieu & le corridor à baluſtrade qui regne tout à l'entour font vn objet [91] qui plaiſt : mais enfin au delà du parterre on perd la belle veuë, & l'on trouve vn petit canal ſolitaire bien different du premier. Il y a vn jet d'eau au milieu, & vn bois fort épais au delà qui porte aiſément à la reſverie : cette eau paroiſt ſombre comme la melancholie qu'elle inſpire : on deſcend en ſuite par vn eſcalier aſſez ruſtique, ayant à la gauche ce petit canal dont j'ay parlé, & à la droite vne petite allée baſſe aſſez eſtroite, fraiſche & agreable, avec vn ruiſſeau qui paſſe tout du long au milieu, & vne petite grotte ſauvage & ſolitaire au bout extrémement propre à laiſſer paſſer la grande chaleur des plus longs jours de l'Eſté. A coſté de celle-là regne vne allée haute & auſſi ſombre ; & en avançant vn peu da- [92] vantage, on en voit vne plus petite qui a vne agreable fontaine au bout, & qui eſt tres-propre à reſver, ſans vouloir eſtre interrompu. En ſuite on van en vn carrefour champeſtre, où l'on trouve trois petites allées qui vont en baiſſant, entre de grands arbres, juſques à trois fontaines avec des baſſins ruſtiques ; & au delà ces meſmes allées continuent en s'élevant, ce qui fait vne veuë bornée de partout, qui ne laiſſeroit pas de plaire à vn Amant qui auroit quelque joye ou quelque douleur à cacher. En ſuite on va par vn chemin tres-agreable voir vne grotte, au devant de laquelle eſt vn gros boüillon d'eau, dont le murmure commence de marquer l'abondance qu'il y en a en ce lieu-là. On voit à la droite vne [93] allée avec vn jet d'eau, & à la gauche cette meſme allée qui continuë ; & au delà d'vne fontaine vne perſpective qui laiſſe entrevoir vne petite Nymphe qui ſemble n'avoir encore le cœur occupé que d'vn petit chien qu'elle ayme, & qui eſt repreſenté au meſme lieu. On entre en ſuite dans cette grotte où l'on rencontre tout ce qui peut amuſer les yeux, & tout ce que l'art qui s'eſt rendu le tyran des eaux les plus libres a inventé de plus joly. Mais comme j'ay en ſuite à parler de plus grandes beautez, je ne m'y arreſteray pas ; car il y a autant de difference entre les agreables grottes & les magnifiques caſcades, qu'on en voit entre ces jolies bagatelles & ces petits ſervices d'argent dont on amuſe les enfans [94] de qualité, & ces grands & magnifiques baſſins, avec leurs vaſes & leurs civieres que tout le monde a eſté admirer aux Manufactures royales ſous la conduite du Brun. Au ſortir de la grotte, il faut paſſer aſſez prés du haut d'vne admirable caſcade, qu'on ne peut s'empeſcher de regarder : Mais comme cét amas de belles choſes ne ſe doit pas voir de là, je vous diray qu'en allant d'vn bel endroit à vn autre, on trouve par tout des allées differentes ; qu'on découvre tantoſt des baluſtrades, tantoſt des palliſſades ; & qu'enfin deſcendant entre de grands arbres qui ſemblent toucher les nuës, on arrive à vn grand quarré d'eau qui eſt vne des plus belles choſes qu'on puiſſe voir. Il eſt d'vne grandeur qui a de la magnificence, il eſt reveſtu d'vne baluſtra- [95] de du coſté du bois qui va en montant ; & du coſté de cette baluſtrade juſtement au milieu & ſous les plus beaux arbres du monde, paroiſt vn grand rocher d'eau qui par divers gros boüillons reguliers & tumultueux fait vn objet admirable ; deux fontaines dont les jets vont en arcade, accompagnent cette roche de criſtal mobile, s'il eſt permis de parler ainſi, & pluſieurs mufles au deſſous de la baluſtrade jettent l'eau par gros boüillons dans ce grand quarré que je viens de deſcrire. Mais tout cela n'eſt rien en comparaiſon d'vn grand & gros jet d'eau qui eſt au milieu, car il part avec vne impetuoſité ſi grande que la rapidité des fuſées ne peut tout au plus que l'égaler en vîteſſe, ſans le ſurpaſſer en hauteur : [96] En effet il s'élance avec vn bruit qui marque ſa force, & paſſant au deſſus des plus hauts arbres ſemble ne devoir s'arreſter que dans le Ciel, & les yeux y ſeroient ſans doute trompez, ſi l'on ne voyoit enfin que groſſiſſant & s'éparpillant en s'élevant, il retombe en ſuite comme vne pluye d'orage qui trouble toute la tranquilité du quarré d'eau, & dont le bruit murmurant chaſſe agreablement le ſilence d'vn ſi beau lieu. On ne prend point garde durant cela qu'à l'oppoſite de ce quarré d'eau il y a vne veuë ruſtique fort agreable, ni qu'il y a des endroits ſauvages tout à l'entour qui en redoublent la beauté, & à peine s'apperçoit-on qu'à droit & à gauche on voit vne grande & belle allée qui a des niches d'ar- [97] chitecture en vn bout. Mais enfin on vous force de quitter ce bel endroit pour aller le long de cette allée qui conduit à la caſcade. Quand on y eſt arrivé, on eſt charmé par la beauté de ce magnifique & surprenant objet, & l'on peut dire que ſi les rivieres ont leur lit naturel, l'Art a pris plaiſir d'en faire vn tres-ſuperbe à ces torrens reguliers qui ſe precipitent les vns aprés les autres ſur cette belle montagne d'architecture, s'il m'eſt permis de parler ainſi : car au contraire des fleuves qui ont leur lit dans des valées, il faut que les caſcades ayent les leurs dans des lieux élevez. On voit donc au haut de celle dont je parle vne baluſtrade dorée, au milieu paroiſſent des armes les plus illuſtres du monde portées [98] par deux fleuves & ſouſtenuës par vn Dauphin à teſte dorée ; & à droit & à gauche des fleuves on voit deux figures de chaque coſté qui ornent cét endroit, & qui ſont encore accompagnées de quelques autres : les fleuves ont des vaſes auprés d'eux d'où ſort vne quantité d'eau prodigieuſe : Le Dauphin en jette auſſi vne abondance extréme, & à droit & à gauche de ces grandes napes d'eau ſont deux longs rangs de chandeliers à gros boüillons, & à jets entremeſlez de gaſon, & d'vne agreable rigole ; & plus bas deux autres rangs de jets & de boüillons plus petits, meſlez encore avec de la verdure. Mais entre tous ces chandeliers, ces boüillons & ces jets de grandeur different paroiſſent encore des mu- [99] fles dorez qui jettent de l'eau ; & vers le haut, outre ces rangs élevez de tant de boüillons d'eau, on voit deux autres Dauphins ſouſtenant des figures qui jettent auſſi de l'eau abondamment, & parmy tout cela vn grand nombre de boules dorées repreſentant des bombes, & ſervant de corps à vne tres-belle & tres-ingenieuſe deviſe [Alter poſt fulmina terror] qui a eſté faite par vn homme de beaucoup de merite pour vn tres-grand Prince. Mais tout ce qu'on peut dire ne peut repreſenter ces grandes napes d'eau, ces jets, ces boüillons, ces rigoles, ces ruiſſeaux, ces torrens qui ſe precipitent à l'envy l'vn de l'autre, & qui contribuent tous selon leur pouvoir à enchâſſer dans du cristal liquide cette belle montagne d'architecture. En vn [100] endroit les eaux jaliſſent, en l'autre elles coulent & s'étendent : en vn lieu elles ſe precipitent, en l'autre elles ne font que gliſſer ; & cét element qui n'a preſque point de couleur naturelle en prend là pluſieurs d'eſpace en eſpace pour le plaiſir des yeux. Car les gros boüillons d'eau blachiſſent comme la nege, les rigoles prennent la couleur du gaſon, l'eau qui s'épanche ſur les chandeliers & ſur les mufles, fait des flots dorez comme le ſont ceux du Pactole, & toutes ces eaux enſemble, par tout les meſmes & par tout differentes, ſe répandent avec tant de force, & tant d'abondance, que quand elles auroient la mer pour reſervoit elles ne pourroient paroiſtre avec plus de prodigalité. Mais enfin elles ſe déchargent dans vn grand [101] baſſin qui a pluſieurs jets d'eau & pluſieurs mufles dorez qui ſe déchargent auſſi dans des coquilles à double rang ; & c'eſt preciſement à droit & à gauche qu'on voit cette belle deviſe dont j'ay déja parlé. Pour accompagner cette magnifique caſcade, au delà de ce baſſin que je viens de décrire qui a des deux coſtez les figures des quatre vents, & quelques autres, ſont deux Dragons qui jettent auſſi de l'eau, & vne belle allée gaſonnée par le milieu, & de chaque coſté elle a des jets d'eau en forme de baluſtrade de criſtal qui retombent dans de petits baſſins liez par vn agreables ruiſſeau qui murmure & qui coule entre du gaſon : & plus loin eſt encore vn rondeau, avec un beau jet au milieu, au delà du- [102] quel eſt vne allée conduiſant juſqu'à vne baluſtrade qui donne ſur le bord de la riviere. Le païſage, à droit & à gauche, eſt tres-beau ; mais on ne peut le voit que la caſcade ne ceſſe d'aller, encore eſt-ce tout ce qu'on peut faire que de ceſſer alors de regarder ſon magnifique lit, ou pour mieux dire ſon ſuperbe trône qui la fait regner ſur tous les beaux lieux d'alentour. Mais enfin pour achever la deſcription que je ſuis obligée de faire, quand on eſt las d'admirer vne ſi belle choſe, on tourne à droit, & l'on voit vn coſtau ruſtique borner agreablement la veuë pour la délaſſer des grands objets qui l'ont occupée. On voit auſſi de grands arbres dont l'ombrage plaiſt extrémement : On voit en ſuite vne [103] porte grillée, vne allée qui va juſqu'à vne baluſtrade, & de ce lieu-là le grand jet qui eſt au milieu du quarré d'eau eſt admirable. On voit encore vn beau verger en paſſant : on tourne à droit dans vne allée d'où l'on en découvre pluſieurs autres, & de grands compartimens de gaſon à gauche, entremeſlez de petits canaux & de petits quarrez d'eau, avec des jets d'eau en arcade qui font vn objet merveilleux : car tout cela eſt bordé de verdure, & les allées qui forment les compartimens ſont ſablées ; mais cette ſimplicité qui a vn air champeſtre, a pourtant quelque choſe de grand & de noble qui plaiſt infiniment. On arrive enfin à vn endroit où il y a vn rondeau à treize jets d'vne égale hauteur rangez avec ordre ; [104] il est au milieu de huit allées dont l'on voit également cét agreable objet, & toutes les veuës de ces huit allées ſont differentes. De l'vne on voit vn coſtau de vignes, & nulle habitation ; & d'vne autre vne partie du baſtiment & vne allée haute qui couronne ces montagnes : à la gauche vn petit bois en forme de labyrinthe ; & en avançant on voit vn autre jardin qu'on acheve. Il eſt fermé d'vn coſté par vn berceau de chevrefeuïl & de jaſmin : les trois autres faces ſont des paliſſades de chevrefeuïl, avec des portiques de cyprés ornez auſſi de chevrefeuïl ſur le haut. Ce jardin eſt encore par grands tapis de gaſon, avec vn rondeau au milieu, ayant à la droite le long de la montagne vne allée plus haute, [105] & au deſſus encore vn canal en terraſſe de plus de cinquante toiſes de long bordé de gaſon. Il y auroit encore cent autres belles choſes à décrire, ſi je ne craignois que ma deſcription ne fuſt trouvée trop longue ; c'eſt pourquoy je me contenteray de prier celuy qui doit eſtre mon juge de repaſſer dans ſon imagination la beauté de ſallon, de la belle veué, des jardins differens, des bois, des fontaines, des canaux, des allées, du quarré d'eau, de ce jet merveilleux qui va preſque attaquer le Soleit, & de cette caſcade admirable où l'Art fait vne ſi douce violence à la Nature, où les fontaines deviennent torrens, où les torrens ſe changent en paiſibles rondeaux, & où l'on voit enfin ce qu'on ne peut [106] meſme voir en la ſuperbe Italie, ni en nul autre lieu du monde, puiſqu'il eſt vray que depuis que les hommes ont trouvé l'art de tyranniſer les eaux & de les aſſujettir à ſuivre leur volonté, on ne les a jamais employées ni avec tant de magnificence, ni avec tant de beauté.

Toute la compagnie commençant alors de vouloir louër la deſcription de cette belle maiſon, je l'interrompis. Vous croyez peut-eſtre, adjouſtay-je, que je ſuis à la fin de mon diſcours ; mais il faut pourtant que je vous diſe vne fantaiſie que j'ay : C'eſt que je ne puis ſouffrir qu'vne belle maiſon n'ait pas vn maiſtre digne d'elle, & je me ſouviens d'avoir eſté en de fort beaux lieux qui m'eſtoient inſupportab- [107] bles ; parce que ceux à qui ils appartenoient n'eſtoient pas aſſez honneſtes gens pour les meriter & pour les remplir. Il n'en eſt pas de meſme du Palais enchanté dont je viens de vous parler, je pretends qu'il appartient à vn grand & aymable Prince, & à une belle & charmante Princeſſe, en qui on trouve tout ce qui attire du reſpect, de l'admiration, du zele & de la tendreſſe. Ces quatre ſentimens naiſſent dans les cœurs dés qu'on les voit. Ces deux perſonnes ſont faites pour les delices des yeux & pour la felicité de l'esprit. Leur naiſſance royale eſt la moindre de leurs grandes qualitez : on la compte pourtant pour beaucoup, parce que par leur maniere obligeante, douce & pleine d'huma- [108] nité envers ceux qui les approchent, on voit qu'ils ne la comptent pas eux-meſmes pour ſe diſpenſer d'avoir de la bonté parmy leurs inferieurs, & qu'ils veulent bien qu'on prefere leur merite à leur condition. Le Prince qui a fait faire cette merveilleuſe caſcade eſt, comme je l'ay déja dit, d'vne naiſſance qui ne voit rien au deſſus d'elle : Il eſt beau, bien fait, & de bonne grace : il a les cheveux du plus beau noir du monde ; les yeux vifs, brillans, pleins d'eſprit, de courage, de bonté & de tendreſſe ; la bouche tres-belle, le ſouſ rire agreable & charmant, le nez bien fait, le viſage d'vne forme qui donne de l'agrément, & vn certain air de grandeur meſlé de charmes & d'humanité qui ravit, & qui luy donne vne phyſionomie [109] heureuſe & ſpirituelle capable de plaire infiniment. Il a la taille tres-bien faite, les jambes belles, l'air fort libre ; & je conçois enfin qu'vn grand peintre en imitant le viſage de ce Prince, pourroit repreſenter vn Dieu aſſez beau pour donner meſme de la jalouſie aux Deeſſes. Il a de plus cét art de s'habiller galamment, qui eſt ſceu de ſi peu de perſonnes, & qui adjouſte pourtant beaucoup à la beauté & à la bonne mine : Et je me ſouviens d'vn jour entre les autres qu'il avoit vne veſte de brocard d'or, à fond brun, en broderie de perles, dont les boutons eſtoient de gros diamans, & que tout le monde loüa & admira ſa magnificence. Mais ce qui le rend digne de toutes les loüanges imaginables, c'eſt qu'il a l'eſprit & le [110] cœur proportionnez à ſa naiſſance & aux charmes de ſa perſonne. Il eſt toûjours grand & toûjours civil, & par cent manieres qu'on ne peut exprimer, il attache les cœurs de ceux qui l'approchent : Il parle fort juſte & fort agreablement, & cette charmante familiarité qui s'accommode ſi bien avec le reſpect qu'on doit à la personne d'vn grand Prince, ſe trouve éminemment en luy. Il ayme tout ce qu'il doit aymer : Il veut bien avoir des amis, & les aymer ſans changement. Il eſt ſecret quand il le faut eſtre : il protege les ſiens avec plaiſir, leur rend juſtice meſme contre ſes propres intereſts ; ayme à faire du bien à tout le monde, & teſmoigne enfin par cent choſes differentes, qu'il eſt capable de tout [111] ce qui peut faire vn grand & excellent Prince, ſoit dans la paix, ſoit dans la guerre. Pour la belle Princeſſe qui partage ſa fortune avec luy, je n'oſe penſer à la peindre, ſçachant qu'on en a fait vne peinture qui luy reſſemble beaucoup mieux, que celle que je mettrois icy ne pourroit luy reſſembler. Ie me contenteray donc ſeulement de dire vn Madrigal qu'on a deſſein de mettreſous vn de ſes portraits. Le voicy:

Cét air ſi delicat, ce regard enchanté,
Ce teint qui peut ternir & les lys & les roses,
Cét amas ſurprenant de tant de belles choſses,
Repreſente à vos yeux la parfaite beauté :
[112]
Mais ce brillant eſprit ſi remply de juſteſſe,
A nos eſprits charmez en fait vne Deeſſe;
Auſſi-toſt qu'on la voit, il la faut admirer,
Auſſi-toſt qu'elle parle, il la faut adorer.

I'adjouſteray ſeulement à cela, que cette divine Princeſſe eſt mille fois au deſſus de tout ce qu'on en peut dire, & que quelques louanges qu'on luy ait entendu donner avant que de l'avoir veuë, on eſt toûjours ſurpris de ſon éclat & de ſon merite. Il eſt aiſé de juger qu'vn Prince & vne Princeſſe tels que je viens de les repreſenter, ont vne Cour nombreuſe, galante & agreable : ils ayment tous deux les perſonnes de merite, & les diſtinguent obli- [113] geamment ; ils ont tout ce qui attire les cœurs & tout ce qui les conſerve. On voit de la foule ſans confuſion alentour d'eux : Tout le monde paroiſt content quand on les approche : la joye ſe répand parmy tous ceux qui leur font leur Cour ; & quand ils font vne feſte dans le beau Palais que je vous ay décrit, rien n'eſt mieux entendu, plus galant, plus propre, ni plus magnifique. Les jeux, les plaiſirs, les amours ſe trouvent dans toutes les allées & au bord de toutes les fontaines : Le Prince eſt accompagné de tout ce qu'il y a de grand : la Princeſſe a des filles dont la beauté peut tout aſſujettir ; & de tant de perſonnes accomplies, il ſe forme vne Cour charmante & qgreable, où tout plaiſt, & où rien [114] n'importune. On croiroit en ce lieu-là que ceux qui dans tous les ſiecles & parmy toutes les nations ont tant décrié les Cours des Princes, comme eſtant remplies de fourbes, d'ingrats, d'ambitieux, de médiſans & de calomniateurs : on croiroit, diſ-je, qu'ils n'on ſceu ce qu'ils diſoient : car en celle cy il ſemble que l'eſtime, l'admiration & la joye font qu'on ne penſe qu'à plaire, & qu'à eſtre ſouffert agreablement ; & le plaiſir qu'il y a d'aymer la Maiſtre & la Maiſtreſſe pourroit même ſuſpendre la haine, l'envie, & toutes les autres mauvaiſes paſſions. Enfin, s'il eſt permis de parler de cette ſorte, on les ſuit ſans s'en pouvoir empeſcher, & l'on ſe ſent attirer par vne douce violence telle qu'on dit qu'eſtoit [115] celle de cette charmante harmonie qui ſe faiſoit ſuivre par les bois & par les rochers. C'eſt à vous, diſ-je alors à la belle Melancolique, à faire ce que voſtre billet & la loy du jeu vous impoſe : car je n'oſe parler plus long-temps, quoy que j'euſſe encore mille choſes à dire des illuſtres perſonnes qui font non seulement le plus grand ornement du Palais que j'ay décrit, mais vn des plus grands ornemens du monde. Ie n'aurois jamais creû, me dit Themiſte, que vous euſſiez pû faire vne deſcription comme celle-là. Pour moy, adjouſta Plotine en m'aadreſſant la parole, je m'attendois que pour vous acquiter promptement vous nous baſtiriez vne petite maiſon, & cepen- [116] dant au lieu de cela vous nous faites vn Palais, vn Heros, & vne Heroïne. Ah ! m'écriay-je en l'interrompant, il faut que je ſois vn méchant peintre : car je voy bien que vous m'allez obliger à faire comme on faiſoit pendant l'enfance de la Peinture, où l'on mettoit le nom de ce qu'on repreſentoit, parce qu'on l'avoit mal repreſenté. Ie ſçavois bien, pourſuivis-je, que je déroberois beaucoup à tout ce que je décrivois, & que les Originaux eſtoient plus beaux que les copies : mais je n'euſſe pourtant jamais creû eſtre contrainte de vous dire que j'ay décrit ſaint Cloud, que mon Heros eſt Monſieur, & que mon Heroïne eſt Madame. A peine eus-je dit cela, que toute la compagnie me demanda par- [117] don de la ſtupidité ; & quoy que ce ſoit la couſtume de flater ceux qui ont décrit quelque choſe, tout le monde demeura d'accord que j'avois raiſon, & que ma deſcription eſtoit beaucoup au deſſous de la verité. Pour moy, dit Herminius, je ne comprens pas que nous ayons pû écouter tout cela comme vn Roman ; c'eſt ſans doute le plaiſir qui a ſuſpendu ma raiſon : car cette belle deviſe de la bombe, qu'vn de mes amis, dont le nom & le merite ſont ſi connus, a donnée à Monſieur, eſt dans ma memoire depuis qu'il la donna & qu'elle fut trouvée ſi judicieuſe, ſi belle & ſi convenable à l'illuſtre Frere d'vn grand Roy. Le moyen, dit Philiſte, d'avoir ſeulement entendu parler de la caſcade & ne la re- [118] connoiſtre pas ? & le moyen encore d'avoir veû ſeulement vne fois le Prince & la Princeſſe ſans reconnoiſtre ? nous avions aſſurément tous perdu l'eſprit. Pour moy, dit Artimas, j'y ay penſé plus d'vne fois, mais doutant de ma penſée je ne la diſois pas. En ſuite on pria Noromate de voir quel eſtoit ſon billet, & l'on trouva que c'eſtoit à elle à raconter vne hiſtoire : mais bien loin d'en paroiſtre embaraſſée, elle témoigna en eſtre bien aiſe. Il paroiſt tant de joye dans vos yeux, luy dit Plotine, qu'il faut aſſurément que vous ayez vne hiſtoire toute faite dans la teſte : car pour moy je ſerois au deſeſpoir ſi le hazard m'avoit impoſé la neceſſité d'en raconter vne. Ie ſuis encore plus heureu- [119] ſe que vous ne penſez, repliqua Noromate avec vn ſoûris charmant : car cette hiſtoire n'eſt pas ſeulement dans ma teſte, elle eſt dans vn papier qu'vn de mes amis m'a donné ce matin : & comme elle n'eſt pas publiée, & que la perſonne qui l'a faite a deſſein de la donner aux illuſtres Maiſtres du Palais qu'on nous a décrit, je croy ſatisfaire aux regles du jeu en m'offrant de la lire à la compagnie. Tout le monde demeura d'accord de ce qu'elle diſoit : mais comme nous en eſtions là, & qu'on ſe preparoit à entendre ce que la belle Noromate avoit à lire, on entendit des tymbales : on envoya ſçavoir ce que c'eſtoit, & l'on ſceut que c'eſtoit Monſieur, & Madame qui s'en alloient à ſaint Cloud [120] où ils donnoient vne de ces agreables feſtes dont je venois de parler. On nous dit que toutes les allées ſeroient éclairées de chandeliers de criſtal, qu'il y auroit vn feu d'artifice, & que par vn meſlange de fuſées & de jets d'eau ces deux Elemens diſputeroient enſemble à qui divertiroit le mieux vne ſi charmante Cour : de ſorte que remettant le reſte du jeu au lendemain, nous reſoluſmes d'aller voir cette belle feſte, & de revenir coucher en ce lieu-là, où la maiſtreſſe de la maiſon avoit de quoy recevoir tres-commodement toute la compagnie dans des appartemens tres-propres. Vn moment aprés nous ſceuſmes que le Prince & la Princeſſe avoient ordonné qu'on laiſſaſt entrer dans les jar- [121] dins toutes les perſonnes de qualité. Ainſi nous fiſmes collation, & nous fuſmes admirer de plus prés tout ce que j'avois décrit : & j'eus, ſi je l'oſe dire, la confuſion & la joye de voir que tout ce que j'avois loüé eſtoit beaucoup au deſſus de mes loüanges. Mais comme le plus grand charme de tous les plaiſirs eſt la liberté d'en changer quand la fantaiſie en prend, nous n'achevaſmes point noſtre jeu le lendemain. Nous paſſaſmes pourtant le jour à lire l'hiſtoire que la belle Melancolique avoit apportée, qui nous parut fort divertiſſante ; mais perſonne ne voulut que le Maiſtre du jeu prononçaſt, comme on l'avoit reſolu au commencement. Ainſi ſans que perſonne euſt vaincu nous revinſmes à Pa- [122] ris en nous entretenant encore avec plus de plaiſir des charmantes qualitez de Monſieur & de Madame, que des avantures de Mathilde.

FIN

Modernized Original

[1]

LES JEUX

SERVANT DE PREFACE

A MATHILDE

Nous partîmes de Paris à deux carrosses le plus beau jour de l'Automne, pour l'aller passer à une de ces agréables maisons qui sont au bord de la Seine du côté qu'elle descend. Nous étions cinq femmes, et il y avait quatre hommes avec nous, dont l'esprit était assurément très-propre à rendre une compagnie fort agréable. Nous établîmes pour [2] règle de notre societé pendant ce jour-là de ne songer qu'à ce qui pourrait nous divertir, de bannir toutes les pensées d'affaires : nous voulûmes encore, que s'il y avait quelqu'un des hommes qui étaient avec nous, qui eût de l'amour, qu'il fît trêve avec sa passion, afin de n'avoir que des plaisirs tranquilles : on résolut aussi de ne jouer point pour éviter le chagrin d'avoir perdu, et nous voulûmes si bien renoncer à nous-mêmes, que nous changeâmes de nom en badinant : nous ne prîmes pourtant pas d'abord de ces noms de Roman dont il est si aisé de trouver ; et un homme de la compagnie nous ayant dit qu'en Italie dans les célèbres Académies, les particuliers qui les composaient prenaient des noms qui marquaient quelque [3] chose de leur humeur, ou qui avaient quelque autre rapport à eux, nous cherchâmes ou à nous louer ou à nous blâmer en nous designant. Une de mes amies fut nommée l'Indifférent, parce qu'en effet elle aime peu de chose : une autre la Mélancolique, quoi que sa mélancolie soit charmante : la troisième l'Enjoué : la quatrième fut appellée l'Incrédule, parce qu'on n'a jamais pû lui persuader qu'on ait eu ni amour ni amitié pour elle. On appella un des hommes l'Opiniâtre : Un autre le Complaisant, qui mérite en effet ce nom-là. Le troisième se nomma lui-même l'Incertain, n'ayant jamais pû convenir de ce qui le pourrait rendre heureux. Et le dernier fut appellé l'Ambitieux, parce [4] que ceux qui le connaissent bien croient qu'il sacrifierait toujours toutes choses à sa fortune. D'abord cette manière de blâmer et de louer en nommant la compagnie nous divertit et servit de fondement pour nous faire une de ces guerres innocentes qui se sont toujours avec joie, et qui finissent d'estime et d'amitié quand c'est entre des personnes raisonnables. Mais ayant remarqué que nous avions quelque peine à trouver des noms si nouveaux, nous en prîmes dans Cyrus et dans Clélie qui avaient quelque rapport à ces divers temperaments. La belle Enjouée se nomma Plotine, l'Opiniâtre Herminius, l'Ambitieux prit le nom de Themiste, on donna celui d'Artimas à l'Incertain, [5] la belle Indifférente se nomma Cleocrite, la Mélancolique Noromate, le Complaisant Meriandre : mais pour la belle Incrédule, on ne trouva point de nom qui lui convint, et on l'appella Philiste. L'aimable Plotine dit que ce qui faisait qu'on ne trouvait point de belle Incrédule dans tous les Romans, c'est qu'il n'était pas vrai-semblable qu'une belle personne ne crût pas assez facilement d'être aimée. Cependant, ajouta cette aimable femme, je vois bien que le nom qu'on me donne me fait entendre tout doucement que je suis trop gaie ; mais outre que je suis persuadée qu'il faut toujours suivre son humeur naturelle, c'est que je me trouve très-heureuse d'être par temperament ce que tout le mon- [6] de devrait être par raison. Je comprends aussi bien que vous, dit la belle Noromate, que le nom que je porte aujourd'hui, me reproche que je suis d'ordinaire un peu trop sérieuse ; mais comme ma mélancolie ne va pas jusqu'au chagrin et que je n'en ai qu'autant qu'il en faut avoir pour ne rire pas de tout, et pour être capable de secret et d'amitié, je me console de la langueur dont on me fait la guerre. Pour moi, dit Meriandre, je m'aperçais bien qu'en me nommant on a feint de me louer, quoi qu'on ait eu dessein de me blâmer d'une complaisance excessive ; mais pour me justifier et pour me venger, je souhaite de tout mon cœur que tous ceux qui me blâment trouvent un contredisant tous les jours de leur vie, afin de leur faire con- [7] naître qu'il vaut encore mieux être un peu trop complaisant que de ne l'être point du tout. Pour ce qui me regarde, dit Herminius, je renonce à la complaisance et par temperament et par raison : il faut céder aux Loix et aux Souverains sans raisonner ; mais en toutes les autres choses, il faut soûtenir son opinion avec courage, et ne céder qu'à la vérité quand on la connaît. Mais, ajouta-t-il, la belle Cleocrite ne sera pas de mon avis : l'en demeure d'accord, dit-elle, et je trouve qu'il est bien plus commode de s'empêcher de disputer, de laisser croire aux autres ce qu'ils veulent et de croire ce qu'on veut, que d'entreprendre de contester contre tout le monde quand même on a raison. Principalement, dit l'Incertain Artimas, [8] puisqu'il y a tant d'incertitude et dans les choses qu'on dit, et dans les choses qu'on pense. Pour moi, dit la charmante Philiste, on me blâme le plus injustement du monde, car je n'ai de l'incrédulité qu'en amour et en amitié. Je crois aussi facilement qu'on veut, toutes les nouvelles qu'on me dit ; mais j'avoue de bonne foi que je crois très-difficilement qu'on m'aime, et je ne pense pas avoir tort : car il y a peu de gens au monde qui sachent aimer, et je crois même pouvoir assurer hardiment que personne n'a jamais su bien précisément jusqu'à quel point il a été aimé ; il y a toujours du plus ou du moins. Celles qui s'aiment fort, croient facilement qu'on les imite et qu'on les aime autant qu'elles s'aiment elles-mêmes. Mais [9] quand on ne veut pas se laisser tromper, on ne se fie pas tant à son propre mérite et l'on se défie davantage des autres. On ne croit point du tout qu'on trouve de l'amour et de l'amitié sincère et tendre dans le cœur de tous ceux qui en parlent ; au contraire on penche à croire qu'il n'en est point, ou qu'il n'en est guères ; et quand il serait vrai que je ferais quelquefois injustice à quelqu'un, j'aimerais mieux en cette rencontre la faire que de la souffrir, quoi qu'en toutes les autre choses il vaille mieux la souffrir que la faire. Mais ce qui fait la plupart du temps qu'on croit facilement d'être assez aimé, c'est qu'on ne veut guères aimer, et il n'y a assurément que les personnes qui seraient capables d'une grande ami- [10] tié, qui puissent bien remarquer les défauts des affections vulgaires. C'est pourquoi pour ne m'y tromper pas, je ne me persuade point aisément qu'on m'aime, je n'en suis pas moins civile ni moins sociable, je n'accuse personne en particulier, je regarde les affections tièdes, infidèles, ou frivoles, comme des défauts du monde en général, et je ne laisse pas de croire qu'il y a de l'estime, et d'une certaine amitié d'habitude et de bienséance qui rend la societé agréable. Mais pour des amitiés tout-à-fait sincères, tendres, et uniques, je n'en crois point, ou je n'en crois guères ; et c'est pour cela qu je loue l'ambitieux de s'être abandonné à l'ambition où la sincère amitié n'est pas nécessaire. Quoi, reprit [11] brusquement l'ambitieux Themiste, vous croyez que l'ambition soit incompatible avec l'amitié ; elle qui fait les Heros, et sans laquelle la Vertu serait languissante ? C'est une passion qui ressemble si fort à la gloire, que très-souvent on les prend l'une pour l'autre ; L'ambition raisonnable ne met pas dans le cœur le désir d'être riche, elle y met celui d'être grand, de surpasser les autres en toutes choses, de se signaler, de plaire à son Prince, et de chercher la Fortune par toutes les voyes honnêtes, soit dans les armes, soit dans les lettres. Il faut même qu'un ambitieux comme je l'entends, ait des amis et qu'il les serve : car quand on ne sert personne, il arrive aussi que personne ne vous sert. Il me semble, dis-je en riant [12] à toute la compagnie, que c'est une assez plaisante chose de penser que nous sommes tous sortis de Paris pour venir faire chacun notre éloge. Tout le monde rit de la remarque que j'avais faite, et l'on cessa de se louer ou de s'excuser. Le lieu où nous étions était agréable, on se promena avant que de dîner : le repas fut excellente et propre : il y eût un concert de violes et de clavecins tout à fait charmant : en suite Noromate chanta deux airs passionnés presque aussi bien qu'on peut chanter : Plotine et Philiste danserent les petites danses avec deux des hommes de la compagnie : on parla de cent choses agréables, où chacun soutint son opinion, selon son nom et son humeur. Mais enfin après que la conversation eût duré [13] quelque temps, les uns proposerent de passer dans une grande salle dont la vue était plus belle, un autre dit qu'il valait mieux aller se promener en carrosse, cet avis fut contredit, et une Dame soutint que quand on allait à une maison de campagne pour un jour seulement, il valait mieux se promener à pied. Cela est bon, dit Plotine en souriant, quand on a dessein de se séparer de la compagnie pour faire une conversation particulière avec quelqu'un qui plaît plus que tout le reste ; mais hors de là il vaut autant se promener en carrosse. Je vous assure, ajouta Philiste, que la plupart du temps ces gens qu'on voit qui se séparent des autres ne savent que se dire quand ils sont éloignés. Pour moi, dit Merian- [14] dre, quand je suis en une compagnie comme celle-ci je tiens toujours que tous les plaisirs sont bien choisis, et je me range facilement à celui qu'on me propose. En mon particulier, lui dit Cleocrite, je fais par indifférence ce que vous faites par une complaisance obligeante pour vos amis. Et pour ce qui me regarde, dit Artimas, j'ai plutôt fait de ne vouloir rien que d'examiner si je veux une chose plutôt qu'une autre ; car à peine me suis-je persuadé que j'ai choisi, que je blâme mon choix, et ne veux plus ce que j'ai voulu. Mais peut-être donc, reprit Plotine, ne voulez-vous plus déjà être ici. Tout le monde rit de ce que disait cette aimable femme. Ah Madame ! reprit agréablement Artimas, c'est mon esprit qui [15] est irresolu, mais pour mon cœur il ne l'est point du tout ; et comme il y a ici des personnes que j'aime fort tendrement, je suis ravi d'y être, et je ne connais point d'irresolution sur cela. Je suis persuadé, dit Herminius, qu'il faut nécessairement se déterminer sur toutes sortes de choses, et se faire un choix, même des plaisirs. Ah pour les plaisirs, m'écriais-je, vous êtes en la plus grande erreur du monde si vous croyez qu'il faille choisir des plaisirs qu'on ne puisse changer : car depuis qu'on commence à parler jusqu'à ce qu'on cesse de vivre, les plaisirs changent, et doivent changer. On le joue dans l'enfance, on aime les divertissements, et on les cherche avec empressement dans la belle jeunesse : on les souffre [16] sans les chercher dans l'âge qui suit celui-là, et puis enfin on s'en fait d'autres dans la suite de la vie. Je crois même, ajoutais-je, qu'en un même temps et en un même jour on peut se divertir et s'ennuyer d'une même chose ; les longs plaisirs cessent de l'être, il ne faut ni de trop longues Comedies, ni de trop longues musiques, le bal quand on a trop dansé cesse de divertir, les longues railleries sont ennuyeuses, et c'est proprement dans les plaisirs qu'il faut de la varieté et des intervalles, et que le cœur et l'esprit ont besoin de se délasser. A parler en général, on voit que les hommes peuvent être capables de se contenter d'une seule occupation : un homme de guerre se contente de sa profession, un magistrat de la sienne, [17] un homme de lettres de même, un grand Peintre peint toute sa vie sans s'ennuyer, un Sculpteur fait toujours des statues et ne se chagrine que quand il n'a pas occasion d'en faire, et ainsi de toutes les autres occupations de la vie, grandes et petites, selon les différentes conditions : mais nul homme n'a jamais eu un plaisir unique. C'est pour cela qu'on parle ordinairement en notre langue des plaisirs, et non pas du plaisir, quand on veut parler des amusements et des divertissements dont nous parlons ici, et non pas de ce mouvement intérieur de joie et de satisfaction qu'ils peuvent produire en nous, chacun supposant secrètement qu'une seule chose ne saurait le produire toujours, et que le changement, la varieté et la nouveauté en font la principale [18] partie. Si quelqu'un veut donc choisir un plaisir pour toute sa vie, je crois qu'il viendra bientôt à bout de n'en avoir aucun. Je suis tout à fait de contraire avis, dit Plotine, et vous ne prenez pas garde que chacun de ces plaisirs dont nous parlons à une varieté et une étendue presque infinie, qui se découvrent tous les jours davantage à ceux qui s'y attachent entièrement, et le leur rendent toujours nouveau, quoi que toujours le même. Si cela est, reprit Herminius, il faut donc bien choisir ceux ausquels on se veut attacher. Je vous assure, ajouta la mélancolique Noromate, que ce mot de choix est trop sérieux pour cela, et selon moi, il les faut suivre selon son inclination : car je suppose que les plaisirs dont nous parlons, sont proprement les [19] plaisirs innocent ; ainsi n'ayant point à délibérer s'ils sont justes ou injustes, je conclus qu'il faut les prendre selon que le hazard les offre, et selon qu'ils se rapportent à notre humeur : car enfin, il n'y a rien de certain à décider là-dessus. Malgré mon incertitude, dit Artimas, je connais que la belle Noromate a raison. Ce n'est pas, ajouta-t-il, que qui me proposerait d'aller à la chasse par un vilain temps comme font les chasseurs déterminés, je n'aimasse mieux aller à la Comedie. On ne vous dit pas, dit alors Plotine, que vous soyez obligé d'accepter tous les plaisirs qu'on vous propose : car pour moi, je n'aime non plus la pêche que vous aimez la chasse, et je n'ai jamais compris qu'il y eût un grand plaisir à voir un grand nom- [20] bre de poissons se battre dans des filets, troubler l'eau, se laisser prendre sans pouvoir faire résistance. Sachant que vous dansez parfaitement bien, dit Philiste, je m'imagine que vous préférez le bal à tous les plaisirs. Le bal est assurément une très-agréable chose, répliqua Plotine ; mais comme les Dames ne dansent de bonne grâce dans le monde qu'un certain nombre d'années, je songe déjà quel autre plaisir je chercherai dans deux ou trois ans. La musique en est un qui peut durer toute la vie, dit Meriandre. J'en conviens, répliqua Plotine ; mais il me semble que quand une femme qui a été assez belle n'entend plus chanter les chansons qu'on a faites pour elles, et que l'admirable Lambert et la charmante Hilaire ne disent plus devant elle que [21] des airs nouveaux, faits pour des beautés naissantes, elle n'y prend plus guères de plaisir, et je suis persuadée que celles qui n'y ont plus de part, et qui jugent qu'elles n'y en peuvent plus avoir, n'aiment plus tant la Musique. Mais du moins pour la Comedie, dit Themiste, demeurez d'accord que c'est un plaisir de tous les âges, de toutes les saisons, et de toutes les humeurs : car il y a des poèmes sérieux, d'autres plus enjoués. C'est un tableau de toutes les passions ; les beautés de l'Histoire et de la Fable y sont bien souvent jointes ensemble ; le vice est puni, et la vertu récompensée ; et chacun y peut trouver quelque chose selon son goût : Principalement, inter rompit Plotine en souriant, quand on a le cœur rempli d'ambition, puisque [22] c'est là qu'on voit tous les grands événements de l'Histoire ; mais pour moi, j'avoue sincèrement que quoi que j'aime fort à voir tous les beaux ouvrages, sur tout quand ils sont nouveaux, je ne voudrais pas que ce fût mon unique plaisir, et il cesserait de l'être si je n'en avais jamais d'autre. Pour moi, dit Cleocrite, je les prends comme le hazard me les donne sans m'en mettre en peine, je ne les cherche ni ne les fuis, je crois qu'on peut chercher la Fortune et la trouver ; mais il me semble que les plaisirs fuyent ceux qui les cherchent avec tant d'empressement, et que la peine qu'on se donne pour cela, les fait acheter trop cher. Vous avez raison belle Cleocrite, lui dit Artimas, il arrive bien souvent que les grands plaisirs prémédités en- [23] nuyent à la fin, et il m'est arrivé plusieurs fois en ma vie de me divertir et de m'ennuyer tour à tour en une de ces longues fêtes, où tous les divertissements sont en foule, aussi sont-elles plutôt faites pour faire paraître la magnificence des grands Princes qui les donnent, que pour le plaisir de ceux qui en sont. Comme on m'accuse de ne contredire jamais personne, dit Meriandre, je me trouve aujourd'hui fort embarassé en voyant tant de personnes que j'estime, avoir des sentiments différents, et j'ai presque envie de ne plus parler, afin de n'être pas indigne du nom qu'on m'a donné aujourd'hui. Et pour mériter celui d'opiniâtre, dit Herminius, qu'on m'a donné sans trop de fondement, je soutiens qu'il faut choisir en toutes [24] choses, et considerer une fois en sa vie, ce que tous les plaisirs ont de bon ou de mauvais. Mais, dîtes-moi, interrompis-je, si vous mettez le jeu en général, entre les plaisirs. Non, répliqua-t-il en riant, je le mets entre les passions, et toute la compagnie trouvant qu'il avait raison, on n'examina point celui-là. Aussi bien, dit Artimas, s'exposerait-on à déplaire à trop de gens, si quelqu'un s'avisait de blâmer le jeu. Croyez-moi, dit Plotine, ne nous amusons point à blâmer nul des plaisirs, il n'y en saurait trop avoir, laissez aimer la chasse aux chasseurs, la musique aux âmes tendres, la Comedie à ceux qui aiment les belles choses, la danse à ceux qui dansent bien, la promenade et la conversation à ceux qui ont l'esprit [25] galant, les superbes fêtes à ceux qui les peuvent donner, les carrousels, les courses de bague, et les autres grand plaisirs aux grands Princes, et ne condamnez pas même ceux qui pourraient se divertir à jouër aux noisettes. A ce que je vois, dit la belle Noromate, vous ne blâmez donc pas ceux qui s'amusent à jouër à de petits jeux, comme le jeu des Proverbes, des soupirs, de l'oracle, du Roman, du propos interrompu, des fontaines, des tableaux et plusieurs autres où il ne faut pas tant d'esprit. Je n'ai garde de les condamner, dit Plotine, et je vous assure que j'y au joué deux ou trois fois en ma vie, avec beaucoup de joie ; mais je regarde plutôt ces sortes de choses-là, comme un amusement, que com- [26] me un plaisir : on n'envoyerait pas prier de jouër à de petits jeux, comme on envoye prier de Bal et de la Comedie : deux personnes seules ne s'aviseront pas de jouër aux Proverbes, comme on joue à l'Impériale. Mais lorsqu'un assez grand nombre de personnes se trouvent ensemble, qu'un certain esprit de joie regne dans la compagnie, et que ne pouvant ni parler sérieusement, ni se promener, on cherche simplement à badiner avec quelque sorte d'esprit, je ne des-approuve point les petits jeux, pourvu qu'on les prenne pour ce qu'ils sont. Mais, reprit Herminius, si on les prend pour ce qu'ils sont, on les prendra pour des bagatelles qui ne doivent pas occuper des personnes raisonnables, et j'aimerais autant voir un grand [27] Architecte employer son temps à faire un château de carte comme font les enfants, que de voir des gens d'esprit jouër à bon chat bon rat. Themiste connaissant qu'il ferait plaisir à Plotine de soutenir les jeux, s'opposa à Herminius, et lui dit que ce qui était jeu ne s'appellait pas occupation, et que les Proverbes dont il raillait étaient autrefois une invention que les grands hommes avaient trouvée pour fixer la vérité de toutes choses, et la répandre agréablement dans le monde. Cela était bon, dit Herminius, dans l'enfance de la Morale ; mais aujourd'hui qu'elle est si vielles qu'on ne la connaît quasi plus, on peut passer toute sa vie sans proverbes et sans jouer à un jeu qui force de s'en souvenir. Toutes [28] les Dames et les autres hommes témoignant prendre plaisir à cette dispute, on les laissa parler sans les interrompre. Je sais bien, dit Themiste, qu'on se passe toute sa vie très-facilement de jouer aux Proverbes ; mais je soutiens qu'on ne peut se passer de joie et d'amusement, et que les jeux d'esprit que vous blâmez tant, sont aussi vieux que le monde ; que les grands Rois et les grandes Princesses s'en sont divertis ; que les plus sages hommes d'entre les Grecs les ont pratiquez dans leurs festins ; que les anciens Romains ne les ont pas ignorez ; que le Comte Balthasar dans son parfait Courtisan qui passe pour le modelle de la politesse, parle du jeu d'inventer chacun un jeu, de celui des Folies de chacun, et de plu- [29] sieurs autres. Trois ou quatre Auteurs Italiens en ont fait des volumes entiers ; il s'en trouve même parmi les François : les jeux de Siene ont été célèbres, les rébus, les énigmes, les devises, ne sont-ce pas proprement des jeux ? Croyez-moi, mon cher Opiniâtre, poursuivit l'Ambitieux, il y a plus de jeux au monde qu'on ne croit, tout y est presque bagatelle : c'est pourquoi n'en retranchons point puisqu'il y aurait trop à retrancher. Mais, interrompit Plotine, encore voudrais-je bien savoir dans quel temps on s'est avisé d'inventer de ces sortes de jeux d'esprit. Premièrement, dit Herminius en raillant, je crois que le jeu du Corbillon fut inventé pars les premier Poètes, qui ayant beaucoup de peine à mettre [30] de la raison en rime, accoutumérent les enfants à jouër à ce jeu-là. Quoi que vous disiez cela pour mépriser les jeux, reprit Themiste, je le trouve bien pensé, et j'ai envie de croire que cela est vrai. Mais pour répondre à ce que me demande la belle Plotine, je dirai que les jeux sont originaires de Lydie, et qu'ils sont beaucoup plus vieux que le plus vieil Historien, qu'on appelle le Père de L'Histoire. En effet, ce fameux Auteur rapporte que pendant une famine assez grande, les Lydiens ne purent trouver d'autre invention pour empêcher les peuples de s'affliger, et pour épargner les vivres, que d'inventer des jeux qui les occupaient, et les divertissaient ; et je crois que c'est cette origine qui a introuduit une façon [31] de parler, qui est encore parmi le peuple, lorsqu'il veut dire qu'un homme aime passionnément le jeu, Il en perd, dit-il, le boire et le manger. Ainsi ce qui vous paraît une bagatelle, a été un grand remède pour le plus grand mal de la vie. Mais pour en parler plus sérieusement, on apprend par ce même Historien, qu'Amasis Roi d'Egypte qui vivait du temps de Cyrus, se divertissait à des jeux d'esprit : en effet, il envoya un jour vers un homme dont le nom a résisté au temps et est venu jusqu'à nous, pour lui demander ce qu'il fallait qu'il répondît au Roi d'Ethiopie, qui lui demandait s'il savait bien ce qu'il pourrait faire pour boire toute la mer. L'assurant que s'il pouvait trouver quelque chose de raisonnable à [32] lui répondre, il lui céderait plusieurs villes, et que s'il ne trouvait rien de bon à dire, il en perdrait autant qu'il en pourrait gagner. Le Roi d'Egypte fît cette proposition par une lettre qui fut portée pendant un festin que faisait le Roi de Corinthe aux plus sages hommes de Grèce, celui qui la reçu comme un jeu, y répondit de même ; mais il le fît très-ingénieusement : car il dit à l'Envoyé de ce Prince, Vous direz au Roi votre maître, qu'il n'a qu'à mander au Roi d'Ethiopie qu'il fasse auparavant arrêter tous les fleuves et toutes les rivières, afin qu'il ne boive rien davantage et qu'après cela il fera ce qu'il désire. Il est aisé de juger que cette demande était un jeu d'esprit. Eumetis fille de Roi de Corinthe acquit aussi [33] beaucoup de réputation pour savoir expliquer les Enigmes les plus difficiles. Enfin, les Rois, les Philosophes, les Grecs, les anciens Romains, et la nouvelle Italie, n'ont pas méprisé les jeux d'esprit : il ne faut donc pas trouver étrange qu'on s'y amuse quelquefois. Si vous rapportiez fidèlement, répondit Herminius, toutes les galanteries du temps d'Amasis Roi d'Egypte, vous verriez bien que nous ne nous accommoderions guères de leurs coûtumes. Je consens, dit Themiste, qu'on ne les suive pas en tout : je veux même bien qu'on ne se divertisse pas des mêmes jeux qui les ont divertis ; mais je demande seulement que vous confessiez que les jeux sont aussi vieux que le monde, que des personnes de grande qualité, de grand [34] esprit et d'une grande vertu s'en sont divertis, qu'en des Cours très-galantes on s'y est amusé, et qu'on s'en peut encore divertir. Si j'en étais crue, dit alors la belle Plotine, nous y jouerions tout à l'heure. Je ne méritais pas le nom que je porte, dit le complaisant Meriandre, si je pouvais vous contredire. Et pour moi, dit l'opiniâtre Herminius, je mérite si souvent le mien, qu'encore que je ne cède pas, je veux bien ne m'opposer point à la belle Plotine. Je me suis déjà assez expliquée, dit Cleocrite, pour faire que personne ne doute que je veux tout ce qu'on voudra. Comme mon nom, dit alors l'incrédule Philiste, ne m'oblige à rien, je consens d'essayer si je m'y divertirai : car je n'y ai jamais joué. J'y ai jouée [35] comme un autre, dit Noromate, et je m'y suis toujours ennuyée. Je veux donc entreprendre, dit Themiste, de faire en sorte que vous ne vous y ennuyiez pas. De grâce, dit Artimas, laissez-moi la liberté de douter, si je m'y serai diverti ou ennuyé : car ma prévoyance ne va point jusqu'à savoir ce qui en sera. Je le veux bien, dit Themiste : mais il faut que la compagnie me permettre d'inventer un jeu : car la nouveauté est un charme pour tous les plaisirs. Toute la compagnie ayant consenti à cette proposition, il rêva un moment, et puis il en prescrivit les lois : Premièrement, dit-il, je mettrai dans des billets divers caractères de gens, ou diverses autres choses à ma fantaisie. Je roulerait les billets, je les mêle- [36] rai, et après les avoir bien mêlés dans un vase, tous ceux de la compagnie seront obligez de parler sur le sujet que leur billet leur marquera, et pour moi qui serai le maître du jeu, je ne prendrai point de billet ; mais après avoir écouté tout ce que chacun aura dit, je serai obligé de parler à mon tour, de faire l'éloge de ceux qui auront bien parlé, et de blâmer ceux qui n'auront pas bien fait. Et comme le hazard agit toujour sans choix, je comprends qu'il peut produire d'assez agréables effets, en ce jeu-là, où l'on sera quelquefois obligé de parler de ce qu'on ne sait pas, ou contre ses propres sentiments. Quoi que je craigne un peu, dit Plotine, de ne sortir pas à mon honneur d'un jeu, où je prévois qu'il [37] faut beaucoup d'esprit, je consens qu'on joue à celui-là. Tout le monde ayant donné sa voix, on fît les billets, où l'on écrivit ce qui suit.

Une bonne et une méchante lettre d'amour.
Pourquoi un beau sot est plus sot qu'un autre.
Un faux brave.
Un savant incommode.
Un ignorant qui fait l'habile homme.
Une histoire.
Un conte.
La description d'une belle maison de campagne.
Un homme qui parle trop.
Un bel esprit ridicule.
La différence du flatteur et du complaisant.
[38]
Un hypocrite,
Des vers d'Elegie.
Un galimatias pompeux, qui puisse tromper les esprits mediocres.
Un rébus.
Une chanson.
Un homme qui s'ennuye par tout.
Un homme qui ne sais pas vivre.
Parler contre l'amour.
Défendre l'amour.
Une énigme.
Un souhait.
Tous les divers caractères des coquettes.
Un Madrigal.
Un empressé.
Un brave brutal.
Une devise.
Un plaintif qui se lamente de tout.
Un indifférent enjoué qui ne s'inquiète de rien.
Qu'il faut toujours un confident en amour.
[39]
Qu'il faut point de confident en amour.

Après que tous ces billets furent écrits, la belle Noromate demanda pourquoi il y en avait plus qu'il n'y avait de gens dans la compagnie. C'est afin, répondit le maître du jeu, de faire que le hazard soit plus grand, qu'il y ait plus de varieté dans les sujets sur lesquels le sort peut tomber, et que par consequent on ne puisse se préparer sur rien. La compagnie étant satisfaite de cette raison, et ayant trouvé tous les billets ingenieusement remplis, on les mêla et on les distribua selon qu'on se trouva assis ; mais il ne fut pas permis de voir son billet, qu'on ne fût tout prêt de parler. La belle Plotine étant à la première place ouvrit le sien, [40] et y trouva ce qui suit, Pourquoy un beau sot est plus sot qu'un autre.

Je vous assure, dit l'Enjoué en riant, que je suis bien plus heureuse que je ne pensais : car je craignais fort d'être obligée de bâtir une maison, et qu'il ne m'arrivât de confondre les corridors et les corniches, les bases et les chapiteaux. J'appréhendais encore étrangement d'avoir à parler contre l'Amour : car je le trouve assez nécessaire à la politesse du monde. Je rends donc grâces à la Fortune, de ce qu'elle m'oblige à parler sur un sujet qui est selon mon sentiment, et où il y a peu de choses à dire. Il demeure pourtant certain que la beauté est un grand avantage en toutes sortes de choses, excepté à un sot homme. Parmi les femmes, la beauté fait excuser [41] beaucoup de défauts ; mais parmi les hommes elle redouble les mauvaises qualités. Une belle personne sans nul mérite d'ailleurs, pare le bal et le cours ; elle n'a qu'à ne parler point pour être aimable, c'est du moins un beau tableau : mais pour un beau sot il est cent fois plus insupportable que s'il n'était pas beau. La raison que j'en conçois, c'est qu'un homme qui n'est pas bien fait, n'attire point les regards, on ne s'attend à rien, il se sauve dans la presse, sans qu'on s'apperçoive de sa sottise ; on n'y songe pas, et quand on y songerait, comme sa mine n'a rien promis de bon, on ne lui reproche pas d'avoir trompé les gens. Mais lorsqu'on voit un beau sot avec une belle perruque blonde, le teint d'une belle [42] Dame, de beaux yeux bleus qui ne disent rien, un rire niais qui ne sert qu'à montrer de belles dents, une grande taille qui n'a point de liberté, une physionomie stupide et fade, qui ne signifie quoi que ce soit, avec une sotte gloire sans fondement : il faut bien avoüer qu'un beau sot de cette espèce est plus sot que s'il n'était pas beau, et qu'il ennuye bien davantage ; parce qu'on a dépit d'avoir été trompé pour un moment ; parce que rien n'est si mal ensemble que la sottise et la beauté. C'est proprement un grand et magnifique portail qui promet un Palais, et au delà duquel on ne trouve qu'une misérable cabane sans nuls meubles. Je crois même qu'on peut dire encore qu'un homme n'est pas obligé d'être beau ; mais [43] qu'il est obligé d'avoir de l'esprit, et de savoir vivre ; de sorte que lorsqu'on trouve tout le contraire, et qu'on en trouve un qui a la beauté d'une femme, et n'a pas l'esprit d'un homme, on en est fort rebuté. Et pour aller encore au delà des termes de mon billet, j'ajoûterai qu'un beau sot quand il est vieux, est encore plus sot avec ses vieux attraits, que quand il est jeune, parce qu'il n'y a plus nulle espérance qu'il se corrige de sa sottise. Il y a même plus d'une espèce de beaux sots ; mais ceux que je mets au premier rang sont de beaux sots, audacieux et languissant tout ensemble, qui s'écoutent, quand même ils ne disent rien, qui ne pensent jamais, ni à ce qu'on leur dit ni à ce qu'ils disent, qui s'admirent sans se con- [44] naître, et qui ne laissent pas de porter leur sottise et leur beauté par tout pour incommoder les gens raisonnables.

La belle Plotine ayant cessé de parler, tout le monde crût connaître quelqu'un du caractère qu'elle avait représenté, et chacun se voulait dire un nom à l'oreille, mais le maître du jeu imposa silence, et dit qu'il ne fallait jamais se faire un jeu des défauts d'autrui, que les sots de cette espèce étaient aisez à connaître, et qu'il n'était point besoin de les nommer. Ensuite Philiste ouvrit son billet, et trouva que c'était à elle à faire voir la différence du flatteur et du complaisant. Cette belle personne rêva un moment, et parla en suite en ces termes:

Le hazard a sans doute assez [45] heureusement rencontré en m'obligeant à parler de la différence qu'il y a entre l'honnête complaisance et la flaterie. J'ai une si grande aversion pour tous les flatteurs en général, que cette aversion me tiendra peut-être lieu d'esprit, et me fera mieux découvrir les bassesses de la flaterie ; du moins sais-je que je n'ai pas en moi, ce qui fait le plus universellement souffrir les flatteurs. Car enfin il demeure pour constant que l'on ne pardonne rien si aisément qu'une flaterie dite de bonne grâce, et cela vient sans doute de ce qu'on est son premier flatteur à soi-même, et qu'on se dit presque toujours plus de bien de soi que les autres n'en disent et n'en doivent dire ; de sorte que la flaterie est toujours plus près de ce que nous [46] pensons de nous que de la vérité, et a sans cesse une intelligence secrète dans notre cœur, dont il se faut défier. Ceux qui aiment à être flattez s'estiment trop, et les flatteurs pour l'ordinaire le deviennent, parce qu'ils sentent bien qu'ils n'ont pas assez de mérite ni assez de vertu pour plaire ou acquérir du credit sans le secours de la flaterie, et l'on peut dire qu'ils ont mauvaise opinion et d'eux et d'autrui. Mais avant que de distinguer la complaisance raisonnable de celle qui ne l'est pas, il ne sera peut-être pas mal-à-propos de faire une légère peinture d'un flatteur. Sa première qualité est de renoncer à la vérité sans nul scrupule, et de ne l'employer jamais ; d'être incapable de nulle amitié, de n'aimer que son plai- [47] sir et son intérêt, de ne parler que par rapport à lui, de ne s'attacher jamais qu'à la Fortune : il n'a point de temperament particulier, il devient ce que son intérêt demande qu'il soit, sérieux avec ceux qui le sont, gai avec les enjoués ; mais jamais malheureux avec ceux qui le deviennent, car il les abandonne dés qu'il peut connaître que la Fortune les quitte. Aussi suis-je de l'avis d'un de mes amis qui a dit parlant des flatteurs,

La misère d'autrui réveille leur malice
Au lieu d'exciter leur pitié:
Pour mériter leur haine et leur intimité,
C'est assez qu'on n'ait pas la Fortune propice.
Cette aveugle Déesse est maîtresse en leurs coœurs:
[48]
De tous ceux qu'elle élève ils sont adorateurs,
A tous ceux qu'elle frape ils déclarent la guerre.
L'injustice et la fraude ont des charmes pour eux.
Ils sont l'horreur du Ciel, les monstres de la terre,
Et le dernier malheur de tous les malheureux.

Mais pour en revenir où j'en étais, le flatteur n'est jamais uniforme dans ses sentiments, il est capable de se contredire toujours, de recevoir toute sorte d'impressions, n'y en ayant point qui lui soient particulières ; il veut tout ce qu'on veut, et ne veut jamais rien que pour son dessein. Il fait des vertus de tous les vices quand il lui plaît ; il est aussi insupportable à ceux qui sont au dessous de lui [49] qu'il est soumis à ceux dont il a besoin : car comme il passe toute sa vie à flater ceux qui sont au dessus de sa condition, il veut être flatté de ceux qui sont au dessous. La dissimulation est sa compagne ordinaire, il n'a point de patrie, point de parents, point d'amis, et souvent point de Religion. Les vrais flatteurs ne se contentent pas de louer ceux qui ne méritent pas d'être loués : mais pour plaire à ceux-là même dont ils changent les vices en vertus, ils changent autant qu'ils peuvent les vertus des autres en vices ; et la médisance et la calomnie sont très-souvent employées par un véritable flatteur, pour plaire à ceux à qui il fait sa cour. Il n'advertit jamais ses amis des fautes qu'ils font pendant leur bonne fortune ; [50] mais s'ils tombent, il est le premier à insulter à leur malheur, afin de se rendre agréable à ceux qui leur succèdent. Enfin je soutiens hardiment qu'un flatteur est le plus lâche de tous les hommes : mais entre tous les flatteurs, ceux qui approchent des Grands sont les plus méchants et les plus à craindre ; et on peut dire de la flatterie en cette rencontre, qu'en s'attachant aux Grands, elle fait quelquefois comme cette herbe rampante qui couvre les murailles, qu'elle détruit dans la suite : car il est certain que la flaterie en trompant les Grands, et à l'égard d'eux-mêmes, les rend bien souvent injustes, et ensuite malheureux. La flaterie n'est pas seulement dangereuse dans les Cours, elle [51] l'est en amitié, en amour, et en toutes sortes d'états : car il y a des Amants flatteurs, aussi bien que des Amis et des Courtisans. Il y a pourtant cette différence, que souvent les Amants flatteurs croient une partie des flateries qu'ils disent, et que les flatteurs d'intérêt parlent toujours contre leur sentiment. Et puis à dire la vérité, la flaterie en amour n'est pas si dangereuse : car quand les femmes ont de la raison, elles se défendent de tout ce que les Amants leur disent, et c'est le point le plus important de la Morale des Dames, que de douter de tout ce qu'on leur dit en galanterie. Mais enfin soit à la Cour, soit en amour ou en amitié, c'est la marque d'une âme grande et noble de n'aimer point la flaterie, et d'être incapa- [52] ble de flater. Il faut assurément regarder la flaterie comme une esclave qui est toujours basse, rampante et dépendante de la Fortune. Il y a des flatteurs de toutes conditions, et pour toutes sortes d'intérêts. Ceux qui ne le sont qu'en parasites font le moins de mal, parce que ceux même qui s'en divertissent les méprisent : mais les plus dangereux de tous, sont ceux qui contrefont les amis sincères : car il y a des flatteurs qui parlent eux-mêmes contre la flaterie, s'introduisent dans le monde comme s'ils étaient de véritables amis, et trompent fort souvent des gens fort habiles ; ainsi l'on peut dire que la flaterie sérieuse est la plus dangereuse de toutes. J'ai mille fois en ma vie fait reflexion pourquoi l'on est plus souvent trompé [53] en amis qu'en nulle autre chose. Je connais des gens d'esprit qui n'ont jamais être trompés en nulle affaire d'intérêt, tant ils sont clairvoyant et habiles, et tant ils prennent de soin à s'empêcher d'être surpris. En effet, quand on prend des domestiques on s'informe très-soigneusement des lieux où ils ont été employez, depuis les Intendans jusqu'aux Laquais : et ces mêmes gens si habiles et si sages, et qui apportent tant de précaution à n'être point trompés dans de petits intérêts, prennent hardiment des amis sur les premières flateries qu'on leur dit, et engagent leur cœur avant que de connaître si ceux à qui ils le donnent en sont dignes. Cependant je suis persuadée qu'on devrait apporter mille fois plus de [54] soin à bien connaître ceux dont on veut faire ses amis, que ceux qu'on prend pour ses domestiques : car on ne peut, tout au plus, confier que son argent à ceux qui servent, et l'on confie ses secrets à ses amis. C'est pourquoi il faut avant que de leur donner ce rang-là bien examiner s'ils le méritent, et bien considerer si la complaisance qu'ils ont, est de celle qui naît de l'amitié, et qui est conduite par la raison : car il ne faut pas qu'on s'imagine que je veuille bannir l'honnête complaisance du monde. Les véritables amis ne doivent pas être ni grondeurs, ni brusques, ni desagreables ; ils doivent louer et mieux louer que les flatteurs, et d'aurant plus que pour s'acquerir le droit de reprendre leurs amis en quelques occa- [55] sions, il faut qu'ils les louent en d'autres quand ils en sont dignes : car la plus sincère marque d'amitié qu'on puisse donner, est d'advertir généreusement ses amis des fautes qu'ils font ou qu'ils sont prêts de faire. Il faut même courageusement se mettre au hazard de leur déplaire en quelque sorte, plutôt que de les exposer à faire quelque action dont ils seraient blâmez. Quand on a fait aussi quelque chose qu'on connaît soi-même qui n'est pas bien, il faut prendre garde si nos amis nous le disent, ou du moins en demeurent d'accord avec nous : car si cela n'est pas, il faut conclure, ou qu'ils sont peu éclairés, ou qu'ils sont foibles, ou qu'ils sont flatteurs. Je sais bien que les commencement de la flaterie sont très-diffi- [56] ciles à connaître : la civilité et la politesse du monde la cachent d'abord, l'habitude la fait ensuite souffrir, et dés qu'on s'y est accoutumé on n'est plus capable de la connaître. L'honnête complaisance, qui est le prétexte dont la flaterie se veut couvrir, rend en effet l'amitié plus douce, sert à l'ambition, à l'amour, et est, pour ainsi dire, le lien de la societé. Sans elle les opiniâtres, les ambitieux, les colères, et enfin tous les gens de temperaments violents et contraires ne pourraient vivre ensemble. Elle unit, elle adoucit, elle lie la societé, mais c'est avec un air libre, qui n'a rien de bas ne de servile, qui ne sent ni l'empressement, ni l'intérêt, ni la dissimulation : mais la basse complaisance, ou pour mieux dire, la flaterie se déguise [57] en tout, elle flatte en la beauté, en l'âge, en l'esprit ; elle loue les amis de ceux qu'elle veut flater, et blâme leurs ennemis, quels qu'ils soient, et prend enfin un grand circuit pour assiéger un coœur dont elle se veut emparer. Les véritables amis amoindrissent les offices qu'ils rendent, et les flatteurs les exagèrent. Les amis sincères ne sauraient avoir plus de joie, que de voir que les gens qu'ils aiment sont aimez de tout le monde : mais les flatteurs craignent au contraire, que d'autres ne plaisent plus qu'eux, et c'est proprement dans leur coœur qu'on peut trouver de la jalousie sans affection. Il se faut pourtant bien garder, en s'empêchant de tomber dans un défaut, de tomber dans un autre, et d'être incivil et [58] contredisant. La complaisance des honnêtes gens est très-aisée à discerner quand on y prend garde, elle n'a jamais d'intérêt particulier, elle regarde en général la bienséance du monde ; c'est précisément ce qu'on appelle savoir vivre ; il ne peut y avoir de règles précises pour cela, le jugement et la vertu en doivent prescrire les lois. Il ne faut point être complaisant ni pour tromper son Prince si l'on est à la Cour, ni pour abuser ses amis. Il faut que la dissimulation, le mensonge, ni nul intérêt servile, ne s'y mêlent jamais. Il ne faut pas enfin se faire un métier de la flaterie, qui est assurément un poison plus dangereux qu'on ne pense : car dans le monde il n'y a presque point de flatteurs qui n'en puissent [59] avoir d'autres ; et si les Princes qui ont un esprit fort éclairé, observent soigneusement tout ce qui vient à leur connaisssance, ils verront souvent la flaterie dans leurs Cours, en mille figures différentes. Elle se trouve dans les bals, dans les ballets, dans les fêtes, dans les mascarades ; quelquefois même aux lieux les plus saints, d'où elle devrait n'oser approcher, et elle est pour l'ordinaire plus parée et plus ajustée que la complaisance sincère, qui se fie à ses propres charmes. La flaterie enfin a un langage qui lui est propre, elle ne loue jamais que par des exclamations, et qu'avec dessein de tromper. Je sais bien qu'il y a des flatteurs de temperament, qui ne pensent à rien en particulier, et qui par un dessein général de plaire à tout le monde, ont [60] une certaine complaisance fade qui déplaît : ces gens-là ne sont pas méchants, mais pour l'ordinaire ils ont peu d'esprit, et sentant bien qu'ils ne pourraient pas soutenir leur opinion s'ils en pouvaient avoir une, ils cèdent à tout le monde, et prennent le parti d'être complaisant de profession. Pour ces gens-là ils me font pitié, et je me contente de les éviter sans les haïr : mais pour les flatteurs qui veulent arracher l'estime et l'amitié des honnêtes gens, et des Rois, et des Favoris des grand Princes, par des artifices qu'on devrait punir, je les hai d'une telle sorte, et je les connais si bien, que je pense me pouvoir vanter qu'ils ne me tromperont jamais. Je suis persuadée que le moyen le plus sûr pour se garder [61] de la flaterie, c'est de se bien connaître soi-même : car selon moi, il est plus aisé que de connaître les autres. Un des grand maux que produit la flaterie, c'est qu'elle met souvent de la défiance dans l'esprit de ceux qui la méprisent, et que cela est cause que quelquefois on fait injustice à la complaisance raisonnable des honnêtes gens : et pour vous dire la vérité, je ne porterais pas le nom d'Incredule que la compagnie m'a donné aujourd'hui sans la flaterie, et j'avoue ingénument que j'ai mieux aimé douter de tout, que de m'exposer à être trompée en croyant trop légèrement toutes les flateries qu'on m'a dit.

Philiste ayant cessé de parler fut louée de toute la compagnie ; mais Themiste leur dit que cela était [62] contre les règles du Jeu, et qu'il n'appartenait qu'à lui de louer ou de blâmer, quand tout le monde aurait parlé. On rit un moment de la gravité de Themiste : après quoi Cleocrite suivant son rang, ouvrit son billet, et trouva que c'était à elle à dire un Madrigal ; elle en eût une extrême joie, et se hâta de reciter celui qui suit, que personne de cette aimable troupe n'avait encore vu.

MADRIGAL

Sans nul sujet d'inquietude,
Je préfère la solitude
Au bal, au carrousel, aux plaisirs les plus doux,
On dit par tout que je vous aime,
Belle Iris, jugez-en vous même,
Je suis né pour aimer, et je ne vois que vous.
[63]

Ce Madrigal, dit Plotine, est de ceux que j'aime le mieux ; il est simple et naturel, il n'y a point trop d'esprit : car on en voit où il y en a tant, que l'amour n'y paraît pas. Toute la compagnie convint de ce que disait Plotine, et l'incertain Artimas ouvrit son billet, et trouva que c'était à lui à examiner s'il faut toujours un confident en amour. Il regarda son billet plusieurs fois, il rêva, il commença par un mot, et en dit un autre un moment après, ensuite dequoi il parla de cette sorte.

C'est être traité très-avantageusement par la Fortune, d'avoir à soutenir une opinion qui a pour soi la raison et l'usage. En effet, depuis que l'amour fait des heureux et des misérables, on n'a jamais pû se passer de confidents et [64] de confidentes, et je ne crois pas qu'il y ait rien de plus universellement établi, ni de plus nécessaire dans une grande passion ; je ne crois même pas possible de n'en avoir point. Quand on commence d'aimer on n'est encore obligé à nul secret, de sorte qu'il n'est pas croyable qu'un homme qui devient Amant n'en dise rien à son meilleur ami, et quand le premier pas de la confidence est fait, il faut aller jusques au bout : car rien n'est plus dangereux que de dire un secret à demi : mais enfin, quand cela ne serait pas ainsi, le moyen de renfermer dans son cœur toutes les douleurs ou toutes les joies que l'amour inspire ? si on est maltraité, on s'en console avec son ami ; si on est heureux, on redouble sa joie en la disant à un [65] autre soi-même ; et puis quand il naît quelque petite querelle entre deux personnes qui s'aiment, il est très-commode d'avoir un arbitre secret et fidèle qui puisse la terminer. C'est encore l'unique moyen de ne dépendre point ni de suivants ni de suivantes ; c'est un grand plaisir de pouvais parler des grâces reçues sans être accusé de vanité. Ce n'est pas qu'à regarder les choses d'une autre sorte, on ne pût dire que dans une grande passion les confidents sont quelquefois d'étranges gens. Les uns deviennent rivaux de leurs amis ; les autres sont indiscrets, ils ont eux-mêmes des maîtresses à qui ils redisent tout ce qu'ils savent ; et j'ai vu une fois une aventure de galanterie aller de confident en confident, jusques à ce qu'elle fût sue de [66] tout le monde ; le premier confident le dit à sa maîtresse qui avait une confidente qui le dit à son Amant, cet Amant le dit à un autre confident, et ainsi du reste. Enfin je suis persuadé que c'est quelque sorte d'indiscretion et d'infidelité de confier les grâces qu'on reçoit d'une belle à qui que ce soit, du moins sans sa permission. Le secret qui est le plus puissant charme de l'amour ne se trouve plus dés qu'on a un confident ; il donne même quelquefois plus de chagrin que de consolation ; car il ne s'interesse pas toujours tendrement aux choses ; à peine sait-il ce qu'on lui dit, on devient son esclave au lieu d'être son ami ; on craint qu'il ne parle, et peu à peu on cesse souvent d'avoir de l'amitié pour lui. Ce n'est pas que ce ne soit quelque- [67] fois un grand avantage d'avoir un ami qui puisse observer la maîtresse quand l'Amant est absent, et lui parler de lui selon les occasions ; mais après tout quand la Dame ne pense pas d'elle-même à l'Amant absent, le confident ne sert de guère à l'en faire souvenir ; c'est au cœur à faire cet office, et dans une véritable passion il ne faut point de tierce personne. Cela est bon dans des amours qui ne sont pas innocentes, ce sont des agents et des médiateurs, et non pas des confidents. En cet endroit Artimas s'arrêta un moment, parut pensif et avoir l'esprit partagé ; après quoi il poursuivit de cette sorte. Ce n'est pas qu'il ne puisse y avoir une confidence très-honnête, qui n'est en effet qu'une simple confiance des plus secrets [68] sentiments d'un cœur, ce ne sont pas de ces gens-là qui donnent les lettres, qui servent aux rendez-vous, et qui sont de vrais agents d'amourettes ; mais enfin si un confident ne sert à rien qu'à écouter ce qu'on lui dit, c'est un meuble fort inutile en galanterie ; il faut pourtant bien que cela soit bon à quelque chose, puisqu'on voit même que ceux qui n'ont point eu de confidents pendant que leur amour a duré s'en font pour conter leurs histoires passées, et les plus honnêtes gens en usent ainsi. Il me semble pourtant qu'il est encore plus honnête de conter ce qui est, que de dire ce qui a été ; car dans le fort de la passion on peut être forcé à parler par la douleur ou par la jalousie, et même par un excès de joie ; mais ceux qui content les histoires [69] passées ne peuvent plus le faire que par vanité. Je pense toutefois qu'il est assez difficile de se taire éternellement, et qu'il faut seulement songer à bien choisir les confidents et les confidentes. Mais non, je me dédis, il ne les faut pas choisir, il faut qu'ils se trouvent en quelque sorte engagez dans l'avanture malgré nous, et que le hazard y ait sa part. J'en reviens pourtant encore à dire, que le secret est un grand charme en amour, et que ce n'est pas un petit plaisir, de penser que nulle personne au monde ne sait ce qui se passe entre ce que nous aimons et nous ; que les sentiments qui partent d'un cœur se renferment dans un autre sans que rien d'étranger s'y mêle. Ce n'est pas que la confiance qu'on a en quelqu'un ne renouvelle les [70] plaisirs passés en les redisant ; il y a même cette consideration à faire, que dans toutes les autres choses du monde on dit à quelqu'un ce que l'on pense. Cet échange de secrets est le commerce le plus universel : comment donc pourrait-on s'en passer en amour où l'on a le plus de besoin de conseil et de consolation qu'en nulle autre chose ? Je comprends pourtant qu'on peut dire que l'amour porte toujours son conseil avec lui, et qu'un confident conseille souvent très-mal, car il parle selon son humeur, et n'entre pas dans celle de son ami. Il faut toutefois considerer que notre intérêt nous aveugle en tout, et à plus forte raison en une passion qui aveugle tous ceux qu'elle possède, et qu'ainsi la raison n'est peut-être [71] pas trop opposée à l'usage d'avoir des confidents en amour. Je ne voudrais pourtant pas, si je faisais une reforme en l'Empire amoureux, contraindre tous les Amants d'en avoir, et je voudrais laisser cela à la volonté des belles.

Je n'eusse pas crû, dit Plotine en riant, qu'on eût pû aller au delà de son devoir ; cependant Artimas a bien été au delà du sien. Ne vous amusez point, dit Themiste, à raisonner là dessus, belle Plotine, et voyez quel est le billet d'Herminius ; il l'ouvrit alors, et trouva que c'était à lui à soutenir, qu'il ne faut point de confident en amour.

Ah, Themiste, s'écria agréablement Herminius, je suis le plus heureux de toute la compagnie, puisque sans qu'il m'en coûte [72] une parole je satisferai pleinement aux règles du jeu ; car enfin comme souvent dans les procès de la plus grande importance il est permis d'employer les raisons de sa partie contre elle-même, je crois qu'à plus forte raison je puis employer tout ce qu'Artimas a dit pour prouver qu'il faut un confident en Amour. Car comme la grandeur de son esprit est ce qui fait l'incertitude de sa volonté, il a dit tout ce que j'eusse pû dire de mieux, et qui séparerait toutes les raisons qu'il a apportées sur ce sujet, trouverait qu'il a satisfait aux deux billets que le sort nous a donné. Je dis donc tout ce qu'il a dit, ne pouvant trouver autre chose à dire, et quoi que peut-être j'eusse pû en imaginer moi-même une partie, je ne laisse [73] pas de consentir qu'Artimas ait toutes les louanges qu'il eût fallu nous partager. Tout le monde rit de ce qu'Herminius avait dit ; et il passa à la pluralité des voix, qu'Artimas ayant épuisé ce sujet là, Herminius était bien fondé en sa prétention. On fut même persuadé qu'à dessein il avait voulu faire place aux billets qui venaient après le sien, et on lui donna cette louange peu commune aux gens de beaucoup d'esprit, que personne n'ayant plus de facilité que lui à parler, personne n'avait pourtant plus de facilité à se taire et à laisser parler les autres. Pour moi, dit Artimas, qui entendait bien raillerie, j'avoue que je suis tellement incertain, que je doute si ce qu'a dit Herminius m'est avantageux ou non, et doit passer pour [74] louange ou pour blâme. Nous déciderons cela à la fin du jeu, dit Themiste en riant : Cependant, ajouta-t-il, c'est à Meriandre à voir ce que le sort lui a donné. Il déplia alors son billet, et y trouva ces mots, des vers d'Elegie.

Si le jeu, dit Meriandre, m'eût engagé à une Élégie toute entière, j'eusse été bien embarassé ; mais pour un petit morceau d'Elegie j'en viendrai peut-être à bout : En suite il fut s'appuyer un moment sur une fenêtre du côté du jardin, et vint reciter les Vers qui suivent.

Importune raison vous m'avez dégagé;
Mais malgré vos conseils mon sort n'est point changé,
Je pensais être heureux, et je suis misérable,
[75]
Sans amour en tous lieux la tristesse m'accable,
Je cherche le plaisir, et le plaisir me fuit,
Tout ce qui me plaisait me déplaît et me nuit;
Je n'aime plus Iris, mais je me hais moi même;
Et pour me consoler de ce malheur extrême,
Je veux me rengager, je veux être enflâmé;
Je cherche un jeune cœur qui n'ait jamais aimé,
Qui se laissant toucher à mes pleurs, à ma flâme,
Veuille être pour toujours le maître de mon âme.
Importune raison, allez faire des lois,
Gouverner des États, et conseiller des Rois,
Laissez-moi, laissez-moi ces chagrins pleins de charmes,
[76]
Ces plaisirs qu'on ne sent qu'en répandant des larmes,
Et ne vous mêlés plus de regner dans un cœur,
Qui ne veut plus avoir que l'amour pour vainqueur.

Malgré les règles du jeu, dit Noromate après que Meriandre eût recité ces Vers, je ne puis m'empêcher de dire qu'il y a de la nouveauté à faire des Vers qui ont un caractère assez tendre, quoique celui qui les a faits n'eût plus d'amour. Ce que vous dîtes est bien remarqué, dit Themiste ; mais vous m'empêchez de le dire quand je serai obligé de juger. Cependant, ajouta-t-il en me regardant, voyez ce que le hazard vous donne. Je regardai donc alors mon billet, et je vis que c'était à moi à faire une belle [77] maison de campagne : comme j'aime fort l'architecture, les jardins et les fontaines, je n'en fus pas fâchée ; Voici à peu près ce que je dis.

Je vois bien que selon les règles du jeu je suis condamnée à faire la description d'une belle maison de campagne selon ma fantaisie ; mais comme il me semble que l'imagination est plus agréablement remplie de ce qui est, que de ce qui peut être, je parlerai à toute la compagnie comme si j'avais vu effectivement en quelque part tout ce que je décrirai. Je crois même avoir vu un livre sur la table d'un de mes amis, qui s'appelle le Songe de Polyphile, dont l'Auteur, si ma mémoire ne me trompe, ne laisse pas de parler comme s'il avait vu effectivement tout ce qu'il [78] décrit, quoi qu'il n'ait eu dessein que de donner une idée de la belle Architecture : du moins remarquai-je cela en deux ou trois pages que j'en lus ; car je ne suis pas assez bel esprit pour lire de ces sortes de livres d'un bout à l'autre. Je dirai donc qu'environ à deux lieues de la première Ville du monde, après avoir passé un bois très-agréable, on trouve un pont assez rustique qui traverse une très belle et très-fameuse rivière, au delà de laquelle on monte par un chemin qui ne promet pas ce que l'on doit trouver ; on arrive même à la porte du Palais sans en rien découvrir, car elle cache encore fort modestement toutes les beautés qu'elle enferme ; la face du bâtiment qu'on voit en entrant, n'a pas d'abord cet air surprenant qui [79] fait qu'on est étonné de ce qu'on voit, elle est seulement regulière selon sa disposition ; la cour qui est en terrasse est d'une grandeur raisonnable ; il y a une niche à l'opposite du vestibule qui peut servir à mettre des oiseaux ; elle a une figure rustique au milieu, et des basses tailles des deux côtes ; mais on voit à la gauche de la cour en entrant une balustrade, au de là de laquelle on découvre tout d'un coup une étendue de vue si merveilleuse, qu'excepté la mer, tous les beaux objets du monde sont exposez aux yeux de ceux qui s'y appuyent pour rêver agréablement. Cependant comme cette vue est encore plus belle d'un autre endroit dont je vous parlerai, je ne veux pas m'y arrêter, et je veux vous conduire dans le Palais par un ve- [80] stibule orné au dehors de quelques basses tailles : Cet endroit a quelque chose de singulier, car on peut dire que ce vestibule est double, il penetre tout le corps du bâtiment, la moitié sert de passage pour aller gagner l'escalier à la gauche qui est très-beau et très-clair, et l'autre moitié est proprement un vestibule en escalier employé pour descendre au jardin par des marches des deux côtes, à plusieurs repos. Mais ce qu'il y a de plus particulier, c'est qu'après avoir vu dans la cour cette belle et grande vue au delà de la balustrade, on voit dés le premier pas qu'on fait en entrant au vestibule une vue bornée par de grands arbres qui font un effet admirable. Car ce vestibule en escalier est ouvert de part tout de côté du jardin ; [81] le bas a une balustrade de fer, et les ouvertures du haut ont une figure de chaque côté. De ce lieu là, en baissant les yeux, on trouve un grand parterre bordé de grands arbres qui semblent aller jusqu'au Ciel, qu'on ne voit pas de cet endroit ; et l'on découvre aussi un rondeau avec un jet au milieu ; en suite on monte le bel escalier dont j'ai parlé, et l'on entre dans un grand et magnifique salon qui fait oublier tout ce qu'on a vu et en ce lieu-là et ailleurs, tant il est surprenant, et occupe agréablement les yeux ; et l'on peut dire que tout ce que l'art et la nature peuvent faire voir de plus beau, se voit en ce superbe salon. Il est grand et spacieux, son élévation est proportionnée à sa grandeur, et la forme est très-belle : il y a au bout, du [82] côté de la grande et belle vue, trois grandes croisées en arcade ouvertes de haut en bas, et quatre à la main droite qui ont des vues différentes ; on a même placé vis-à-vis des croisées de miroirs qui redoublent la vue de la campagne, et qui font que cet admirable salon semble être entièrement ouvert de trois faces. Tout le dôme est peint et doré, et a un grand air de magnificence. Les peintures en sont très-belles et d'un coloris fort noble. Le Peintre a représenté l'alliance de deux Maisons Royales. Les deux Nations sont représentées par deux figures de femmes que l'Amour couronne, et vers le haut du tableau paraissent les portraits d'un grand Prince et d'une belle Princesse, soutenus par les Heures. On y voit aussi la [83] Renommée, et plusieurs petits Amours qui chassent le désordre et la discorde ; mais on les prendrait presque pour des enfants de la Renommée, car ils ont tous de petites trompettes à la main, et dans des banderoles les armes des deux Nations, dont l'alliance se fait. On voit encore au haut de la cheminée le portrait d'un jeune Prince qui tient une couronne de laurier, et d'une jeune Princesse, qui seront un jour le plus grand ornement du monde : et l'on voir aussi tout à l'entour de ce magnifique salon dans des cadres dorés, de grandeurs différentes, mais rangés en ordre, entre les croisées les portraits de plusieurs grands Princes et grandes Princesses des principales Couronnes de l'Europe ; de sorte que de partout on ne [84] découvre que de beaux objets. Mais après avoir regardé tous ces portraits, dont la description serait trop longue, et où l'or des frises et des corniches se mêle et éclate agréablement entre les peintures, on va au bout du salon, dont les grandes croisées sont ouvertes, et l'on entre sur un corridor à balustrade qui regne tout à l'entour du bâtiment, d'où l'on découvre la plus belle vue qui puisse tomber sous les yeux. C'est en cet endroit qu'il faut que l'art cède à la nature, et qu'on est si surpris et si charmé, que les paroles manquent pour exprimer ce que l'on voit. Cette vue n'est ni trop vaste ni trop bornée ; elle a des objets en toute sorte de distance, les yeux sont occupez et divertis sans se laisser, la diversité [85] fait que cette vue a toujours de la nouveauté pour ceux même qui en jouissent le plus souvent, et l'on y remarque toujours quelque chose qu'on n'y avait pas encore aperçue. On voit sous ses pieds un grand parterre en terrasse partagé en deux, un agréable canal bordé de gazon et couvert de Cygnes, avec une allée basse qui regne tout à l'entour, et des orangers qui la forment. Ce parterre en terrasse est bordé d'agreables vases remplis de mirthes fleuris : le canal a deux jets d'eau qui le rendent encore plus agréable ; à la gauche pardessus une touffe d'arbres qui semblent n'oser s'élever en cet endroit de peur de dérober la vue, paraît le pont rustique dont j'ai déjà parlé, et plus loin un village qui orne le [86] paysage, principalement parce qu'il a derrière lui un grand et agréable bois qui par cette opposition fait un objet plus aimable, et pardessus ce bois en éloignement paraît une montagne couronnée de bâtiments. On voit aussi assez loin à la gauche un Château dont l'architecture assez antique ne laisse pas d'embellir cet endroit ; et on voit même dans une touffe d'arbres qui est au delà du canal un petit dôme tirant sur la droite qui semble s'y cacher, et qui ajoûte pourtant quelque chose d'agreable à ce lieu là ; et pardessus les arbres on voit des prairies et des saules qui laissent paraître la rivière à travers leurs feuilles menues, on dirait qu'elle serpente en cet endroit pour en être plus belle, comme si elle avait [87] peur d'être prise pour un canal, et après avoir fait un détour à la droite, elle se cache et s'enfuit entre les montagnes. On découvre même de ce lieu-là pardessus mille objets surprenants qui s'effacent peu à peu en s'éloignant, la première ville du monde, qui par sa propre grandeur ne laisse pas de se faire remarquer malgré l'éloignement, et l'on discerne aisément en un beau jour les belles et longues galeries du Palais d'un grand Roi. On voit enfin des montagnes au delà de cette superbe Ville, qui semblent s'unir avec le Ciel, et donner une borne sans bornes à cet admirable paysage. Mais pour divertir la vue on aperçoit à la droite au delà des arbres, certains tertres rustiques et sauvages qui font que les autres ob- [88] jets en semblent plus beaux ; la rivière qui fait un détour du même côté embellit extrêmement tout cet endroit, et mille chosse confuses et différentes qui se mêlent parmi celles qu'on peut discerner rendent cette vue grande, noble et charmante. Les quatre croisées qui sont le long du salon ont une vue différente qui a quelque chose de plus propre à la mélancolie, mais qui ne laisse pas de plaire. On voit de là un parterre, un jet d'eau au milieu, et au delà un bois épais et touffu qui semble promettre une forêt derrière lui. La même rivière dont j'ai parlé se montre encore par un petit retour, qu'on ne voit que de là, afin que la varieté divertisse davantage. Mais enfin on se force à sortir de ce superbe [89] salon pour entrer dans une chambre magnifique, où l'on voit sur la cheminée le portrait d'un Roi de qui le surnom de Grand l'a distingué de tous les autres Rois, qui l'ont précedé ; et l'on voit dans la même chambre six portraits de sa famille Royale la première du monde, qui sont parfaitement ressemblants. Pour le dôme on y a représenté les quatre Saisons, et les quatre Éléments ensemble ; c'est à dire qu'à chaque côté il y a un Élément et une Saison. On passe encore dans une autre chambre qui mène au cabinet des bains, qui est très beau et très-agréable. On voit au plafonds Flore représentée, et sur la cheminée le portrait d'une belle Princesse qui efface la Déesse dont je parle ; et à l'entour dans des ova- [90] les les portraits des premières personnes de la terre. Ce cabinet a aussi des miroirs pour redoubler la vue ; et dans un enfoncement qui semble d'abord une alcove, est la place des bains où l'on voit de petites niches avec des figures qui tiennent des vases d'où l'eau semble sortir : Enfin cet appartement est très-beau et très-magnifique, il y a aussi en bas un lieu destiné pour la Comedie. Mais il est temps de vous mener à la promenade, et de vous faire descendre dans le jardin par cet escalier en vestibule dont j'ai déjà parlé. Quand on y est, et qu'on se retourne pour voir le bâtiment, la face en est plus belle que de nul autre lieu, et cet escalier du milieu et le corridor à balustrade qui regne tout à l'entour font un objet [91] qui plaît : mais enfin au delà du parterre on perd la belle vue, et l'on trouve un petit canal solitaire bien différent du premier. Il y a un jet d'eau au milieu, et un bois fort épais au delà qui porte aisément à la rêverie : cette eau paraît sombre comme la mélancolie qu'elle inspire : on descend en suite par un escalier assez rustique, ayant à la gauche ce petit canal dont j'ai parlé, et à la droite une petite allée basse assez étroite, fraîche et agréable, avec un ruisseau qui passe tout du long au milieu, et une petite grotte sauvage et solitaire au bout extrêmement propre à laisser passer la grande chaleur des plus longs jours de l'Été. A côté de celle-là regne une allée haute et aussi sombre ; et en avançant un peu da- [92] vantage, on en voit une plus petite qui a une agréable fontaine au bout, et qui est très-propre à rêver, sans vouloir être interrompu. En suite on van en un carrefour champêtre, où l'on trouve trois petites allées qui vont en baissant, entre de grands arbres, jusques à trois fontaines avec des bassins rustiques ; et au delà ces mêmes allées continuent en s'élevant, ce qui fait une vue bornée de partout, qui ne laisserait pas de plaire à un Amant qui aurait quelque joie ou quelque douleur à cacher. En suite on va par un chemin très-agréable voir une grotte, au devant de laquelle est un gros bouillon d'eau, dont le murmure commence de marquer l'abondance qu'il y en a en ce lieu-là. On voit à la droite une [93] allée avec un jet d'eau, et à la gauche cette même allée qui continue ; et au delà d'une fontaine une perspective qui laisse entrevoir une petite Nymphe qui semble n'avoir encore le cœur occupé que d'un petit chien qu'elle aime, et qui est représenté au même lieu. On entre en suite dans cette grotte où l'on rencontre tout ce qui peut amuser les yeux, et tout ce que l'art qui s'est rendu le tyran des eaux les plus libres a inventé de plus joli. Mais comme j'ai en suite à parler de plus grandes beautés, je ne m'y arrêterai pas ; car il y a autant de différence entre les agréables grottes et les magnifiques cascades, qu'on en voit entre ces jolies bagatelles et ces petits services d'argent dont on amuse les enfants [94] de qualité, et ces grands et magnifiques bassins, avec leurs vases et leurs civières que tout le monde a été admirer aux Manufactures royales sous la conduite du Brun. Au sortir de la grotte, il faut passer assez près du haut d'une admirable cascade, qu'on ne peut s'empêcher de regarder : Mais comme cet amas de belles choses ne se doit pas voir de là, je vous dirai qu'en allant d'un bel endroit à un autre, on trouve par tout des allées différentes ; qu'on découvre tantôt des balustrades, tantôt des palissades ; et qu'enfin descendant entre de grands arbres qui semblent toucher les nues, on arrive à un grand carré d'eau qui est une des plus belles choses qu'on puisse voir. Il est d'une grandeur qui a de la magnificence, il est revêtu d'une balustra- [95] de du côté du bois qui va en montant ; et du côté de cette balustrade justement au milieu et sous les plus beaux arbres du monde, paraît un grand rocher d'eau qui par divers gros bouillons reguliers et tumultueux fait un objet admirable ; deux fontaines dont les jets vont en arcade, accompagnent cette roche de cristal mobile, s'il est permis de parler ainsi, et plusieurs mufles au dessous de la balustrade jettent l'eau par gros bouillons dans ce grand carré que je viens de décrire. Mais tout cela n'est rien en comparaison d'un grand et gros jet d'eau qui est au milieu, car il part avec une impetuosité si grande que la rapidité des fusées ne peut tout au plus que l'égaler en vitesse, sans le surpasser en hauteur : [96] En effet il s'élance avec un bruit qui marque sa force, et passant au dessus des plus hauts arbres semble ne devoir s'arrêter que dans le Ciel, et les yeux y seraient sans doute trompés, si l'on ne voyait enfin que grossissant et s'éparpillant en s'élevant, il retombe en suite comme une pluie d'orage qui trouble toute la tranquilité du carré d'eau, et dont le bruit murmurant chasse agréablement le silence d'un si beau lieu. On ne prend point garde durant cela qu'à l'opposite de ce carré d'eau il y a une vue rustique fort agréable, ni qu'il y a des endroits sauvages tout à l'entour qui en redoublent la beauté, et à peine s'apperçoit-on qu'à droit et à gauche on voit une grande et belle allée qui a des niches d'ar- [97] chitecture en un bout. Mais enfin on vous force de quitter ce bel endroit pour aller le long de cette allée qui conduit à la cascade. Quand on y est arrivé, on est charmé par la beauté de ce magnifique et surprenant objet, et l'on peut dire que si les rivières ont leur lit naturel, l'Art a pris plaisir d'en faire un très-superbe à ces torrents reguliers qui se précipitent les uns après les autres sur cette belle montagne d'architecture, s'il m'est permis de parler ainsi : car au contraire des fleuves qui ont leur lit dans des valees, il faut que les cascades aient les leurs dans des lieux élevez. On voit donc au haut de celle dont je parle une balustrade dorée, au milieu paraissent des armes les plus illustres du monde portées [98] par deux fleuves et soutenues par un Dauphin à tête dorée ; et à droit et à gauche des fleuves on voit deux figures de chaque côté qui ornent cet endroit, et qui sont encore accompagnées de quelques autres : les fleuves ont des vases auprès d'eux d'où sort une quantité d'eau prodigieuse : Le Dauphin en jette aussi une abondance extrême, et à droit et à gauche de ces grandes napes d'eau sont deux longs rangs de chandeliers à gros bouillons, et à jets entremêlés de gazon, et d'une agréable rigole ; et plus bas deux autres rangs de jets et de bouillons plus petits, mêlés encore avec de la verdure. Mais entre tous ces chandeliers, ces bouillons et ces jets de grandeur différent paraissent encore des mu- [99] fles dorés qui jettent de l'eau ; et vers le haut, outre ces rangs élevez de tant de bouillons d'eau, on voit deux autres Dauphins soutenant des figures qui jettent aussi de l'eau abondamment, et parmi tout cela un grand nombre de boules dorées représentant des bombes, et servant de corps à une très-belle et très-ingénieuse devise [Alter post fulmina terror] qui a été faite par un homme de beaucoup de mérite pour un très-grand Prince. Mais tout ce qu'on peut dire ne peut représenter ces grandes napes d'eau, ces jets, ces bouillons, ces rigoles, ces ruisseaux, ces torrents qui se précipitent à l'envie l'un de l'autre, et qui contribuent tous selon leur pouvoir à enchâsser dans du cristal liquide cette belle montagne d'architecture. En un [100] endroit les eaux jalissent, en l'autre elles coulent et s'étendent : en un lieu elles se précipitent, en l'autre elles ne font que glisser ; et cet élément qui n'a presque point de couleur naturelle en prend là plusieurs d'espace en espace pour le plaisir des yeux. Car les gros bouillons d'eau blachissent comme la neige, les rigoles prennent la couleur du gazon, l'eau qui s'épanche sur les chandeliers et sur les mufles, fait des flots dorés comme le sont ceux du Pactole, et toutes ces eaux ensemble, par tout les mêmes et par tout différentes, se répandent avec tant de force, et tant d'abondance, que quand elles auraient la mer pour réservait elles ne pourraient paraître avec plus de prodigalité. Mais enfin elles se déchargent dans un grand [101] bassin qui a plusieurs jets d'eau et plusieurs mufles dorés qui se déchargent aussi dans des coquilles à double rang ; et c'est précisément à droit et à gauche qu'on voit cette belle devise dont j'ai déjà parlé. Pour accompagner cette magnifique cascade, au delà de ce bassin que je viens de décrire qui a des deux côtes les figures des quatre vents, et quelques autres, sont deux Dragons qui jettent aussi de l'eau, et une belle allée gazonnée par le milieu, et de chaque côté elle a des jets d'eau en forme de balustrade de cristal qui retombent dans de petits bassins liés par un agréables ruisseau qui murmure et qui coule entre du gazon : et plus loin est encore un rondeau, avec un beau jet au milieu, au delà du- [102] quel est une allée conduisant jusqu'à une balustrade qui donne sur le bord de la rivière. Le paysage, à droit et à gauche, est très-beau ; mais on ne peut le voit que la cascade ne cesse d'aller, encore est-ce tout ce qu'on peut faire que de cesser alors de regarder son magnifique lit, ou pour mieux dire son superbe trône qui la fait regner sur tous les beaux lieux d'alentour. Mais enfin pour achever la description que je suis obligée de faire, quand on est las d'admirer une si belle chose, on tourne à droit, et l'on voit un coteau rustique borner agréablement la vue pour la délasser des grands objets qui l'ont occupée. On voit aussi de grands arbres dont l'ombrage plaît extrêmement : On voit en suite une [103] porte grillée, une allée qui va jusqu'à une balustrade, et de ce lieu-là le grand jet qui est au milieu du carré d'eau est admirable. On voit encore un beau verger en passant : on tourne à droit dans une allée d'où l'on en découvre plusieurs autres, et de grands compartiment de gazon à gauche, entremêlés de petits canaux et de petits carrés d'eau, avec des jets d'eau en arcade qui font un objet merveilleux : car tout cela est bordé de verdure, et les allées qui forment les compartiment sont sablées ; mais cette simplicité qui a un air champêtre, a pourtant quelque chose de grand et de noble qui plaît infiniment. On arrive enfin à un endroit où il y a un rondeau à treize jets d'une égale hauteur rangés avec ordre ; [104] il est au milieu de huit allées dont l'on voit également cet agréable objet, et toutes les vues de ces huit allées sont différentes. De l'une on voit un coteau de vignes, et nulle habitation ; et d'une autre une partie du bâtiment et une allée haute qui couronne ces montagnes : à la gauche un petit bois en forme de labyrinthe ; et en avançant on voit un autre jardin qu'on achève. Il est fermé d'un côté par un berceau de chèvrefeuille et de jasmin : les trois autres faces sont des palissades de chèvrefeuille, avec des portiques de ci-près ornés aussi de chèvrefeuille sur le haut. Ce jardin est encore par grands tapis de gazon, avec un rondeau au milieu, ayant à la droite le long de la montagne une allée plus haute, [105] et au dessus encore un canal en terrasse de plus de cinquante toises de long bordé de gazon. Il y aurait encore cent autres belles choses à décrire, si je ne craignais que ma description ne fût trouvée trop longue ; c'est pourquoi je me contenterai de prier celui qui doit être mon juge de repasser dans son imagination la beauté de salon, de la belle vué, des jardins différents, des bois, des fontaines, des canaux, des allées, du carré d'eau, de ce jet merveilleux qui va presque attaquer le Soleit, et de cette cascade admirable où l'Art fait une si douce violence à la Nature, où les fontaines deviennent torrents, où les torrents se changent en paisibles rondeaux, et où l'on voit enfin ce qu'on ne peut [106] même voir en la superbe Italie, ni en nul autre lieu du monde, puisqu'il est vrai que depuis que les hommes ont trouvé l'art de tyranniser les eaux et de les assujettir à suivre leur volonté, on ne les a jamais employées ni avec tant de magnificence, ni avec tant de beauté.

Toute la compagnie commençant alors de vouloir louer la description de cette belle maison, je l'interrompis. Vous croyez peut-être, ajoutai-je, que je suis à la fin de mon discours ; mais il faut pourtant que je vous dise une fantaisie que j'ai : C'est que je ne puis souffrir qu'une belle maison n'ait pas un maître digne d'elle, et je me souviens d'avoir été en de fort beaux lieux qui m'étaient insupportab- [107] bles ; parce que ceux à qui ils appartenaient n'étaient pas assez honnêtes gens pour les mériter et pour les remplir. Il n'en est pas de même du Palais enchanté dont je viens de vous parler, je prétends qu'il appartient à un grand et aimable Prince, et à une belle et charmante Princesse, en qui on trouve tout ce qui attire du respect, de l'admiration, du zèle et de la tendresse. Ces quatre sentiments naissent dans les cœurs dés qu'on les voit. Ces deux personnes sont faites pour les délices des yeux et pour la felicité de l'esprit. Leur naissance royale est la moindre de leurs grandes qualités : on la compte pourtant pour beaucoup, parce que par leur manière obligeante, douce et pleine d'huma- [108] nité envers ceux qui les approchent, on voit qu'ils ne la comptent pas eux-mêmes pour se dispenser d'avoir de la bonté parmi leurs inférieurs, et qu'ils veulent bien qu'on préfère leur mérite à leur condition. Le Prince qui a fait faire cette merveilleuse cascade est, comme je l'ai déjà dit, d'une naissance qui ne voit rien au dessus d'elle : Il est beau, bien fait, et de bonne grâce : il a les cheveux du plus beau noir du monde ; les yeux vifs, brillants, pleins d'esprit, de courage, de bonté et de tendresse ; la bouche très-belle, le sourire agréable et charmant, le nez bien fait, le visage d'une forme qui donne de l'agrément, et un certain air de grandeur mêlé de charmes et d'humanité qui ravit, et qui lui donne une physionomie [109] heureuse et spirituelle capable de plaire infiniment. Il a la taille très-bien faite, les jambes belles, l'air fort libre ; et je conçois enfin qu'un grand peintre en imitant le visage de ce Prince, pourrait représenter un Dieu assez beau pour donner même de la jalousie aux Déesses. Il a de plus cet art de s'habiller galamment, qui est su de si peu de personnes, et qui ajoûte pourtant beaucoup à la beauté et à la bonne mine : Et je me souviens d'un jour entre les autres qu'il avait une veste de brocard d'or, à fond brun, en broderie de perles, dont les boutons étaient de gros diamants, et que tout le monde loua et admira sa magnificence. Mais ce qui le rend digne de toutes les louanges imaginables, c'est qu'il a l'esprit et le [110] cœur proportionnez à sa naissance et aux charmes de sa personne. Il est toujours grand et toujours civil, et par cent manières qu'on ne peut exprimer, il attache les cœurs de ceux qui l'approchent : Il parle fort juste et fort agréablement, et cette charmante familiarité qui s'accommode si bien avec le respect qu'on doit à la personne d'un grand Prince, se trouve éminemment en lui. Il aime tout ce qu'il doit aimer : Il veut bien avoir des amis, et les aimer sans changement. Il est secret quand il le faut être : il protège les siens avec plaisir, leur rend justice même contre ses propres intérêts ; aime à faire du bien à tout le monde, et témoigne enfin par cent choses différentes, qu'il est capable de tout [111] ce qui peut faire un grand et excellent Prince, soit dans la paix, soit dans la guerre. Pour la belle Princesse qui partage sa fortune avec lui, je n'ose penser à la peindre, sachant qu'on en a fait une peinture qui lui ressemble beaucoup mieux, que celle que je mettrais ici ne pourrait lui ressembler. Je me contenterai donc seulement de dire un Madrigal qu'on a dessein de mettre sous un de ses portraits. Le voici:

Cet air si délicat, ce regard enchanté,
Ce teint qui peut ternir et les lys et les roses,
Cet amas surprenant de tant de belles chosses,
Représente à vos yeux la parfaite beauté :
[112]
Mais ce brillant esprit si rempli de justesse,
A nos esprits charmés en fait une Déesse;
Aussitôt qu'on la voit, il la faut admirer,
Aussitôt qu'elle parle, il la faut adorer.

J'ajoûterai seulement à cela, que cette divine Princesse est mille fois au dessus de tout ce qu'on en peut dire, et que quelques louanges qu'on lui ait entendu donner avant que de l'avoir vue, on est toujours surpris de son éclat et de son mérite. Il est aisé de juger qu'un Prince et une Princesse tels que je viens de les représenter, ont une Cour nombreuse, galante et agréable : ils aiment tous deux les personnes de mérite, et les distinguent obli- [113] geamment ; ils ont tout ce qui attire les cœurs et tout ce qui les conserve. On voit de la foule sans confusion alentour d'eux : Tout le monde paraît content quand on les approche : la joie se répand parmi tous ceux qui leur font leur Cour ; et quand ils font une fête dans le beau Palais que je vous ai décrit, rien n'est mieux entendu, plus galant, plus propre, ni plus magnifique. Les jeux, les plaisirs, les amours se trouvent dans toutes les allées et au bord de toutes les fontaines : Le Prince est accompagné de tout ce qu'il y a de grand : la Princesse a des filles dont la beauté peut tout assujettir ; et de tant de personnes accomplies, il se forme une Cour charmante et agréable, où tout plaît, et où rien [114] n'importune. On croirait en ce lieu-là que ceux qui dans tous les siècles et parmi toutes les nations ont tant décrié les Cours des Princes, comme étant remplies de fourbes, d'ingrats, d'ambitieux, de médisant et de calomniateurs : on croirait, dis-je, qu'ils n'on su ce qu'ils disaient : car en celle ci il semble que l'estime, l'admiration et la joie font qu'on ne pense qu'à plaire, et qu'à être souffert agréablement ; et le plaisir qu'il y a d'aimer la Maître et la Maîtresse pourrait même suspendre la haine, l'envie, et toutes les autres mauvaises passions. Enfin, s'il est permis de parler de cette sorte, on les suit sans s'en pouvoir empêcher, et l'on se sent attirer par une douce violence telle qu'on dit qu'était [115] celle de cette charmante harmonie qui se faisait suivre par les bois et par les rochers. C'est à vous, dis-je alors à la belle Mélancolique, à faire ce que votre billet et la loi du jeu vous impose : car je n'ose parler plus long-temps, quoi que j'eusse encore mille choses à dire des illustres personnes qui font non seulement le plus grand ornement du Palais que j'ai décrit, mais un des plus grands ornements du monde. Je n'aurais jamais creû, me dit Themiste, que vous eussiez pû faire une description comme celle-là. Pour moi, ajouta Plotine en m'aadressant la parole, je m'attendais que pour vous acquiter promptement vous nous bâtiriez une petite maison, et cepen- [116] dant au lieu de cela vous nous faites un Palais, un Heros, et une Heroïne. Ah ! m'écriais-je en l'interrompant, il faut que je sois un méchant peintre : car je vois bien que vous m'allez obliger à faire comme on faisait pendant l'enfance de la Peinture, où l'on mettait le nom de ce qu'on représentait, parce qu'on l'avait mal représenté. Je savais bien, poursuivis-je, que je déroberais beaucoup à tout ce que je décrivais, et que les Originaux étaient plus beaux que les copies : mais je n'eusse pourtant jamais creû être contrainte de vous dire que j'ai décrit saint Cloud, que mon Heros est Monsieur, et que mon Heroïne est Madame. A peine eus-je dit cela, que toute la compagnie me demanda par- [117] don de la stupidité ; et quoi que ce soit la coûtume de flater ceux qui ont décrit quelque chose, tout le monde demeura d'accord que j'avais raison, et que ma description était beaucoup au dessous de la vérité. Pour moi, dit Herminius, je ne comprends pas que nous ayons pû écouter tout cela comme un Roman ; c'est sans doute le plaisir qui a suspendu ma raison : car cette belle devise de la bombe, qu'un de mes amis, dont le nom et le mérite sont si connus, a donnée à Monsieur, est dans ma mémoire depuis qu'il la donna et qu'elle fut trouvée si judicieuse, si belle et si convenable à l'illustre Frère d'un grand Roi. Le moyen, dit Philiste, d'avoir seulement entendu parler de la cascade et ne la re- [118] connaître pas ? et le moyen encore d'avoir vu seulement une fois le Prince et la Princesse sans reconnaître ? nous avions assurément tous perdu l'esprit. Pour moi, dit Artimas, j'y ai pensé plus d'une fois, mais doutant de ma pensée je ne la disais pas. En suite on pria Noromate de voir quel était son billet, et l'on trouva que c'était à elle à raconter une histoire : mais bien loin d'en paraître embarassée, elle témoigna en être bien aise. Il paraît tant de joie dans vos yeux, lui dit Plotine, qu'il faut assurément que vous ayez une histoire toute faite dans la tête : car pour moi je serais au désespoir si le hazard m'avais imposé la necessité d'en raconter une. Je suis encore plus heureu- [119] se que vous ne pensez, répliqua Noromate avec un souris charmant : car cette histoire n'est pas seulement dans ma tête, elle est dans un papier qu'un de mes amis m'a donné ce matin : et comme elle n'est pas publiée, et que la personne qui l'a faite a dessein de la donner aux illustres Maîtres du Palais qu'on nous a décrit, je crois satisfaire aux règles du jeu en m'offrant de la lire à la compagnie. Tout le monde demeura d'accord de ce qu'elle disait : mais comme nous en étions là, et qu'on se préparait à entendre ce que la belle Noromate avait à lire, on entendit des tymbales : on envoya savoir ce que c'était, et l'on sût que c'était Monsieur, et Madame qui s'en allaient à saint Cloud [120] où ils donnaient une de ces agréables fêtes dont je venais de parler. On nous dit que toutes les allées seraient éclairées de chandeliers de cristal, qu'il y aurait un feu d'artifice, et que par un mêlange de fusées et de jets d'eau ces deux Éléments disputeraient ensemble à qui divertirait le mieux une si charmante Cour : de sorte que remettant le reste du jeu au lendemain, nous résolûmes d'aller voir cette belle fête, et de revenir coucher en ce lieu-là, où la maîtresse de la maison avait de quoi recevoir très-commodement toute la compagnie dans des appartements très-propres. Un moment après nous sûmes que le Prince et la Princesse avaient ordonné qu'on laissât entrer dans les jar- [121] dins toutes les personnes de qualité. Ainsi nous fîmes collation, et nous fûmes admirer de plus près tout ce que j'avais décrit : et j'eus, si je l'ose dire, la confusion et la joie de voir que tout ce que j'avais loué était beaucoup au dessus de mes louanges. Mais comme le plus grand charme de tous les plaisirs est la liberté d'en changer quand la fantaisie en prend, nous n'achevâmes point notre jeu le lendemain. Nous passâmes pourtant le jour à lire l'histoire que la belle Mélancolique avait apportée, qui nous parut fort divertissante ; mais personne ne voulut que le Maître du jeu prononçât, comme on l'avait résolu au commencement. Ainsi sans que personne eût vaincu nous revînmes à Pa- [122] ris en nous entretenant encore avec plus de plaisir des charmantes qualités de Monsieur et de Madame, que des aventures de Mathilde.

FIN


Return to Early Collaborative Games of Fantasy and Imagination.